2. Part I Policies

2.1.

THE ENVIRONMENT

POLICY 1

THE VALE OF GLAMORGAN'S DISTINCTIVE RURAL, URBAN AND COASTAL CHARACTER WILL BE PROTECTED AND ENHANCED. PARTICULAR EMPHASIS WILL BE GIVEN TO CONSERVING AREAS OF IMPORTANCE FOR LANDSCAPE, ECOLOGY AND WILDLIFE, THE BEST AND MOST VERSATILE AGRICULTURAL LAND AND IMPORTANT FEATURES OF THE BUILT HERITAGE. PROPOSALS WHICH ENHANCE THESE AREAS WILL BE FAVOURED. 

POLICY 2

PROPOSALS WHICH ENCOURAGE SUSTAINABLE PRACTICES WILL BE FAVOURED INCLUDING:

  1. PROPOSALS WHICH CONTRIBUTE TO ENERGY CONSERVATION OR EFFICIENCY, WASTE REDUCTION OR RECYCLING; POLLUTION CONTROL; BIODIVERSITY AND THE CONSERVATION OF NATURAL RESOURCES;
  2. PROPOSALS WHICH ARE LOCATED TO MINIMISE THE NEED TO TRAVEL, ESPECIALLY BY CAR AND HELP TO REDUCE VEHICLE MOVEMENTS OR WHICH ENCOURAGE CYCLING, WALKING AND THE USE OF PUBLIC TRANSPORT;
  3. THE RECLAMATION OF DERELICT OR DEGRADED LAND FOR APPROPRIATE BENEFICIAL USE; AND
  4. PROPOSALS WHICH IMPROVE THE QUALITY OF THE ENVIRONMENT THROUGH THE UTILISATION OF HIGH STANDARDS OF DESIGN.

Glamorgan Heritage Coast 

2.1.1.

The overall objective of the Part 1 environment policies is to establish a strategic environmental framework which reflects the aim to improve the quality of both urban and rural living in the Vale and to ensure that finite resources are protected for both present and future generations. 

2.1.2.

The Vale of Glamorgan is an area of rich and diverse countryside, beautiful coastline and attractive and historic settlements. The desirability of both urban and rural areas of the Vale of Glamorgan has resulted in increased pressure for a range of developments including residential, employment, leisure uses and associated infrastructure. The Plan recognises the need to balance the requirements of development with the aims of conservation, and is strongly committed to conserving and enhancing the natural and built environment of the Vale in order to ensure it remains an attractive, healthy and enriching environment in which to live and work.

2.1.3.

The natural environment of the Vale of Glamorgan is a rich mix of undulating farm land, valley basins, woodland and unspoilt coastline. A testimony to the richness and diversity of the natural environment of the Vale of Glamorgan is the presence of a number of protective designations. The Vale has twenty two Sites of Special Scientific Interest totalling some 850 hectares, two Local Nature Reserves and seven Wildlife Trust Reserves incorporating twelve miles of the Glamorgan Heritage Coast stretching from Ogmore-By-Sea to West Aberthaw. This stretch of coastline includes the Dunraven Bay candidate Special Area of Conservation (SAC). The Severn Estuary at Penarth is a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI), Wetland of International Importance (RAMSAR site), Special Protection Area (SPA) and a possible Special Area of Conservation (pSAC). 

2.1.4.

The built environment of the Vale of Glamorgan exhibits a great variety of townscape and architectural character, from the Victorian housing of Penarth and industrial heritage of Barry, to the older agricultural market towns of Cowbridge, Llantwit Major and the surrounding rural settlements. The historical significance of many of the buildings and settlements in the Vale is illustrated by the designation of 38 Conservation Areas, over 400 Listed Buildings and over 90 Ancient Monuments. In addition, the Vale has two Landscapes of Outstanding Historic Interest and 18 Parks and Gardens listed within the Register of Landscapes, Parks and Gardens of Historic Interest in Wales.

2.1.5.

The aim of strategic Policy 2 is to attempt to ensure that all proposed development within the Vale of Glamorgan respects the need to work towards sustainable development. The principle of sustainable development was defined by Brundtland in the Report of the World Commission on the Environment and Development 1987 as:

“development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.”

