4. Housing

4.1.

INTRODUCTION

Example of new housing in Barry
4.1.1.

The Vale of Glamorgan offers a high quality environment providing a choice between urban and rural areas in which to live. In addition to the attractions of the main towns of Barry and Penarth, the charm and character of many of the areas towns and villages, coupled with their proximity to Cardiff contributes to the popularity of the Vale of Glamorgan as a place to live.

4.1.2.

The Housing policies and proposals put forward below aim to ensure the availability of an adequate range and choice of housing sites throughout the Vale. This includes the provision of all housing types and requirements, including dwellings available to persons not easily able to compete in the existing, predominately private, market. The Policies for housing in the Vale of Glamorgan have been formulated not only having regard to present and future requirements but also taking account of the scale of development which has taken place over the past twenty to thirty years and the consequent need to protect the environment of the Vale from inappropriate future development.

4.1.3.

Large Towns

Historically the Council has attempted to protect and conserve as much as possible of the area's environment and countryside by guiding new housing development to appropriate locations where their environmental impact will be minimised. The Council is committed to make land available for an additional 6079 new dwellings during the Plan period. The majority of this dwelling requirement will be accommodated within and adjoining the existing urban areas of the waterfront strip.

4.1.4.

The Council's strategy of reclamation and redevelopment of existing vacant or derelict land in urban areas is focused upon the proposed comprehensive redevelopment of sites at Barry Waterfront, Penarth Haven and Rhoose Point. These sites will provide for new house building throughout the Plan period. Some housing allocations will however need to be made elsewhere to accommodate demand and to provide for a range and choice of housing sites.

4.1.5.

Rural Vale

In recent years Cowbridge and Llantwit Major have accommodated a great deal of new housing development. In view of the existing residential commitments within these towns it is not the intention of the Council to allocate any further land for residential use as it is considered that this would adversely affect their setting and character and would be contrary to the aims and objectives of Planning Policy Wales (2002). Appropriate limited development will however, be permitted within and adjoining the settlement boundaries of Cowbridge and Llantwit Major and other named towns and villages in accordance with Policies HOUS 2 and HOUS 8.

4.1.6.

New Settlements

The Council is strongly opposed to the concept of new settlements and is of the opinion that such settlements would not relieve the pressure for development around existing towns and villages. New villages in the countryside would require new community and utility services and place new demands on roads, drainage and schools. Consequently, the Council does not intend to depart from its stance towards new settlements during the Plan period (Policy HOUS 4).

4.1.7.

Affordable Housing

This chapter also addresses the issue of affordable housing. In accordance with Planning Policy Wales (2002) Technical Advice Note Number 2 'Affordable Housing' (1996), the Council will seek to provide a range of housing types and tenure to cater for all residents of the area. In addition, the Council will seek to achieve the best possible living environment for the residents of the Vale (Policies HOUS 12 and 13).

4.1.8.

Housing for Senior Management

In respect of housing for senior management, the Council has consistently taken the view that there are sufficient sites already available in the Vale of Glamorgan for this type of housing and that there is no requirement for any special provision. Provision for Housing for Senior Management is not an issue raised by current Government Guidance.

4.1.9.

Gypsy Sites

In line with Government advice embodied in Circular 2/94 and Planning Policy Wales 2002, this chapter also considers the need for gypsy sites within the Vale of Glamorgan (Policy HOUS 14).

4.1.10.

Amenity Standards

Supplementary Planning Guidance in respect of Amenity Standards has been produced. Policies HOUS 2,7,8,9,10 and 13 make reference to these standards.

4.1.11.

Residential Land Availability

Part 1 Policy 3 requires that land is made available for 6,079 additional dwellings over the thirteen-year period 1998-2011. The Plan allocates land to meet the residual of this target after those dwelling units that already had the benefit of planning permission at 2001 have been subtracted. The Vale of Glamorgan Joint Land Availability Study is carried out annually by the Welsh Development Agency in co-operation with the Council, representatives of the house building industry and statutory undertakers, and presents an agreed statement of the supply and take up of housing land in the Vale. The 1st April 2001 study provides base data for strategic housing considerations. Site specific data from the study is shown at Appendix 4 and illustrates that:

  1. The total number of units available on site over 10 units with the benefit of planning consent at 1st April 2001 = 2,946 units.
  2. Small sites of under 10 units are capable of contributing an estimated additional 101 dwellings per annum over the following five year period to 2006.
4.1.12.

In addition to the 2,946 units available on existing large sites an allowance is required for the contribution to the housing target from small sites, conversions, changes of use, and windfalls. Windfall sites are sites that at the time of calculating the available residential land do not have the benefit of planning permission or are not identified through this Plan.

 

4.1.13.

It is considered that the contribution of small sites to meeting the housing target is likely to be less towards the end of the Plan period due to the diminishing opportunities for this type of development. An allowance of 76 units per annum is therefore made which represents an average rate of the contribution made by small sites etc., spread evenly over the Plan period. Over the 10 years remaining of the Plan period this will contribute some 760 additional units. The Council will carefully monitor the contribution of these sites to the land supply over the Plan period and will review this figure if necessary.

4.1.14.

Figure 4.1 illustrates the residual need for additional plots after these allowances have been taken into account, and for which new sites are identified under Policy HOUS 1.

Figure 4.1 Source of Housing Supply at 1st April 2001: 

Housing Target 1998 - 2011 (13 years)
6,079
 - Completions 1998-2001 (3 years)*
1,363
 - Sites over 10 units with planning consent*
2,946
 - Allowance for contribution from small sites, conversions, changes of use, and windfalls (10 years @ 76 units per annum)
760
 = Residual Housing Requirement
1,010

*Source: Joint Housing Land Availability Study 1st April 2001 (WDA, 2002)

4.1.15.

Table 1 illustrates the contribution that the major housing allocations will make to the housing target (see also figure 4.1). Many of the sites shown already had the benefit of planning permission at 2001 and are therefore not counted towards meeting the residual housing need identified. Further information in respect of all sites shown however can be found at section 4.4.

Table 1.

Meeting the Residual Housing Requirement with new sites (of 10 or more units)
Ref Available
Site
Additional Units Available 2001-2011
Units after 2011
Total plots available under policy HOUS 1 to meet the residual need 2001-2011 1,057 40
HOUS 1 (1)
Barry Waterfront 1
400
200
HOUS 1 (2)
Harbour Road, Barry
Site complete at 2001
 
HOUS 1 (3)
Pencoedtre, Barry 2
Subject to Development Brief
 
HOUS 1 (4)
Land to R/O Daniel Street, Barry
Site included in 2001 JLAS Study
 
HOUS 1 (5)
Cwm Barri, Barry
Site included in 2001 JLAS Study
 
HOUS 1 (6)
Winston Square, Barry
Site included in 2001 JLAS Study
 
HOUS 1 (7)
Penarth Haven
Site included in 2001 JLAS Study
 
HOUS 1 (8)
Cogan Hall Farm, Penarth
Site included in 2001 JLAS Study
 
HOUS 1 (9)
Cogan Pill Road, Llandough
18
 
HOUS 1 (10)
Redwood Close, Boverton
12
 
HOUS 1 (11)
The Coal Yard, Llantwit Major
Site included in 2001 JLAS Study
 
HOUS 1 (12)
Cowbridge Road and the Saw Mill, Ystradowen
Site complete at 2001
 
HOUS 1 (13)
Rhoose Point
Site included in 2001 JLAS Study
 
HOUS 1 (14)
Mayflower Site, Rhoose
Site complete at 2001
 
HOUS 1 (15)
Marine Drive, Ogmore-by-Sea
Site included in 2001 JLAS Study
 
HOUS 1 (16)
Adj. St Michael's Church, Colwinston
Site included in 2001 JLAS Study 
HOUS 1 (17)
The Limes, Cowbridge
6
 
HOUS 1 (18)
River Walk, Cowbridge
6
 
HOUS 1 (19)
White Farm, Barry
130  
HOUS 1 (20)
Llandough Fields
65
 
HOUS 1 (21)
Palmersvale Business Centre, Barry
20
 
HOUS 1 (22)
Land North of Railway, Rhoose400
200

1 An additional allowance of 400 units (over and above the 1000 units already included in the 2001 study) is made due to increased building densities. An allowance for a further 200 units is made for the mixed use South Quay site. The 200 units outside of the Plan period equate to 100 at the Waterfront and 100 at South Quay

2 The contribution of this site to housing supply is dependent on the outcome of a development brief and any units would be available during the latter part of the Plan period.

4.1.16.
The total land available for residential units over the Plan period is therefore shown in the table above.
4.1.17.

Given the proposed allocations and existing commitments, together with the projected contribution for windfall sites, there will be a healthy supply of available land for housing above the forecast requirement. This surplus will allow for flexibility and the possibility of some sites not being fully developed during the Plan period.

4.2.

NATIONAL PLANNING GUIDANCE

4.2.1.

National Planning Guidance for housing matters is embodied in:

  • Planning Policy Wales (2002)
  • Planning Policy Wales, Technical Advice Note (Wales) 1
    “Joint Housing Land Availability Studies” (1997)
  • Planning Policy Wales, Technical Advice Note (Wales) 2
    “Planning and Affordable Housing” (1996)
4.2.2.

Planning Policy Wales 2002, Chapter 9 requires that the Plan should provide for a full range and choice of housing thereby giving options to people in respect of the type of house they live in.

4.2.3.

In particular the Plan should ensure that previously developed land is used in preference to greenfield sites as well as taking account of the potential in the area for rehabilitation, conversion, clearance and redevelopment of sites. All new housing development should be well designed, and relate / integrate well with existing settlements and where possible it should assist with community regeneration initiatives. Ribbon and fragmented development should be avoided and development should be easily accessible by public transport, cycling and walking. New building in the countryside away from existing settlements or areas allocated for development by the Plan must be strictly controlled. Isolated new dwellings in the countryside will only be permitted where they can be justified in the interests of agriculture or forestry.

4.2.4.

The Guidance states that new settlements are unlikely to be appropriate in Wales and should only be proposed where such development would offer significant environmental, social and economic advantages over the further expansion or regeneration of existing settlements (Policy HOUS 4).

4.2.5.

The Council has undertaken a 'search sequence' as required by Planning Policy Wales (2002) in identifying sites to be allocated to meet the housing target. The search sequence starts with the re-use of previously developed land and buildings within settlements, then settlement extensions and then new development around settlements with good public transport links. In undertaking the search sequence particular consideration has been given to:

  • The contribution to the housing supply of sites with planning permission for housing. Council resources do not permit the revocation of current planning consents for housing development.
  • The allocation of previously developed sites or empty or under-used buildings that are suitable for housing within settlements.
  • The allocation of housing sites that are highly accessible by transport means to jobs, shops and services other than by the private car.
  • The capacity of existing or proposed infrastructure to absorb further development and the cost, if necessary of adding further infrastructure.
  • The ability to build communities to support new physical and social infrastructure and the need to provide sufficient demand to sustain appropriate local services and facilities.
  • The physical and environmental constraints on the development of land.
  • The need to assist urban regeneration.
4.2.6.

Planning Policy Wales, Technical Advice Note (Wales) 1 (TAN1) “Joint Housing Land Availability Studies” outlines the procedure for the compilation of these studies. Local Planning Authorities should ensure that sufficient land is genuinely available, or will become available to provide a continuous 5-year supply of land for housing.

4.2.7.

The Welsh Development Agency (Land Division) publishes studies of housing land availability in co-operation with the Council, the Home Builders Federation, Housing Associations and other appropriate bodies. The Study in respect of the Vale of Glamorgan has a base date of 1st April. The Study establishes the number of dwellings likely to be completed within a five-year period and indicates the Vale of Glamorgan land supply.

4.2.8.

Planning Policy Wales, Technical Advise Note (Wales) 2 (TAN 2) “Planning and Affordable Housing” recognises that a community's need for affordable housing is a planning consideration which may be taken into account when formulating development plan policies. The guidance indicates that where there is a need for affordable housing, locally, or throughout the area, a local planning authority may seek to negotiate with developers for the inclusion of an element of affordable housing in a scheme where the site is suitable. A policy can be included in the development plan to this effect and, where appropriate, the willingness of a developer to include an element of affordable housing in accordance with this policy will be a material planning consideration which can be taken in to account when considering an application. Where there are particular difficulties in providing an adequate supply of affordable housing to meet local needs in rural areas, TAN 2 indicates that special provisions can be made to release small sites within and adjoining villages which development plans would not otherwise allocate for housing. The TAN further indicates that such sites will, however, be released as exceptions to normal policies for the provision of housing and, as such, they will not be identified in the Plan.

4.3.

OBJECTIVES

4.3.1.

In order to provide a context for policies relating to housing, the following objectives are put forward:

  • To allocate sufficient land for housing in accordance with the guidance contained in Planning Policy Wales (2002) and the Plan's Strategy in order to accommodate the anticipated housing needs of the Vale.
  • To favour residential developments that are well related to public transport, shopping and leisure facilities, and employment opportunities.
  • To provide for a range of housing choice including a sufficient proportion of one and two bedroom dwellings for smaller households.
  • To secure a range of housing to be provided by the private sector, public sector, and registered social landlords in order to cater for the needs of all residents of the Vale including those not easily able to compete in the existing predominantly private market.
  • To prevent urban sprawl and sporadic housing development in the countryside and to maintain the individual character of individual settlements and the Rural Vale of Glamorgan.
  • To facilitate the improvement and enhancement of those housing areas lacking in amenities and suffering from a poor physical environment.
  • To encourage higher densities whenever such development is practical and in scale and keeping with its surroundings.
4.4.

POLICIES AND PROPOSALS

4.4.1.

Site 1: Barry Waterfront

The comprehensive redevelopment of this site was originally granted outline planning permission for residential, commercial, business, retail, leisure and open space uses in July 1988, by the Secretary of State for Wales. A renewal of the consent was granted in September 1991 and expired in 1994. In October, 1994, the Council resolved to grant outline planning permission for the development of this site subject to the completion of a Section 106 Agreement. This was signed in May 1997. The current site of approximately 77 hectares is owned by Associated British Ports and the proposed redevelopment is a joint venture scheme between Associated British Ports and the Welsh Development Agency. The site includes approximately 25.9 hectares for residential purposes, and at current build densities it is anticipated will yield some 1400 units. A range of residential building types and tenure is proposed including 20% of the total number of residential units for affordable housing. There is currently nothing in the Plan which precludes affordable housing being provided by the private sector. The Environment Agency have advised that the site will need to be protected to a minimum level of 8.3 metres above Ordnance Datum. The Waterfront development accommodates a new infrastructure network, designed and developed in close liaison with all public utilities. Electricity, gas, water and telecommunications can be made available to any development plot from mains running within the adoptable highway zone.

 

4.4.2.

In addition to the comprehensive Redevelopment Site, 5.2 hectares of land at South Quay is allocated for mixed-use development to include residential. It should be noted that this site is not included in the outline planning permission for the waterfront. The South Quay area of No. 1 Dock currently accommodates a number of Operational Chemical Storage Tanks. Remedial works will be necessary in order to ensure the problems of land contamination at the site are correctly  addressed. The Environmental Agency have indicated that prior to any development commencing at the South Quay site a scheme will need to be submitted that demonstrates how the site will be protected to a level of 8.3 metres AOD.

4.4.3.

The site is likely to yield approximately 200 dwellings. The Council is keen to ensure that current development rates at the waterfront are maintained and sufficient land at this location is available throughout the Plan period. Detailed planning permission for the residential development element of this mixed-use scheme will therefore not be granted until 80% beneficial occupation of the residential units on the original Waterfront regeneration area has been achieved.

4.4.4.

The Council will through discussions with developers, seek to secure affordable housing, Public Open Space, landscaping, and contributions for education, recreation, public transport and cycleway provision. The development of the site will be guided by a Development Brief, which is to be produced in partnership with the Council. The purpose of the brief will be to ensure that the development of this site makes an effective and positive contribution to the social, economic and environmental wellbeing of the local community. In addition to a Brief, the Council will require a Traffic Impact Assessment of the site to be undertaken, in order to assess the potential impact of the development on the existing highway network and to identify appropriate transport solutions.

4.4.5.

Site 2: Harbour Road, Barry

This site is between Harbour Road, Broad Street and the existing railway line in Barry. The proposal involves the redevelopment of a redundant British Rail site, which overlooks Parade Gardens and Barry Old Harbour.

4.4.6.
In August, 1996, the Council resolved to grant planning permission subject to the completion of a Section 106 Agreement for 52 units.
4.4.7.

Site 3: Pencoedtre - North East Barry

The proposed housing site at North East Barry forms part of a comprehensive mixed use development which is the subject of the Draft Pencoedtre-North East Barry Strategy. The overall area comprises a wedge of land of approximately 56 hectares, bounded by the Barry Docks Link Road, Coldbrook Road, Channels Girt, Pencoedtre Road, and Port Road. Currently, it is mainly used for pasture and Forestry Commission woodland with some allotment land and a few houses. The allotment land is effectively in pasture and not currently laid out or used as allotments. The Environment Agency have advised that a Greenfield run off restriction may be required for this site. Welsh Water have advised that a watermain crosses the site and protective measures will be required at the developer's expense. 