The role of a Unitary Development Plan in guiding development at local level can have a significant impact upon reducing damaging practices and ensuring the conservation of valuable resources. The importance of this role is acknowledged by the Welsh Assembly Government in Planning Policy Wales 2002, which states:

“In particular the planning system, through both UDPs and the development control process, must provide for homes, infrastructure, investment and jobs in a way which is consistent with sustainability principles.”

2.1.6.

The UDP has an important role in defining strategic and detailed policies which can contribute to achieving global environmental objectives such as reducing acid rain, minimising global warming, halting the depletion of the ozone layer and reducing the consumption of non renewable resources. To this end the Plan will strive to promote sustainable practices through policies which seek to encourage recycling and reduce waste material; reduce pollution and ensure the efficient use of valuable resources; conserve important nature areas; reduce the need for personal transportation and encourage alternative modes of travel and ensure the reuse of both brownfield sites and derelict and degraded buildings.

2.1.7.

The Council are committed to producing Supplementary Planning Guidance on Sustainable Development, to help guide developers and encourage sustainable practices throughout the Vale. Similarly, a Topic Paper on Sustainability Indicators is also to be produced, setting out a framework by which developments, and the effectiveness of the Plan as a whole, and their contribution towards a sustainable future can be judged.

2.2.

HOUSING

POLICY 3

LAND WILL BE MADE AVAILABLE FOR AN ADDITIONAL 6079 DWELLINGS BETWEEN 1998 - 2011. THIS PROVISION WILL BE MET BY:

  1. THE PROVISION OF INFRASTRUCTURE AND SERVICES FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF SITES WITH PLANNING PERMISSION FOR HOUSING; 
  2. THE REDEVELOPMENT OF SUITABLE SITES IN THE URBAN AREAS OF BARRY, PENARTH AND RHOOSE;
  3. THE REPLACEMENT OF UNFIT AND SUBSTANDARD HOUSING;
  4. THE DEVELOPMENT OF A RANGE OF SITES IN THE SOUTH EASTERN PART OF THE VALE OF GLAMORGAN WITHIN AND ADJOINING BARRY, PENARTH AND RHOOSE, TO BE IDENTIFIED IN PART II;
  5. THE DEVELOPMENT OF MINOR SITES IDENTIFIED IN PART II;
  6. THE MAINTENANCE, REHABILITATION AND IMPROVEMENT OF EXISTING HOUSING STOCK, THE CONVERSION OF SUITABLE EXISTING DWELLINGS AND THE CHANGE OF USE OF SUITABLE STRUCTURES TO PROVIDE ADDITIONAL MODERN HOUSEHOLD UNITS; AND
  7. AFFORDABLE HOUSING FAVOURED AT APPROPRIATE LOCATIONS AND IN ADDITION, THE PROVISION OF AFFORDABLE HOUSING ON APPROPRIATE SMALL SITES OUTSIDE OF THE GENERAL HOUSING ALLOCATION.
2.2.1.

The Unitary Development Plan Dwelling Projections

New housing at the Waterfront in Barry The plan's strategy recognises the important strategic role of the Vale of Glamorgan in enhancing the economic and social well being of a wider region. The housing target reflects the need for additional houses arising from demographic change over the plan period, whilst acknowledging the continuing strong demand to live in the area and the aims to achieve economic growth. Nevertheless, a housing target has been set that is considered to reconcile the pressure for housing growth with the environmental aims of the plan. 

2.2.2.

Pressure for housing growth is exerted by natural changes in the population (net gains in births over deaths; propensity to live longer), inward migration (moving for new jobs), and from movements amongst existing households (home movers; new household formations). There are no absolute methods for predicting the actual housing requirement over the fifteen-year life of the Plan, as housing demand is greatly influenced by changing economic forces and market conditions. A bestestimate of the likely demand is derived from a consideration of past population and housing growth together with the development strategy for the area. A Housing Topic Paper provides the technical justification to this issue and is available separately free of charge. This considers the long-standing trend for inward migration into the Vale and models different future population and housing scenarios using the well-respected Chelmer model. 

2.2.3.

Population projections provide a useful model to test different future scenarios and can be used to assess future housing requirements. Projections have been prepared from a base year population derived from the 1991 Census and the 1996 Registrar General Mid Year Estimates. To these are applied birthrates, death rates and migration rate assumptions to forecast the level of population expected by 2011. The estimated future population is then factored by forecast average household size, dwelling sharing rates and vacancy rates which together with assumptions for house building and demolitions allow for the total dwelling requirement to be derived.