4.4.8.

The construction of the Barry Docks Link Road has severed the area from the surrounding agricultural land and the remainder of Pencoedtre Wood. This has adversely affected the potential of some of the agricultural land holdings, whilst providing a new and firm boundary for the eastern side of Barry. The Docks Link Road and Port Road, which act as boundaries to the site, offer a direct link to the M4 Motorway via the Peripheral Distributor Road, whilst the construction of the Barry Waterfront to Cardiff Link will provide a high-speed road link to south and central Cardiff. The site is also well related to existing public transport routes. The availability of good communications together with a pleasant environment makes the site ideal for a comprehensive development scheme involving the provision of housing, an employment site, and a business park site identified in Policy EMP 1.

4.4.9.

A maximum of 820 houses could be provided on a phased basis on up to 25 hectares of the site. This will comprise a range of low and medium density dwellings ranging from 25 dwellings per hectare in the more prominent northern part of the site, to around 30-35 dwellings per hectare elsewhere. The Council will require a mix of house types and tenure throughout the site including an element of affordable housing (approximately 60 units). Substantial areas of open space will be provided and a 1.2 hectare site will be reserved for educational purposes. A 3.2 hectare business park, suitable for some 12,077 square metres of high technology and office uses, and light industry (i.e. B1/B8 uses) will also be provided.

4.4.10.

The residential element, business park and public open space element of the scheme has an outline planning consent. Approximately 4 hectares of public open space will be provided (see Policy REC 11(i), including the provision of two 0.4 hectare equipped play areas. In addition, approximately 1.2 hectares will be provided for educational purposes (see policy COMM 3 (i)).

4.4.11.

In addition approximately 14 hectares of land is allocated for mixed-use development of residential, employment and woodland. This allocation will require the revision of the Development Brief for the site which envisages all the site will be for Special Employment. The purpose of the brief will be to ensure that the development of this site protects and enhances the good quality ancient woodland and makes an effective and positive contribution to the social, economic and environmental well being of the local community. The revised Brief will determine both the exact location of the residential, employment and woodland elements and revisit issues such as the provision of affordable housing, Public Open Space, play areas and educational facilities and consider new issues such as sustainable design and recycling. In addition to the Brief a Green Transport Plan must be produced for the site as a whole.

4.4.12.

The sensitive location of the site requires care to be taken in designing the development. The site accommodates a considerable amount of good quality ancient woodland, which needs to be retained as part of any development scheme. The Environment Agency and Countryside Council for Wales have indicated that the woodland on the site is of high wildlife and nature conservation value. A survey of the woodland and appropriate Management Plan will be required prior to the granting of planning permission. In addition Glamorgan Gwent Archaeological Trust have indicated that the site is potentially of importance and therefore an archaeological investigation of the site will be required prior to the commencement of development. Considerable investment is required in transportation and infrastructure and a comprehensive approach to the overall development is essential. Measures would need to be undertaken by any developer to locate and protect a 36-inch diameter high-pressure trunk water main which crosses the site. The main cannot supply the site and therefore extensive off-site main laying will be required leading to high developer's costs. Greenfield drainage restrictions may apply to this site and further consultation with the Environment Agency and the local authority is recommended.

4.4.13.

Site 4: Land to the rear of Daniel Street, Barry

The site comprises an area of unused/overgrown former allotment land elevated to the rear of Westbury Close, Daniel Street, Cae Glas and Robins Lane. The site is an irregular shaped parcel of land with a frontage to Westbury Close. The Environment Agency have advised that a Greenfield run off restriction may be required for this site.

4.4.14.

In April 1994, full planning permission was granted for 17 dwellings (including one block of 4 flats). In November 1994, full planning permission was granted for 15 dwellings.

4.4.15.

The site is likely to be developed by a registered social landlord.

4.4.16.

Site 5: Cwm Barri, Barry

The site is off Pontypridd Road, Barry. Outline planning consent was granted on 17th November 1994, for 11.3 hectares of residential development with 15.8 hectares being transferred to the Council to provide an extension to Porthkerry Country Park (REC 11 (vi)). The site is restricted to a maximum of 24 units per hectare.

4.4.17.

Wimpey (3.3 hectares) and Westbury (2.42 hectares) are currently developing the site for 66 and 74 units respectively. Currently some 5.5 hectares of residential land are available for approximately 130 units. The Environment Agency have advised that a Greenfield run off restriction may be required for this site.

4.4.18.

Site 6: Winston Square, Barry

The redevelopment of Winston Square, Barry involves the demolition of 20 shops and 20 maisonettes. These will be replaced by new retail units built and operated by a private consortium and Newydd Housing Association will be providing 46 (estimated) new houses for rent.

4.4.19.

Site 7: Penarth Haven, Penarth

The Penarth Haven comprehensive redevelopment comprises approximately 24 hectares of land consisting of part of the former Penarth Dock and adjoining area. The development, when completed, will incorporate a public house, leisure and community facilities, commercial and marine industry, boat-related uses, open space, pedestrian boulevard and a riverside promenade/pier.

The Custom House The Oystercatcher, Penarth MarinaDwellings in Penarth Marina

4.4.20.

In October 1990, the Council granted outline planning consent for the comprehensive redevelopment of the site.

4.4.21.

The development of the site is currently ongoing and progress to date includes:

  • construction of the first phase of Plymouth Park;
  • development of a supermarket at the western end of the site;
  • detailed permission for a public house and family restaurants;
  • detailed permission for residential development for sites 5 and 6 (128 units) and site 7 (32 units), granted in December, 1996. 42 units have also been granted on sites 8 and 9 in February 1996.
4.4.22.

Approximately 5.9 hectares will be developed for residential purposes for around 463 flats and houses. The Environment Agency have advised that the site lies within 250 metres of a landfill site. In addition all development must be designed to ensure that it does not encroach into the water storage capacity of Cardiff Bay.

4.4.23.

A development framework for Penarth Haven was published in April 1993 by Cardiff Bay Development Corporation.

4.4.24.

Site 8: Cogan Hall Farm, Penarth

The total site comprises approximately 37 hectares of land adjoining the western boundary of Lower Penarth and the northern boundary of Cosmeston Lakes Country Park. The Land Authority for Wales owns the majority of this land, which is predominantly farm land of grades 3b/3c. A proposed development strategy is shown on the Proposals Map.

4.4.25.

Land west of Lower Penarth was the subject of debate at the East Vale Local Plan Inquiry (January/February 1986). The report of the Inquiry into objections to the Local Plan concluded that:

“ there are no special circumstances at present which justify inclusion of this land within the residential boundaries nor within policy H2.”

The report, however, further stated that

“It was conceded by the Council that this could be an area of search in the event of additional land being needed for housing development in the future.”

4.4.26.

Apart from the land at Penarth Haven, which has been granted planning permission, this area is considered to be the only remaining site in the Penarth area suitable for future residential development of moderate size. 

4.4.27.

It is envisaged that the housing site will occupy approximately 15 hectares of land to the east of Mile End Lane. Some 400 dwellings could be provided on a phased basis. This will comprise a range of housing types, densities and tenures and should include an element of affordable housing. Two areas of informal open space will be provided totaling 3.6 hectares.

4.4.28.

Ownership of land to the west of the allocated housing site and other appropriate sites will be transferred from the Land Authority for Wales to the Council thereby providing extensions to Cosmeston Lakes Country Park. This will form an effective barrier to any further westward development of Penarth.

4.4.29.

In his notice of approval for the South Glamorgan Structure Plan (4th June, 1980) the Secretary of State for Wales commented:

“It is essential to avoid urban sprawl and the fusion of built up areas of Cardiff, Penarth, Barry and Dinas Powys.”

This view was reaffirmed by the Secretary of State in his notice of approval for the first review of the Structure Plan in 1989. It is considered that the sensitive development of this site and transfer of land as an extension to the Country Park will assist in the long-term protection of the strategic open space between Penarth and Dinas Powys. In addition, the site is considered to be well related to existing and future public transport options as well as the existing road network.

4.4.30.

In October 1997, the Council granted outline-planning consent for the comprehensive development of this site. A Section 106 Agreement covers the extension of the Country Park, the provision of informal open space and affordable housing. A brief for the development of the site was required as part of the conditional outline planning approval. A document has now been prepared jointly by the Council and the Land Authority for Wales to meet this requirement. The Council will use the Brief in the determination of all subsequent detailed planning applications.

4.4.31.

Site 9: Cogan Pill Road, Llandough

This 0.4 hectare site was granted outline planning permission in October 1984 for the construction of 6 "mobility" flats for the elderly and 12 “Category 1” flats for the elderly. This consent has now expired. The site is close to the site of a Roman Villa and large early medieval cemetery. There is a likelihood of archaeological features being present and an evaluation will be required. In addition, the Environment Agency has advised that a greenfield run-off restriction may be required.

4.4.32.

Site 10: Redwood Close, Boverton

This 0.65 hectare site was originally granted planning permission in March 1985 for housing association use. The original permission allowed for 25 sheltered units on the site. The Environment Agency have advised that a Greenfield run off restriction may be required for this site.

4.4.33.

Site 11: The Coal Yard, Llantwit Major

This site comprises a triangular piece of land situated between the Vale of Glamorgan Railway Line and the rear gardens of 3 detached dwellings which front Boverton Road. The site is currently used as a coal yard and has a frontage onto Le Pouliguen Way. The site has the benefit of an outline planning permission (granted May 1999). The Environment Agency have advised that a greenfield runoff restriction may be required.

4.4.34.

Site 12: Cowbridge Road and the Saw Mill, Ystradowen

This 4.5-hectare site lies between the existing southern extremity of Ystradowen and north of a dismantled railway line. It is bounded to the west by Cowbridge Road. All of the site has outline planning consent and 3.52 hectares has detailed consent. A maximum of 109 units will be constructed with 12 of these being 'affordable' units. A 0.12 hectare site will be provided for a recreation facility and financial contributions will be made by the developers for children's play facilities and a kickabout area.

4.4.35.

Site 13: Rhoose Point

The housing site at Rhoose forms part of a comprehensive mixed-use redevelopment on land currently in the ownership of Blue Circle Industries Plc. This is shown on the Proposals Map. In addition to housing, the scheme includes the provision of leisure, retailing and employment uses together with large areas of public open space. Primary access to the site is to the east of the existing built up area. It should be noted that the site lies within 250 metres of a landfill site.

4.4.36.

Currently the urban area of Rhoose is separated from the coastline by virtue of the quarrying that has taken place. The overall redevelopment scheme proposed for the area has the dual advantage of bringing derelict land back into use, coupled with an opportunity to integrate the settlement of Rhoose with its coastline. The site is also well located for existing and future public transport opportunities and is well related to the road network. Blue Circle's total landholding comprises some 97 hectares which up to 20 hectares could be used for residential purposes. It is envisaged that approximately 500 dwellings in 3 distinct physical areas be provided on a phased basis. This will comprise a range of housing types, densities and tenures and should include an element of affordable housing.

4.4.37.

In July 1994, the Council resolved to grant an outline planning consent for the comprehensive development of this site subject to Section 106 Agreements concerning open space provision, site infrastructure etc. This agreement was signed on the 27th March 1996.

4.4.38.

Reclamation of the site has already started and this is envisaged to take at least 2 years, with development not starting until this process has been completed.

4.4.39.

Site 14: Mayflower Site, Rhoose

This site is located in the village of Rhoose with a frontage adjacent to the Mayflower Hotel on the northern side of Fontygary Road. The land comprises open field to the rear of a disused crazy golf course, part of which is used as a recreational area for the public house. Detailed planning consent for 22 units on the site was allowed on appeal in January 1996 and a revised consent for 22 units was granted on 10th December 1997.

4.4.40.

Site 15: Marine Drive, Ogmore-by-Sea

This site was originally granted planning consent in March 1976. Since then a total of 59 units have been completed. There is an undeveloped area at the southern end of the development of approximately 0.6 hectares. In July 1997, a detailed planning application for 6 detached units was approved by the Council. The Environment Agency has advised that a greenfield run-off restriction may be required.

4.4.41.

Site 16: Adjacent St. Michaels Church, Colwinston

A 0.58 hectare site situated at the western end of Colwinston to the north of the church. The site was originally granted outline planning consent in October 1985, for 10 detached dwellings, receiving detailed planning consent in June 1989 and again in October 2001. The site is located adjacent to a medieval graveyard which may have been larger. There may also be evidence of a medieval village and so an archaeological evaluation will be required. The Environment Agency has advised that a greenfield run-off restriction may be required.

4.4.42.

Site 17: The Limes, Cowbridge

This site was originally allocated for housing in the adopted Cowbridge Local Plan. The site comprises 0.12 hectares and offers advantages as a location for small retirement homes. Lying within the Conservation Area, a high standard of design and layout will be required in any development proposal submitted. Welsh Water has indicated that the Cowbridge Sewage Treatment Works is at capacity and that this may cause a problem for the development of the site. In addition, the Environment Agency has advised that a greenfield run off restriction may be required.

4.4.43.

Site 18: River Walk, Cowbridge

The site lies to the south west of the main shopping area in Cowbridge, backing onto the River Thaw. Two parcels of land are available at this location for a total of six units. The sites are 0.85 hectares and 0.284 hectares in size and are considered suitable for 2 and 4 detached units respectively. Welsh Water have stated that the Cowbridge Sewage Treatment Works is at capacity and this may cause a problem for the development of this site. In addition, the Environment Agency have advised that a greenfield run off restriction may be required. The site is outside the medieval walled town but may contain archaeological features, therefore an archaeological evaluation is recommended.

4.4.44.

Site 19: White Farm, Barry

The 12.6 hectare greenfield site is allocated for residential and recreational purposes. The residential element of the site will comprise 5.2 hectares of land with the remaining 7.4 hectares of land allocated as informal open space.

4.4.45.

The site was originally designated in the Adopted Barry Local Plan (1983) and the Vale of Glamorgan Local Plan, Deposit Draft (as amended) 1995 for informal open space. However, a certificate of appropriate alternative development for residential purposes was granted on the majority of the site in June 1994, subject to a number of conditions, including limitations on the points of access, landscaping details, finished levels and drainage.

4.4.46.

It is anticipated that the development of this site for residential purposes will result in the construction of 130 dwellings, including affordable housing built at a density of 25 units to the hectare. The Council may through discussions with the owners/developers of the site seek to secure the transfer of the 7.4 hectares of recreational land to the authority for the provision of footpath linkages and nature conservation issues. The development of this site will be guided by a Development Brief, which will be produced in partnership with the Council.

4.4.47.

Welsh Water have indicated that extensive off site water mains would be required to serve the site. The cost of providing these services would be borne by the developer. Glamorgan Gwent Archaeological Trust have indicated that an archaeological field evaluation will be required at the site prior to the granting of planning permission. In addition the Environment Agency have indicated that a greenfield run-off restriction may also apply to the site.

4.4.48.

Site 20: Llandough Fields, Penarth

The site comprises a linear shaped area which the Inspector considered had the characteristics of brownfield land. The site is approximately 3.4 hectares in size, located between the River Ely and the railway sidings to the north of the settlement of Penarth. The site is visually part of the Cardiff Bay area.

4.4.49.

The development of the site for residential purposes is expected to result in the creation of approximately 65 units. The Council will through negotiations seek to secure affordable housing, landscaping, open space and cycle paths and contributions for the delivery and land accessibility to public transportation services. The development of the site will be guided by a Development Brief, which is to be produced in partnership with the Council. In addition to the Brief the Council will re quire a Traffic Impact Assessment of the site to be undertaken, in order to assess the potential impact of the development on the existing highway network and to identify potential transportation solutions.

4.4.50.

The Environment Agency has indicated that development of the site below the 8-metre contour line is inappropriate because it may exacerbate flooding risk in the area. In addition they have indicated that prior to any development proceeding, an Otter survey will be required to establish whether this area is used for "lying up". The methodology for the survey will need to be agreed in advance with both the Environment Agency and the Council. Glamorgan Gwent Archaeological Trust have indicated that the site may be of archaeological interest. In order to assess the importance of the site an archaeological evaluation will be required prior to the granting of planning permission.

4.4.51.

Site 21: Palmersvale Business Centre, Barry

The site is located at the junction of Arthur Street and Palmerston Road, immediately adjacent to Palmerston Trading Estate. It is anticipated that the development of the 1 hectare site will yield 20 residential units. The Health and Safety Executive has indicated that part of the South Eastern edge of the site overlaps with the Public Information Zone for Barry Chemicals complex. In view of the sensitive location of the site, the Council considers that the most appropriate way to guide development on the site is through a Development Brief. The Brief will be produced in partnership with the Council and will address issues such as site layout, dwelling type and designs, landscaping, open space and access arrangements.

4.4.52.

Site 22: Land North of Railway Line, Rhoose

The site comprises 26 hectares of greenfield land located between the existing settlement of Rhoose and the Rhoose Point development. It is anticipated that the site will yield approximately 400 units during the Plan period (1996 - 2011) and 200 units during the next Plan period (2011 - 2026). The Council is keen to ensure that anticipated development rates at the Rhoose Point site are achieved and that sufficient land at this location is available throughout this Plan period and the next. Therefore planning permission for the development of this site will not be granted until 80% beneficial occupation of the residential units on the Rhoose Point site has been achieved.