2.2.4.

A model using the short-term trend between 1991-1994 for net population losses from out-migration from the Vale was rejected because of the effects that the recession of the early nineties would have had on such movements, and the incompatibility this has with the presently strong economic climate. Instead, a longer-term trend for net population gains between 1981-1996 from in-migrationwas used as the critical factor in modelling a possible future population and housing scenario. This covers a broader time span of economic activity and reflects the resulting strong pressure to live in the area on housing growth. Increasing the levels of in-migration further was considered to place undue pressure on the environment of the Vale and to be incompatible with the overriding aims of the Plan. 

2.2.5.

In real terms, to continue the trend for inward migration over the past two decades is to reduce the proportion that actual in-migrants comprise of the total population i.e. if an allowance is made for the same number of in-migrants to the Vale every year, that number becomes a smaller proportion of the gradually expanding population. Such an approach is consistent with one of the plan's key strategic aims for the Vale to become more self-sustaining.

2.2.6.

The population and housing projection identifies an additional need for 8,612 dwellings over the twenty-year period 1991-2011, approximately 6,500 between 1996-2011. This is represented in Policy 3 (and Figure 2.1 below) as requiring 6,079 new dwellings over the thirteen-year period 1998-2011 after subtracting the first seven years of new dwelling completions and the need for a 10% contingency allowance to provide for flexibility in the range and choice of sites provided.

Figure 2.1. Calculation of Housing Target

New dwelling requirement 1991-2011 (20 years)
8,612
- Completions 1991-1998 (7 years)*
3,086
Residual dwelling requirement 1998-2011 (13 years)
5,526
+ 10% contingency allowance
553
Final Housing Target 1998-2011
6,079

*Source: Joint Residential Land Availability Study 1st April 1998 (WDA, 1999)

2.2.7.

Many of the residential allocations made under Policy HOUS 1 already have the benefit of planning consent and additional allocations are therefore required to ensure a sufficient supply of housing land throughout the plan period. New sites are accordingly allocated under Policy HOUS 1 and these are distributed throughout the Vale to provide for a range and choice of development opportunities. All of the major development sites are well related to and adjoin the existing urban areas of Barry, Penarth and Rhoose. As such a wide range of existing or developing employment, shopping, leisure and education facilities are within easy reach and with limited public investment they can be served by the public and private transport network. The sites will be planned in a comprehensive fashion to ensure high quality environment and a full range of appropriate local facilities.

2.2.8.

The Council does not intend to allocate any further new major housing areas in the Rural Vale up to the year 2011. New development in the countryside that is unrelated to existing urban areas will only be permitted where it can be justified in the interests of agriculture, forestry, appropriate recreational activities, mineral extraction or the conversion of existing rural buildings where appropriate. However, criterion (v) of Policy 3 does provide for minor sites identified in Policy HOUS 1 in other locations in the Vale of Glamorgan and criterion (vii) ensures that all sections of the population will have suitable and affordable housing provided for them. 

2.3.

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT & TOURISM

POLICY 4

AN ADDITIONAL 160 HECTARES OF LAND WILL BE MADE AVAILABLE FOR EMPLOYMENT USES FROM 1996 - 2011. THIS LAND WILL:

  1. MATCH THE EXISTING AND FORECAST DEMAND FROM INWARD INVESTORS; AND 
  2. ASSIST THE APPROPRIATE EXPANSION OF LOCAL BUSINESSES AND FACILITATE NEW START-UPS.

POLICY 5

A RANGE AND CHOICE OF SITES FOR BUSINESS AND INDUSTRIAL PURPOSES IS IDENTIFIED IN PART II AND WILL BE PROTECTED FROM ALTERNATIVE USES. THESE SITES WILL:

  1. BE WELL LOCATED IN RELATION TO URBAN REGENERATION PROJECTS; 
  2. BE WELL LOCATED IN RELATION TO AREAS OF HIGH UNEMPLOYMENT, SOCIAL STRESS AND DEPRIVATION;
  3. BE WELL LOCATED IN ORDER TO REDUCE THE NEED FOR PRIVATE TRANSPORT AND INCREASE THE USE OF PUBLIC TRANSPORT;
  4. BE WELL LOCATED IN ORDER TO CONSERVE THE CHARACTER OF THE VALE OF GLAMORGAN ENVIRONMENT;
  5. CONTRIBUTE TO THE LAND BANK FOR PROJECTS OF REGIONAL IMPORTANCE ESPECIALLY LARGER INWARD INVESTMENT PROJECTS; AND
  6. RECOGNISE THE OPPORTUNITIES IN THE VALE OF GLAMORGAN TO CREATE HIGH QUALITY DEVELOPMENTS IN ORDER TO ATTRACT HIGH QUALITY EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES.

POLICY 6

TOURISM DEVELOPMENTS WILL BE FAVOURED WHERE THEY:

  1. ASSIST THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE LOCAL ECONOMY; AND/OR
  2. SAFEGUARD OR ENHANCE THE QUALITY OF THE ENVIRONMENT. 
2.3.1.

The Economic Development policies provide for a choice of employment sites to meet the needs of a range of potential employment uses. Serviced sites are identified in urban areas close enough to residential areas to minimise travel times to meet sustainability objectives, and to minimise the impact on local amenity. Others are located in the Rural Vale but concentrated in strategic locations so as not to lead to sporadic development in the countryside. In identifying sites, emphasis has been given to the need for the re-use of brownfield sites. It is essential that a good supply of land is maintained in order to enhance the local economy, and for this reason the stock and range of employment land will be reviewed periodically. 

2.3.2.

The rural areas of the Vale are important in providing a strong agricultural base together with a quality environment that is a key part of the area's attraction. Economic development must be complemented by measures to protect and enhance the environment. A growing number of businesses demand higher quality sites, separate in many cases from other types of industry. Land must therefore be reserved for such businesses as appropriate. Similarly, expanding or new employment uses must not cause harm to the local environment, as this would be counter productive and discourage further investment.

2.3.3.

The Council recognises the importance of promoting the well being of South East Wales, and sees the future prosperity of the Vale as a vital component in the prosperity of the region as a whole. The Council will therefore continue to participate in partnerships with other local authorities and organisations involved in economic development to enhance opportunities for job creation and the provision of infrastructure and training. In response to this need the Council will protect sites which are of strategic importance to both the Vale of Glamorgan and South East Wales through their proximity to existing or proposed strategic transport networks and their attractiveness to inward investors.

2.3.4.

The important role of small businesses in the community must not be underestimated and the Plan seeks to support the creation of small industrial units on identified sites.

2.3.5.

The Council estimates a requirement for an additional 160ha of land to be made available to meet demand for employment uses for the period 1996 - 2011 meeting the needs of indigenous companies and inward investors. The Council will seek to concentrate new development in existing employment locations whilst adhering to strict design guidelines to complement the character of the Vale of Glamorgan. The regeneration of brownfield sites will also provide an opportunity to meet demand for employment uses. An employment topic paper has been produced which examines in detail the existing employment situation in the Vale and outlines how the requirement for the additional 160ha was derived.

2.3.6.
Bosch factory at Miskin

In employment terms the Vale of Glamorgan has a varied profile containing a number of well known manufacturing and service industries. Historically, however, it has not been self-sufficient in employment provision. The growth in white collar and service sector employment in the late 1980's in South Wales masked an underlying imbalance in the local economy brought about by the decline in manufacturing industry. The imbalance has aggravated the problem of long term unemployment, especially amongst the young.

2.3.7.

Unemployment in the Vale of Glamorgan in October 1997 was estimated to account for 4.7% of the total workforce compared to 5.7% for Wales as a whole (Office for National Statistics, December 1997.) Whilst the unemployment rate is declining, pockets of much higher unemployment exist within the Vale where long term unemployment is a particular problem.

2.3.8.

Policy 6 recognises the economic, environmental and social benefits that a well managed sustainable tourism industry can bring to the Vale of Glamorgan. Within this context the Council is committed to developing tourism and the enhancement of existing tourism areas and facilities, whilst protecting and enhancing the environment and safeguarding the interests of local communities.

2.4.

TRANSPORTATION

POLICY 7

IMPROVEMENTS TO THE TRANSPORTATION NETWORK WILL CONSIST OF:

  1. STRATEGIC TRANSPORT SCHEMES WITHIN AND ADJOINING THE EXISTING URBAN AREAS OF THE WATERFRONT STRIP OF PENARTH, DINAS POWYS, BARRY AND RHOOSE; 
  2. LOCAL SCHEMES NECESSARY FOR ENVIRONMENTAL AND SAFETY REASONS; AND
  3. SCHEMES TO ENCOURAGE TRAVEL BY CYCLISTS AND PEDESTRIANS.