4.4.53.

The Council will through discussions with the site owners/developers seek to secure affordable housing, Public Open Space, children's play areas, appropriate landscaping and  contribution/provision for educational, recreational, community and public transportation provision. The development of the site will be guided by a Development Brief, which will be produced in partnership with the Council, the purpose of the brief will be to ensure a comprehensive approach to the development of the site. It is essential that the development of this significant site makes an effective and positive contribution to the social, economic and environmental wellbeing of the local community. In addition to a Development Brief, the Council will require a Traffic Impact Assessment of the site to be undertaken in order to assess the potential impact of the development on the existing highway network and to identify appropriate transportation solutions.

4.4.54.

Glamorgan Gwent Archaeological Trust have indicated that the site may be of archaeological value and that a desk top survey of the site should be submitted as part of any planning application. Dwr Cymru Welsh Water's Capital Investment to enable this site to proceed is considered to be long term. Development of this site in advance of the planned improvements would need to be subject to an appropriate planning agreement, to be agreed prior to the granting of planning permission. This approach would, therefore, ensure that essential water and sewerage facilities are in place. The Environment Agency has indicated that the site is located on a major aquifer of high vulnerability. Therefore, no discharge of foul or contaminated run-off must be made to ground. The Agency will need to be consulted prior to any works being undertaken at the site to discuss the necessary measures required to protect the aquifer.

4.4.55.

In addition to the housing allocation outlined above there is potential for residential development in Cowbridge on land to the north of the Town Hall. The site comprises two parcels of land, one measuring approximately 11 ha. and the other approximately 1 ha. The larger parcel consists of open land in recreational use surrounding a leisure centre. In the south east corner of the site there is also a small area of ponds and meadow which is in use as a private wild fowl reserve. Both sites are bounded by the A48 Cowbridge Bypass to the north and by residential development to the east, south and west. The sites lie within the Cowbridge and Llanblethian Conservation Area where special attention should be given to the desirability of preserving or enhancing its character and appearance. Both sites are situated within the residential settlement boundary for Cowbridge.

4.4.56.

The Environment Agency has advised that the 1 ha site is part of the flood plain of the River Thaw and that it has been identified as an area of potential flood storage as part of the flood alleviation scheme for Cowbridge and Llanblethian. The Environment Agency has stated that development of this site would be inappropriate and likely to hinder future proposals for flood alleviation measures for the Cowbridge and Llanblethian area. In respect of the 11ha site, the Environment Agency has advised that it is located on a major aquifer of high vulnerability and therefore no discharge of foul or contaminated run-off must be made to ground. The Agency will need to be consulted prior to any works being undertaken at the site to discuss the necessary measures required to protect the aquifer.

4.4.57.

Dwr Cymru Welsh Water's Capital Investment to enable this site to proceed is considered to be long term. Development of this site in advance of the planned improvements would be subject to appropriate Planning Agreements (i.e. Section 106) to be agreed before planning is approved to ensure that essential water and sewerage facilities are in place.

4.4.58.

Glamorgan Gwent Archaeological Trust has indicated that the site may contain archaeology of national importance. In order to determine this a field evaluation will be necessary prior to the determination of any planning application.

4.4.59.

In addition to the constraints already outlined, land ownership further complicates the development of the site, with 2.5 hectares being owned by the Council and the remaining land being in multiple private ownership.

4.4.60.

It is considered that the development of some of the land within the larger site for residential purposes could provide the balance of the housing land requirements for the Vale of Glamorgan in the latter part of the Plan period. However, because of the potential constraints to development, the Council considers that proposals for the development of both sites will need to be the subject of a comprehensive development brief and management plan. The purpose of the brief will be to ensure
that the development of this site makes an effective and positive contribution to the social, economic and environmental wellbeing of the local community. The development plan will need to address affordable housing, sustainable design, pedestrian and cycle links, landscaping, nature conservation and highway issues. Access arrangements to the site must be informed by a Traffic Impact Assessment in order to assess the potential impact of the development on the existing highway network and to identify appropriate transportation solutions. In addition the Council will, through negotiations with developers, seek to secure contributions for educational and recreational provision.

POLICY HOUS 2 - ADDITIONAL RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT

HOUSING INFILL, SMALL-SCALE DEVELOPMENT AND REDEVELOPMENT WHICH MEETS THE CRITERIA LISTED IN POLICY HOUS 8 WILL BE PERMITTED WITHIN THE SETTLEMENT BOUNDARIES OF THE FOLLOWING:

URBAN SETTLEMENTS OF:

BARRY
COWBRIDGE WITH LLANBLETHIAN
DINAS POWYS
LLANDOUGH (PENARTH)
LLANTWIT MAJOR
PENARTH
SULLY

RURAL SETTLEMENTS OF:

ABERTHIN
BONVILSTON
BROUGHTON
COLWINSTON
CORNTOWN
EAST ABERTHAW
EGLWYS BREWIS
EWENNY
GRAIG PENLLYN
LLANBETHERY
LLANCARFAN
LLANDOW
LLANMAES
LLYSWORNEY
OGMORE BY SEA
PENLLYN
PETERSTON-SUPER-ELY
RHOOSE
ST. ATHAN
ST. BRIDES MAJOR
ST. NICHOLAS
SIGINGSTONE
SOUTHERNDOWN
TREOES
TRERHYNGYLL
WENVOE
WICK
YSTRADOWEN

FAVOURABLE CONSIDERATION WILL BE GIVEN, OTHER THAN WITHIN AREAS IDENTIFIED AS GREEN WEDGES, TO SMALL-SCALE DEVELOPMENT WHICH CONSTITUTES THE “ROUNDING OFF” OF THE EDGE OF SETTLEMENT BOUNDARIES WHERE IT CAN BE SHOWN TO BE CONSISTENT WITH THE PROVISIONS OF POLICY HOUS 8 AND PARTICULARLY CRITERION (i).

4.4.61.

The settlement boundaries for the villages contained in Policy HOUS 2 are illustrated on the Proposals Map.

4.4.62.

In Policy HOUS 1 above, sufficient land is allocated for new residential development to meet the Vale's requirements to the year 2011. In order to prevent the spread of new development outside the confines of these existing communities, settlement boundaries have been drawn around the existing urban areas and around the rural villages of the Vale. The aim of this policy is to protect the rural areas around and between the existing settlements, to prevent urban sprawl and to avoid the fusion of adjoining settlements. Other countryside protection policies are contained within the Environment Chapter. Policies ENV 1 and ENV 3 are particularly relevant. In respect of appropriate housing development in the rural villages outlined in Policy HOUS 2, reference should be made to Policy HOUS 13 on Exception Sites for Affordable Housing in the Rural Vale.

4.4.63.

The Council considers only those villages listed under Policy HOUS 2 to have sufficient physical form and capacity to assimilate further infill development without it having a detrimental impact on their existing character and environment. An infill plot is defined as a site enclosed or surrounded by existing development in the sense of the filling of a small gap within an otherwise built up frontage. All site boundaries should be existing man made or natural physical features. Arbitrary lines drawn for the convenience of plot size do not qualify as such. The fact that an infill site exists, however, does not mean this will automatically receive planning permission. Small scale rounding off, which for the purpose of this Plan is defined as development which constitutes no more than five dwellings, may also be permitted where the site lies within or immediately adjacent to the settlementboundary and conforms to a logical site boundary. All site boundaries should be existing man made or natural physical features. Arbitrary lines drawn for the convenience of plot size do not qualify as such. Each proposal, if accepted as infilling or rounding off will be assessed against the policy criteria and will need to be considered in the context of the relationship to areas of attractive landscape, high quality townscape and areas of historical, archaeological or ecological importance. (See also HOUS 13 on Exception Sites for Affordable Housing in the Rural Vale).

POLICY HOUS 3 - DWELLINGS IN THE COUNTRYSIDE

SUBJECT TO THE PROVISIONS OF POLICY HOUS 2 THE ERECTION OF NEW DWELLINGS IN THE COUNTRYSIDE WILL BE RESTRICTED TO THOSE THAT CAN BE JUSTIFIED IN THE INTERESTS OF AGRICULTURE AND FORESTRY.

4.4.64.

If the countryside is to remain undeveloped and its attractive appearance protected, new residential development outside those rural settlements referred to in Policy HOUS 2 must be strictly controlled. (See also Policy ENV 1).

4.4.65.

New housing outside villages and towns often creates unacceptable intrusions into the rural landscape. New dwellings in the countryside can also place an unacceptable burden on local services.

4.4.66.

Those rural villages not identified in Policy HOUS 2 are considered not to have sufficient physical form or capacity to assimilate new residential development without having a detrimental impact on their existing character and environment. Additional residential development in certain villages will not be permitted in order to protect their character and appearance. Consequently these have been excluded from Policy HOUS 2. Furthermore, the many groups of scattered and loose knit buildings in the Rural Vale cannot be regarded as settlements under the terms of Policy HOUS 2. These are little more than pockets of dwellings and farmsteads lying in isolation in the countryside. Additional dwellings would be inappropriate in these locations unless justified in the interests of agriculture or forestry.

4.4.67.

Wherever possible, dwellings for agricultural and forestry workers should be located within settlements in the locality. However, the Council recognises that in certain circumstances, agricultural dwellings need to be located away from the existing settlements. Proposals for such dwellings will be determined according to the criteria set out in Policy HOUS 5.

POLICY HOUS 4 - NEW SETTLEMENTS

PROPOSALS FOR NEW SETTLEMENTS WILL NOT BE PERMITTED.

4.4.68.

New settlements are defined as substantial (more than 1000 new dwelling units) freestanding villages or small towns. Through the UDP the Council has allocated (together with existing commitments) sufficient land for residential purposes to meet the estimated demand for new dwellings. The demand will be met by the logical expansion of existing settlements e.g. Cogan Hall Farm, Penarth and Pencoedtre, Barry (Policies HOUS 1 (8) and (3)) and by the regeneration of brownfield sites e.g. Barry Waterfront, Penarth Haven and Rhoose Point (Policies HOUS 1 (1), (7) and (13)). Consequently, there is not considered to be a requirement for new settlements within the Vale during the Plan Period.

POLICY HOUS 5 - AGRICULTURAL OR FORESTRY DWELLINGS

THE DEVELOPMENT OF NEW DWELLINGS BEYOND THE IDENTIFIED SETTLEMENT BOUNDARIES DESIGNATED BY POLICIES HOUS 2 IN ASSOCIATION WITH AGRICULTURE OR FORESTRY WILL BE PERMITTED IF:

  1. AN ESSENTIAL NEED, BASED ON A FUNCTIONAL AND WHERE APPROPRIATE FINANCIAL NECESSITY IS CLEARLY DEMONSTRATED;
  2. THE SCALE, SITING, DESIGN, LANDSCAPING AND EXTERNAL APPEARANCE OF THE PROPOSED NEW DWELLING IS COMPATIBLE WITH ANY EXISTING RELATED STRUCTURES AND THE SURROUNDING LANDSCAPE; AND
  3. AN ACCEPTABLE ACCESS TO THE DWELLING CAN BE PROVIDED.

IF THESE CRITERIA ARE MET A CONDITION WILL BE IMPOSED ON ALL NEW AGRICULTURE/ FORESTRY DWELLINGS LIMITING THE OCCUPATION OF THE DWELLING TO A PERSON SOLELY, OR MAINLY, WORKING, OR LAST WORKING IN THE LOCALITY, IN AGRICULTURE AS DEFINED IN SECTION 336 OF THE TOWN AND COUNTRY PLANNING ACT 1990, OR IN FORESTRY OR A WIDOW OR WIDOWER OF SUCH A PERSON, AND TO ANY RESIDENT DEPENDANTS.

4.4.69.

Applications for new agricultural or forestry dwellings will need to demonstrate that the intention of the applicants to engage in agriculture or forestry is genuine, and will materialise and be capable of being sustained. It should also be shown that no other practical alternative dwellings are available in the locality and the needs of the enterprise in terms of labour and the efficient running of the business render the dwelling essential. Applicants will need to show that the proposed dwelling is likely to be undertaken and be sustainable in the long term. The Council will seek professional advice to assess the viability of existing and proposed agricultural and forestry business activities where required. The history of the landholding will also be taken into consideration.

4.4.70.

Planning Policy Wales 2002 states that when determining planning applications for agricultural and forestry dwellings, the following matters should be considered;

  • a functional test to establish whether, for the proper functioning of the enterprise (in terms of both its current and likely future requirements), one or more workers needs to be readily available at most times; and
  • a financial test to establish that the farming enterprise is economically viable, since if it is not, new permanent accommodation cannot be justified on agricultural grounds, and to provide evidence of the size of dwelling which the unit can sustain.
4.4.71.

Where permission is to be granted for a new agricultural or forestry dwelling, occupancy conditions will be imposed on the dwelling itself and may also be imposed on existing dwellings and/or on the business unit which are under the control of the applicant and need, at the time of application, to be used in conjunction with the unit. Planning obligations may also be used, where appropriate, to tie a farmhouse to adjacent farm buildings to prevent them being sold separately without further application to the Council. The size of the proposed dwelling must not be unduly large relative to the needs of the unit or the ability of the enterprise to provide an income to sustain it.

POLICY HOUS 6 - AGRICULTURAL OCCUPANCY CONDITIONS

APPLICATIONS FOR THE REMOVAL OF AGRICULTURAL OCCUPANCY CONDITIONS WILL BE CONSIDERED ON THE BASIS OF REALISTIC ASSESSMENTS OF THE CONTINUING NEED FOR THEIR RETENTION.

4.4.72.

The need for an agricultural dwelling relates to an area as a whole and it is not restricted to a particular holding. Proposals to remove agricultural occupancy conditions should normally include evidence that the dwelling has been offered for sale over a sustained period at a price to reflect the occupancy condition. Unless a property is advertised for sale at a realistic price it will be difficult to judge whether such a need exists and therefore whether the condition should be discharged.

POLICY HOUS 7 - REPLACEMENT AND EXTENSION OF DWELLINGS

THE REPLACEMENT OR EXTENSION OF DWELLINGS IN THE COUNTRYSIDE WILL BE STRICTLY CONTROLLED. PROPOSALS WILL BE PERMITTED IF ALL OF THE FOLLOWING CRITERIA ARE MET:

  1. THE EXTENDED DWELLING IS NOT DISPROPORTIONATE IN SIZE TO THE ORIGINAL DWELLING; 
  2. ADEQUATE UTILITY AND INFRUSTRUCTURE SERVICES EXIST, ARE READILY AVAILABLE OR CAN BE ECONOMICALLY PROVIDED;
  3. THE REPLACEMENT DWELLING OR DWELLING AS EXTENDED DOES NOT REQUIRE AN UNACCEPTABLE EXTENSION OF THE EXISTING RESIDENTIAL CURTILAGE;
  4. IN RESPECT OF REPLACEMENT DWELLINGS, PARKING AND AMENITY SPACE IS PROVIDED IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE COUNCIL'S APPROVED GUIDELINES;
  5. THE SCALE, SITING, DESIGN, MATERIALS, LANDSCAPING AND EXTERNAL APPEARANCE OF THE REPLACEMENT DWELLING OR EXTENSION IS COMPATIBLE WITH ANY EXISTING RELATED STRUCTURES AND THE SURROUNDING LANDSCAPE; AND
  6. IN THE CASE OF REPLACEMENT DWELLINGS FOR DERELICT BUILDINGS, THE RESIDENTIAL USE OF THE BUILDING HAS NOT BEEN ABANDONED.
4.4.73.

Whilst it is intended to limit new development and to restrict isolated new dwellings in the countryside, the Council accepts that it would be unreasonable to reject all proposals relating to existing properties. Owners (or prospective purchasers) of dwellings located outside established settlements may wish to replace, or extend their properties particularly where the buildings are substandard or inadequate for the living requirements of the occupier. The Council wishes to ensure that such proposals are appropriate and that they reflect the character of their rural location both in terms of appearance and scale.

4.4.74.

Where the total demolition and replacement of an existing property is proposed, applicants will be required to produce a detailed structural survey of the existing building and evidence will need to be shown of the need to replace/rebuild. If the existing dwelling is derelict, planning permission for a replacement dwelling on the site will not normally be granted except in cases where the dereliction is the result of recent accidental damage (e.g. a fire) to an inhabited property, or where it can be demonstrated that the residential use of the building has not been abandoned.

4.4.74.

The exterior design, materials, and scale of the new dwelling shall have due regard to its own location as well as any neighbouring developments. Proposals for replacement dwellings will only be permitted where it can be demonstrated that the development will be of a scale and character compatible with its local environment.

4.4.76.

Extensions to dwellings in the countryside can also appear incongruous and these will be strictly controlled in terms of their scale, design and appearance to reflect their rural location.

4.4.77.

Where planning permission has been granted for the replacement, or extension of an existing dwelling in the countryside, planning conditions may be imposed restricting permitted development rights in respect of additional extensions and alterations. This is intended to prevent the subsequent erosion of the rural character of the countryside.