POLICY 8

DEVELOPMENTS WILL BE FAVOURED IN LOCATIONS WHICH:

  1. ARE HIGHLY ACCESSIBLE BY MEANS OF TRAVEL OTHER THAN THE PRIVATE CAR; AND 
  2. MINIMISE TRAFFIC LEVELS AND ASSOCIATED UNACCEPTABLE ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS.
2.4.1.

The Part 1 policies aim to provide an improved transport network incorporating both private and public and motorised/non-motorised transport, and also to influence the location of development so that opportunities are available to use modes other than the private car.

2.4.2.

Recent Transport Trends

At present the Vale of Glamorgan experiences transport problems and trends similar to many other areas of the U.K.

2.4.3.

Decline in public transport patronage
Nationally and locally the growth in private transport use continues and at the same time public transport patronage is declining. Nationally the distance travelled by bus and coach (billion passenger kilometres) fell by over 40% between 1961 and 1995 (Office for National Statistics 1997), although in recent years the rate of decline has slowed. In the Vale of Glamorgan rail patronage has fallen on the Barry Line by 35% between 1980 and 1995, and on the Penarth Line by around 40% over the same period. 

2.4.4.

Growth in car use
Traffic on the Barry to Culverhouse road Road traffic levels in Britain have been rising sharply and projections to 2025 predict a further 55% growth to 660 billion vehicle kilometres per annum according to lower forecasts, and to 800 billion vehicles kilometres according to upper forecasts (Office for National Statistics 1997). In the Vale of Glamorgan traffic growth has been noticeable in recent years on all types of roads. For example between 1985 and 1995 traffic flows on the A48 rose by around 41%, and on the B4265 at Wick traffic flows rose by around 63% between 1985 and 1995. Nationally car, van and taxi modes accounted for 86% of all distances travelled in Great Britain during 1995 (Office for National Statistics 1997). In general the car is also used for short journeys which could be replaced by walking or cycling. 

2.4.5.

Modal split
In 1993 a survey showed that in a typical day for journeys originating in the Vale of Glamorgan, 188,748 were by car drivers and passengers, whereas only 16,029 journeys were made by bus and only 3,026 journeys by rail (SGCC Home Interview Survey 1993).

2.4.6.

Journey to work
The 1991 Census also showed that in the Vale of Glamorgan 69.3% of persons travelling to work used a car, with only 5% using the bus and 4.5% using the train.

2.4.7.

Car ownership
Car Ownership levels in the Vale of Glamorgan also shows a steady growth. In 1971 39.3% of households had no access to a car. However by 1991 this figure had fallen to 26.6% of households. Second car ownership in the Vale of Glamorgan has more than doubled, from 12.7% of households having two or more cars in 1971 to 27.7% of households in 1991 (1991 Census).

2.4.8.

Growth in journey length
The problems of high car ownership, increasing car use, growing traffic levels, and declining public transport patronage are further compounded by growth in trip lengths. Overall trip distances by car are also increasing as mobility increases and the catchment of regional centres such as Cardiff expands.

2.4.9.

Continuing growth in private car use cannot be sustained indefinitely and throughout the Plan period it will be essential to continue to develop the role of public transport and to ensure public transport, cycling and walking facilities are a consideration in land-use planning.

2.4.10.

Environmental Concerns

The environmental impact of high levels of use of motorised private transport is an important concern. In 1994 in Britain road transport accounted for around 90% of all Carbon Monoxide emissions, and about 60% of "black smoke", and nearly 50% of nitrogen oxide emissions in the U.K. (Office for National Statistics 1997). Pollution is normally a problem associated with larger urban areas, which is often compounded by congestion. In the Eastern Vale congestion occurs on certain roads during the peak hours. In the Rural Vale the effects of traffic pollution/congestion are not often directly experienced, but the contribution to national levels of pollution through car use remains a matter of concern.

2.4.11.

The land-use implications of facilitating movement in the Vale of Glamorgan are an important environmental consideration. New transport infrastructure can have an impact on landscape and wildlife etc., although new highway construction can achieve positive environmental, safety and economic benefits. In addition it will be important to consider the indirect impacts of new transport development such as improvements in access leading to pressure for development in areas where development had not previously been planned.

2.4.12.

Economic and Social Issues

Access to jobs and services for Vale residents are vital, as is the potential for transport measures to increase the accessibility and therefore attractiveness of employment land and development sites. In the past the need to actively develop the “market accessibility” of the Barry area has been highlighted, in terms of improving infrastructure to facilitate access to employment sites. The strategic transport improvements referred to in Policy 7 will improve accessibility to the Barry area and at the same time ensure that these improvements will take place to serve existing built up areas and new development in the Coastal Strip. Both private and public transport measures will be important. Public transport improvements are important to provide a means of transport for those who do not have access to a private car, especially for employment, and access to goods and services.

2.4.13.

Both strategic transport policies are aimed at ensuring that the above economic and social roles for transport can be met. Improvements to the strategic transport infrastructure will serve the existing built-up areas of the Waterfront Strip where new development will also be concentrated in line with the UDP strategy. The location of development will be influenced by the level of accessibility by means of transport other than the private car, which in practice means locations mostly in existing urban areas. These policies combined with the other policies in this plan will encourage development within the existing urban areas of the Waterfront Strip, thereby acting to reduce journey lengths, reduce the need to travel by private car, promote opportunities to travel by public transport, cycling, and walking.

2.4.14.

Strategic Transport Policies

Policy 7 illustrates the range of proposed improvements to the existing transportation network. These improvements cover three areas: the development of strategic highway and public transport schemes; appropriate local highway schemes; and schemes to promote cycling and walking.

2.4.15.

The strategic highway and public transport improvements will be focused within and adjoining the urban areas of the Waterfront Strip to meet the existing demand for travel in this area and to facilitate demand for travel from new developments which the Plan seeks to concentrate in this area of the Vale.

2.4.16.

Local highway improvements will only be considered if they are necessary to alleviate existing environmental problems or if the scheme is vital for safety.

2.4.17.

Cycle path facilities in Penarth The development of facilities to encourage travel by cyclists and pedestrians is also included in this policy. These modes form an important element in any transport strategy, either as a form of transport in their own right or as part of a longer journey. Cycling development is seen as particularly important both for commuting and leisure purposes throughout the Vale of Glamorgan.

2.4.18.

Policy 8 represents a mechanism for realising the important relationship between land use planning and transportation.

2.4.19.

This policy is designed to provide opportunities to concentrate major generators of demand for travel in existing built-up areas, where:

  • access to public transport facilities; cycling and walking measures can be easily be introduced/improved; 
  • where the close proximity of housing, employment opportunities, retail facilities and other services encourages a reduced trip length and encourages travel by means other than the private car;
  • and where existing local and district facilities are located.
2.4.20.
Brownfield sites especially, can provide a useful opportunity to provide locations for development which match many of these criteria.
2.4.21.

These criteria highlight the need to locate developments where their transport needs can be accommodated. The policy provides scope to allow the assessment of the likelihood of public transport/ cycling/ pedestrian facilities being provided at a site and therefore also provides for a developer to become involved in the delivery of such facilities to provide an appropriate level of service to the development. The table shown in Appendix 5 (PPG 13: A guide to better practice. HMSO 1995) provides examples of how these principles could be applied nationally. The second criteria in this policy favours developments which create minimal increases in traffic levels and reduce the impact of any unacceptable environmental effects, mostly emissions and nuisance from noise and vibration.

2.5.

RETAILING

POLICY 9

THE VITALITY, ATTRACTIVENESS AND VIABILITY OF EXISTING TOWN, DISTRICT AND VILLAGE SHOPPING FACILITIES WILL BE PROTECTED AND ENHANCED.

POLICY 10

EXISTING TOWN AND DISTRICT CENTRES, INCLUDING THE WATERFRONT, BARRY, WILL BE THE FOCUS OF NEW SHOPPING DEVELOPMENTS. OUT OF CENTRE SHOPPING DEVELOPMENT WILL BE PERMITTED IF:

  1. THERE ARE NO SUITABLE TOWN, DISTRICT OR EDGE OF CENTRE SITES;
  2. THE PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT DOES NOT HAVE AN UNACCEPTABLE IMPACT ON EXISTING SHOPPING CENTRES OR PROPOSED RETAIL AREAS IDENTIFIED IN PART II; AND
  3. THE PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT IS ACCESSIBLE BY MEANS OF TRAVEL OTHER THAN THE PRIVATE CAR.
2.5.1.