POLICY HOUS 8 - RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT CRITERIA - POLICY HOUS 2 SETTLEMENTS

SUBJECT TO THE PROVISIONS OF POLICY HOUS 2, DEVELOPMENT WILL BE PERMITTED WHICH IS WITHIN OR CLOSELY RELATED TO THE DEFINED SETTLEMENT BOUNDARIES PROVIDED THAT IT MEETS ALL THE FOLLOWING CRITERIA:

  1. THE SCALE, FORM AND CHARACTER OF THE PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT IS SYMPATHETIC TO THE ENVIRONS OF THE SITE; 
  2. THE PROPOSAL HAS NO UNACCEPTABLE EFFECT ON THE AMENITY AND CHARACTER OF EXISTING OR NEIGHBOURING ENVIRONMENTS OF NOISE, TRAFFIC CONGESTION, EXACERBATION OF PARKING PROBLEMS OR VISUAL INTRUSION;
  3. THE PROPOSAL DOES NOT HAVE AN UNACCEPTABLE IMPACT ON GOOD QUALITY AGRICULTURAL LAND (GRADES 1, 2 AND 3A), ON AREAS OF ATTRACTIVE LANDSCAPE OR HIGH QUALITY TOWNSCAPE OR ON AREAS OF HISTORICAL, ARCHAEOLOGICAL OR ECOLOGICAL IMPORTANCE;
  4. WHEN APPROPRIATE AND FEASIBLE THE PROVISIONS OF POLICY REC 3 ARE MET;
  5. THE PROVISION OF CAR PARKING AND AMENITY SPACE IS IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE COUNCIL'S APPROVED GUIDELINES;
  6. ADEQUATE COMMUNITY AND UTILITY SERVICES EXIST, ARE REASONABLY ACCESSIBLE OR CAN BE READILY AND ECONOMICALLY PROVIDED.
4.4.78.

The aim of this policy is to stop inappropriate development within urban areas and town cramming. For the purpose of this policy town cramming is defined as insensitive infilling or development which through its cumulative effects will damage the character or amenity of an area. Infill/rounding off development may be permitted in accordance with Policy HOUS 2 subject to compliance with the above criteria. Proposals which result in over development of existing residential areas and/or loss of open space which provide an important setting for towns or villages or has public amenity nature conservation or recreational value will be resisted. The Council's requirements for the provision of open space are set out in Policy REC 3.

POLICY HOUS 9 - CONVERSION OF LARGE DWELLINGS

THE CONVERSION OF LARGE DWELLINGS INTO SMALL SELF-CONTAINED DWELLING UNITS WILL BE PERMITTED IF:

  1. THE SCALE AND FORM OF THE PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT IS IN KEEPING WITH SURROUNDING USES; 
  2. THE PROPOSAL HAS NO UNACCEPTABLE EFFECT ON THE AMENITY AND CHARACTER OF EXISTING OR NEIGHBOURING ENVIRONMENTS BY VIRTUE OF NOISE, TRAFFIC CONGESTION, EXACERBATION OF PARKING PROBLEMS OR VISUAL INTRUSION; AND
  3. THE PROVISION OF CAR PARKING AND AMENITY SPACE IS IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE COUNCIL'S APPROVED GUIDELINES.
4.4.79.

Particularly within the larger settlements there are a number of large older houses which may no longer be appropriate for today's needs. This policy favours the renovation of the existing house stock, subject to certain criteria, thereby helping to reduce the level of under-occupation of dwellings.

POLICY HOUS 10 - NURSING HOMES

PROPOSALS FOR THE ERECTION OF OR EXTENSION TO, RESIDENTIAL CARE AND NURSING HOMES WITHIN CLASS C2* OF THE TOWN AND COUNTRY PLANNING (USE CLASSES) ORDER 1987, (AS AMENDED) AND FOR CONVERSION OF PRIVATE RESIDENCES, HOTELS AND GUEST HOUSES AND OTHER BUILDINGS TO SUCH USES WILL ONLY BE PERMITTED IF ALL OF THE FOLLOWING CRITERIA ARE MET:

  1. THERE ARE NO UNACCEPTABLE EFFECTS ON THE AMENITY OR CHARACTER OF THE AREA BY REASON OF TRAFFIC GENERATION OR LOSS OF PRIVACY TO ADJOINING PROPERTIES;
  2. THE PROPOSAL DOES NOT CREATE UNACCEPTABLE DANGERS AND NUISANCE CAUSED BY THE VOLUME AND PROXIMITY OF TRAFFIC ON ADJACENT ROADS;
  3. THE SCALE, LAYOUT AND APPEARANCE OF THE PROPOSAL REFLECTS THE CHARACTER OF THE LOCALITY;
  4. THE DENSITY OF OCCUPATION, THAT IS THE NUMBER OF RESIDENTS, IS COMPATIBLE WITH SURROUNDING LAND USES;
  5. THE PROPOSAL PROVIDES FOR PEDESTRIAN ACCESS WITHIN THE SITE AND FROM THE STREET;
  6. OPEN SPACE IS PROVIDED IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE COUNCIL'S APPROVED STANDARDS;
  7. CAR PARKING AND AMENITY SPACE PROVISION IS IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE COUNCIL'S APPROVED GUIDELINES;
  8. ACCESS ARRANGEMENTS ALLOW THE SAFE MANOEUVRING OF CARS, AMBULANCES AND VANS;
  9. THE PROPOSAL IS IN CLOSE PROXIMITY TO LOCAL SERVICES SUCH AS SHOPS AND BUS STOPS;
  10. ADEQUATE COMMUNITY, INFRASTRUCTURE AND UTILITY SERVICES EXIST, ARE REASONABLY ACCESSIBLE OR CAN BE READILY AND ECONOMICALLY PROVIDED;
  11. ADEQUATE FACILITIES ARE AVAILABLE FOR THE SATISFACTORY DISPOSAL OF CLINICAL WASTE.

*C2 - Residential Institutions as defined by the Town and Country Planning (Use Classes) Order 1987. 

4.4.80.

Residential institutions in Class C2 of the Town and Country Planning (Use Classes) Order 1987 (as amended) refer to residential accommodation and care for people in need. Care is defined in Article 2 of the Order as “personal care for people in need of such care by reason of old age, disablement, past or present dependence on alcohol or drugs or past and present mental disorder, and Class C2 also includes the personal care of children and medical care and treatment.”

POLICY HOUS 11 - RESIDENTIAL PRIVACY AND SPACE

EXISTING RESIDENTIAL AREAS CHARACTERISED BY HIGH STANDARDS OF PRIVACY AND SPACIOUSNESS WILL BE PROTECTED AGAINST OVER DEVELOPMENT AND INSENSITIVE OR INAPPROPRIATE INFILLING.

4.4.81.

This policy aims to protect existing high quality housing areas from over development or insensitive or inappropriate infilling. A similar policy was introduced by the Secretary of State for Wales in his approval of the South Glamorgan Structure Plan Proposals for Alteration No. 1 in 1989. Account should also be taken of the Council's Approved Amenity Standards.

POLICY HOUS 12 - AFFORDABLE HOUSING

THE COUNCIL WILL WHERE THERE IS A DEMONSTRABLE NEED, SEEK TO NEGOTIATE WITH DEVELOPERS FOR THE INCLUSION OF A REASONABLE ELEMENT OF AFFORDABLE HOUSING IN SUBSTANTIAL DEVELOPMENT SCHEMES. CLEAR AND ADEQUATE ARRANGEMENTS SHOULD BE MADE TO ENSURE THAT THE BENEFITS OF SUCH HOUSING ARE SECURED FOR INITIAL AND SUBSEQUENT OCCUPANTS.

4.4.82.

For the purposes of this Policy a substantial development is defined as a housing development of more than 50 units. Affordable housing is defined in Technical Advice Note (Wales) 2 'Planning and Affordable Housing' to encompass both low cost, market and subsidised housing (irrespective of tenure, exclusive or shared ownership, or financial arrangements) that will be available to people who cannot afford to occupy houses generally available on the open market.

4.4.83.

The level of affordability will vary over geographical areas and over time according to incomes and the operation of the local housing market.

4.4.84.

The Council's Housing Strategy aims to ensure that as far as resources permit, residents occupy accommodation which is adequate for their needs in terms of size, fitness for occupation and cost. This will be achieved largely through the coordination of policies and proposals aimed at providing affordable housing in the Council's Housing Strategy and Operation Programme (HSOP) and the Vale of Glamorgan Unitary Development Plan.

4.4.85.

The starting point for the provision of affordable housing will be an assessment of the level and geographical distribution of housing need in the Vale, initially utilising existing information on housing need derived from housing waiting lists, the 1991 Census and other relevant information from the housing associations operating within the Vale. A wider assessment of housing need in the former Borough Council's area was undertaken by consultants in 1994 and the results from this survey assists in forming a more comprehensive means of identifying the level and geographical distribution of housing need. This will take into account house prices and market rents, the size and needs of households and their ability by income to support affordable housing.