It is one of the Government's objectives to sustain and enhance the vitality, attractiveness and viability of existing town and district shopping centres. Policy 9 seeks to promote this principle within the Vale of Glamorgan and extends it to recognise the vital economic and social role local shops play in rural areas. 

2.5.2.

Vitality is generally reflected in how busy a place is at different times, attractiveness in the facilities and character which draw in trade, whilst viability refers to the ability of the town or district centre to attract investment to maintain the fabric and allow for improvement and adaptation to changing needs. 

2.5.3.

Vitality, attractiveness and viability of centres will be measured in the Vale throughout the plan period by using the following measures:

  • turnover in relation to floorspace
  • commercial yield on non-domestic property
  • shopping floorspace rents
  • retailer representation and change
  • diversity of uses
  • accessibility
  • pedestrian flow
  • vacancies
  • environmental quality
  • perception of safety/occurrence of crime
2.5.4.

The Government in Planning Policy Wales (2002) states that existing town and district centres will be the preferred location for new retail development. The town and district centres in the Vale of Glamorgan are as follows:

  • Barry Town Centre
  • Penarth District Centre
  • Llantwit Major District Centre
  • Cowbridge District Centre
  • High Street / Broad Street, Barry
  • Upper Holton Road, Barry
2.5.5.

If there are no suitable town centre sites, new retail development should be located at edge of centre sites.

2.5.6.

A suitable town/district centre site is one acceptable for the form of town centre development proposed in respect of its site, location, access and relationship to adjoining uses.

2.5.7.

A suitable edge of centre site will be in a location that are within easy walking distance of the centre i.e. 200 - 300 metres from existing town centre shops. Netto in Thompson Street, Barry is a good example of an edge of centre site providing parking facilities that serve the town centre as well as the store.

2.5.8.

An out-of-centre site is within a location that is clearly separate from the town centre but is not necessarily outside the urban area. The Waitrose store at Palmerston, Barry is a good example of an out of centre store.

2.5.9.

An out of town site is an out of centre development on a greenfield site or on land clearly not within the current urban boundary e.g. Culverhouse Cross retail park.

Part of the Culverhouse retail park 

2.5.10.

Several proposed retail areas are identified in Part II, Policy SHOP 3, and a retail hierarchy for the Vale of Glamorgan is also shown in Part II. This gives a definitive list of existing retail centres in the Council's area. It is important that any future proposals for new retail development do not undermine the development of these sites for retail purposes.

2.5.11.

In line with Government advice all new retail developments should be accessible by a mixture of private and public transport modes and minimise the need for travel. This is usually the case for town and district centre sites, but is rarely so for out of town proposals/developments.

2.6.

SPORT & RECREATION

POLICY 11

TO REMEDY EXISTING DEFICIENCIES IN SPORT AND RECREATIONAL FACILITIES THE COUNCIL WILL:

  1. FAVOUR THE PROVISION OF A RANGE OF SUCH FACILITIES TO MEET EXISTING AND ANTICIPATED NEED THROUGHOUT THE VALE OF GLAMORGAN BY SECURING IN ACCESSIBLE AND APPROPRIATE LOCATIONS NEW AND IMPROVED SPORT AND RECREATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES; 
  2. PROTECT EXISTING AREAS OF OPEN SPACE AND PLAYING FIELDS FROM INAPPROPRIATE DEVELOPMENT; AND
  3. FAVOUR THE IMPROVEMENT OF OPPORTUNITIES FOR ACCESS TO AND ENJOYMENT OF THE COUNTRYSIDE WHERE THEY DO NOT UNACCEPTABLY AFFECT IMPORTANT AREAS OF NATURE CONSERVATION AND LANDSCAPE AND THE INTERESTS OF RESIDENTS AND / OR THOSE WHO DERIVE THEIR LIVELIHOOD FROM THE LAND.
2.6.1.

The Council accepts and supports the social and economic importance of sport and recreation to the quality of life of the residents of the Vale of Glamorgan. This acceptance dictates that a primary land use aim of the Plan must be the protection and improvement of existing recreational provision, whilst providing new facilities and opportunities in areas of identified deficiency. The provision of new facilities is heavily dependent on the financial resources available to the Council through its budget, which is currently heavily restrained. The Council will, however, strive to ensure that recreational facilities are provided within and as a consequence of new developments by, where appropriate, entering into legal agreements with developers to secure provision by the private sector. In conjunction with this commuted sums will be sought from the developer on the basis of a twenty-year multiplier to reduce the future maintenance costs to the Council. Other areas of funding will also be utilised to the full including Sportlot, and central government grants.