4.4.86.

The bulk of affordable housing provision will be made in the urban areas of the Vale and in particular Barry and Penarth. There are a number of ways that affordable housing may be delivered through the Unitary Development Plan particularly in urban areas, including the conversion of under used space over shops and offices into flats, the conversion of existing buildings into flats and through higher density developments which may make it easier for a developer to provide smaller affordable market units.

4.4.87.

The best way of securing new affordable housing units will be through the inclusion of a mix and balance of house types and sizes in large new housing developments to cater for a range of housing needs. Eighty units of social housing have previously been secured as part of the development brief produced by Cardiff Bay Development Corporation for the comprehensive redevelopment of Penarth Dock. The comprehensive redevelopment of Barry Waterfront, the developments at North East Barry, Cogan Hall Farm, Penarth, and the Cowbridge Road/Sawmill Site, Ystradowen will also offer opportunities for the provision of affordable housing. The proximity of these sites to existing and proposed services such as shops and public transport offers particular locational advantages. The Council will continue to work closely with Associated British Ports, the Welsh Development Agency, Welsh Assembly Government, registered social landlords and private sector developers to ensure that at least 20% of the total number of residential units are for affordable housing in the Barry Waterfront Redevelopment Scheme.

Holton Reach site on the Waterfront, Barry 

POLICY HOUS 13 - EXCEPTION SITES FOR AFFORDABLE HOUSING

IF IT CAN BE DEMONSTRATED THAT IN THE RURAL VALE THERE IS AN IDENTIFIED LOCAL NEED FOR AFFORDABLE HOUSING, THE DEVELOPMENT OF A LIMITED NUMBER OF ADDITIONAL SITES WILL BE PERMITTED IF ALL OF THE FOLLOWING CRITERIA ARE MET:

  1. THE SITE IS WITHIN OR ADJOINING AN EXISTING SETTLEMENT BOUNDARY;
  2. THE SITE IS COMMENSURATE IN SCALE, DESIGN AND LOCATION WITH THE IDENTIFIED NEED;
  3. CLEAR AND ADEQUATE ARRANGEMENTS ARE MADE TO ENSURE THAT THE BENEFITS OF SUCH HOUSING ARE SECURED FOR INITIAL AND SUBSEQUENT OCCUPANTS;
  4. THE SCALE AND FORM OF THE PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT IS IN KEEPING WITH SURROUNDING USES;
  5. THE PROPOSAL HAS NO UNACCEPTABLE EFFECT ON THE AMENITY AND CHARACTER OF EXISTING OR NEIGHBOURING ENVIRONMENTS BY VIRTUE OF NOISE, TRAFFIC
    CONGESTION, EXACERBATION OF PARKING PROBLEMS OR VISUAL INTRUSION;
  6. THE PROPOSAL DOES NOT HAVE AN UNACCEPTABLE IMPACT ON GOOD QUALITY AGRICULTURAL LAND (GRADES 1, 2 OR 3a), ON AREAS OF ATTRACTIVE LANDSCAPE OR HIGH QUALITY TOWNSCAPE OR ON AREAS OF HISTORICAL, ARCHAEOLOGICAL, ECOLOGICAL, GEOLOGICAL OR GEOMORPHOLOGICAL IMPORTANCE;
  7. OPEN SPACE IS PROVIDED IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE COUNCIL'S APPROVED STANDARDS;
  8. THE PROVISION OF CAR PARKING AND AMENITY SPACE IS IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE COUNCIL'S APPROVED GUIDELINES;
  9. ADEQUATE COMMUNITY AND UTILITY SERVICES EXIST, ARE REASONABLY ACCESSIBLE OR CAN BE READILY OR ECONOMICALLY PROVIDED.

FOR THE PURPOSE OF THIS POLICY THE RURAL VALE IS DEFINED AS BEYOND THE SETTLEMENTS OF BARRY, PENARTH, LLANDOUGH (PENARTH), DINAS POWYS AND SULLY. 

4.4.88.

Planning Policy Wales 2002 section 9.2 states that in rural areas, special provision for affordable housing may be considered to help ensure the viability of the local community. The release of any small housing sites to meet local housing needs as an exception to the policies for general housing provision must be fully justified in terms of meeting an identified local need for such housing. Sites that are proposed must also meet all the other criteria against which normal housing developments
would be judged. 

4.4.89.

The terms “affordable housing” or “affordable homes” are used in the Technical Advice Note (Wales) 2 “Planning and Affordable Housing” to encompass both low cost market and subsidised housing (irrespective of tenure, exclusive or shared ownership, or financial arrangements) that will be available to people who cannot afford to occupy houses generally available on the open market.

4.4.90.

The Technical Advice Note (TAN) goes on to say that the Government's wish to encourage diversity of housing tenure, advocated in the 1995 Housing White Paper, applies equally to affordable housing delivered through the planning system.

4.4.91.

In respect of rural exception sites the TAN states that these can provide “a small but important additional source of affordable housing in rural areas to meet the needs of local people”. Such sites will be released as an exception to normal plan policies, should be located within or adjoining existing villages, and should be regarded as additional to the provision of housing for general demand. The TAN goes on to state that it is not envisaged that the scale of provision of affordable housing on land which would not normally receive planning permission for housing will be large or such as to unbalance the pattern of settlements in the community.

4.4.92.

The above policy sets out criteria against which rural exceptions proposals will be judged. The Council is to undertake a rural needs housing survey during 1998/9. Pending its publication applicants will need to establish that there is an identified local need for affordable housing in the area.

POLICY HOUS 14 - GYPSY CARAVANS

PROPOSALS FOR THE USE OF LAND FOR THE SITING OF RESIDENTIAL CARAVANS OCCUPIED BY GYPSIES WILL ONLY BE PERMITTED IF ALL OF THE FOLLOWING CRITERIA ARE MET:

  1. THE PROPOSAL DOES NOT HAVE AN UNACCEPTABLE EFFECT ON THE AMENITY OR CHARACTER OF NEARBY AREAS BY VIRTUE OF NOISE, TRAFFIC CONGESTION, EXACERBATION OF TRAFFIC CONGESTION OR PARKING PROBLEMS;
  2. THE PROPOSAL DOES NOT HAVE AN UNACCEPTABLE EFFECT ON THE INTERESTS OF AGRICULTURE, CONSERVATION AREAS OF ECOLOGICAL, GEOLOGICAL, GEOMORPHOLOGICAL AND WILDLIFE IMPORTANCE OR LANDSCAPE PROTECTION;
  3. THE PROPOSAL HAS A SAFE VEHICULAR ACCESS;
  4. SATISFACTORY LANDSCAPING IS PROVIDED;
  5. ADEQUATE COMMUNITY AND UTILITY SERVICES EXIST AND ARE REASONABLY ACCESSIBLE OR CAN BE READILY AND ECONOMICALLY PROVIDED.
4.4.93.

Gypsies are defined in Section 17 of the 1968 Caravan Sites Act as “persons of nomadic habit of life, whatever their race or origin”. However, this definition was further developed by the Secretary of State in 1977, during a review of gypsy policy, to add the following criteria:

  1. A pattern of residing in or resorting to a particular area
  2. A requirement for a pitch or caravan.

The policy applies to gypsies in this sense. 

4.4.94.

Welsh Office Circular 2/94 Gypsy Sites & Planning advises that proposals for gypsy sites should continue to be determined in relation to land use factors and should be consistent with agricultural, archaeological, countryside and environment objectives.

4.4.95.

The Welsh Assembly Government's bi-annual survey on the number of gypsies present within the Vale of Glamorgan on a particular day in January and July each year and it gives some indication of the demand for gypsy sites within the Vale. Over recent years the survey figures show that there were few gypsies present within the Vale. It is not considered therefore that there is sufficient demand for the allocation of sites within the Vale. Should there be any applications for such sites they will be assessed against the criteria contained within the above policy.

4.4.96.

Circular 78/91 “Travelling Showpeople” states that development plans should consider the needs of travelling showpeople and make a realistic assessment of the amount of accommodation required. It is considered that there is no tradition of a pressure for sites of this nature within the Vale of Glamorgan.

4.5.

IMPLEMENTATION

4.5.1.

Many of the policies contained within this chapter will be implemented through the Council's development control powers. The majority of the sites allocated in Policy HOUS 1 will be developed by the private housing market, although the Council will seek to ensure that affordable housing is provided within the larger sites by the involvement of appropriate housing associations. The Council's Housing Strategy and Operational Plan is also an important vehicle in determining housing policy in the Vale.

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