2.7.

MINERALS

POLICY 12

A SUFFICIENT STOCK OF STONE, FOR BOTH AGGREGATE AND CEMENT PRODUCTION, WILL BE PROTECTED TO MAINTAIN THE VALE OF GLAMORGAN'S TRADITIONAL SHARE OF REGIONAL SUPPLIES. IN ADDITION, THE RECYCLING OF SECONDARY AGGREGATES AND INDUSTRIAL WASTES WILL BE FAVOURED AND ENCOURAGED TO THE MAXIMUM PRACTICABLE EXTENT AS SUBSTITUTES FOR NATURALLY OCCURRING MINERALS.

2.7.1.

Pant Quarry The Council accepts that the Vale of Glamorgan is an important regional provider of minerals, and that demand for minerals, whilst variable, will continue into the indefinite future. Whilst making a commitment in the Plan to provide for a continuation of the Vale's regional contribution, it is recognised that limestone and other naturally occurring minerals can be replenished only over geological timescales. It is therefore vital to use these resources wisely and efficiently, whilstensuring that future sources of minerals are not rendered unworkable by the injudicious siting of other developments on or near them. Also, in recognising that workable reserves of natural minerals will not last indefinitely, the Council supports the principles of sustainability by encouraging the use of alternatives to naturally occurring minerals wherever this is technically possible and where it does not have unacceptable effects on the local environment.

2.8.

WASTE MANAGEMENT

POLICY 13

DEVELOPMENT PROPOSALS WHICH ENCOURAGE SUSTAINABLE PRINCIPLES FOR WASTE DISPOSAL BASED ON A HIERARCHICAL APPROACH OF:

  1. WASTE MINIMISATION / AVOIDANCE;
  2. RE-USE OF WASTE;
  3. WASTE RE-CYCLING OR RECOVERY (INCLUDING WASTE CONVERSION TO ENERGY); AND
  4. WASTE DISPOSAL LAND FILL WITH MINIMAL ENVIRONMENTAL
    IMPACT;

 WILL BE FAVOURED.

2.8.1.

Current and future EU and UK policy and legislation is crucial to formulating a longterm strategy and developing systems and facilities for waste management. The Council accepts and supports the policy emphasis of the Waste Management Hierarchy and seeks to ensure that the philosophy is applied in practice. Policies for Waste Management have been prepared in accordance with National and European guidance, within the framework of the overall Plan and seek to accommodate waste management uses that meet the needs of the community in a way that provides a balance between environmental and social needs.

2.9.

COMMUNITY AND UTILITY SERVICES

POLICY 14

DEVELOPMENTS ASSOCIATED WITH COMMUNITY AND UTILITY SERVICES WILL BE PERMITTED IF THERE IS NO UNACCEPTABLE IMPACT ON THE INTERESTS OF AGRICULTURE, CONSERVATION, LISTED BUILDINGS, ARCHAEOLOGICAL FEATURES, AREAS OF ECOLOGICAL, WILDLIFE AND LANDSCAPE IMPORTANCE AND RESIDENTIAL AMENITY.

2.9.1.

The strategic objective of this policy is to ensure that an adequate supply and range of community and utility services exist to meet the needs of the residents of the Vale of Glamorgan but without adversely affecting the natural, built or historic environment. Utility services are of strategic significance on two main levels. Firstly, they provide the basic services for the functioning of the community in terms of energy generation, water supply, sewage disposal and telecommunications. Secondly, because they are normally large land users, both in terms of supply and distribution, they may have to be sited in areas where development would not normally be permitted. In addition to the provision of strategic utility services there are a range of community services which are essential to the well being of any community. These comprise social services, education, health and library facilities.

Llandough Hospital 

2.9.2.

The Council will attempt to ensure close liaison and early consultation with the major utility companies in order that service provision throughout the Vale is of the highest standard. The Council is aware, however, that the provision of some services can have an adverse effect upon the environment of the Vale of Glamorgan. The Council will seek to balance the requirements of community and utility services and environmental objectives to ensure that the environmental effects of such developments are minimised e.g. by requiring the laying of underground cables in areas designated for their landscape and / or townscape importance.

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