5. Economic Development & Tourism

5.1.

INTRODUCTION

Barry Waterfront Festival
5.1.1.

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

The Council's Community Strategy aims to strengthen the local economy through a range of measures including; undertaking urban regeneration initiatives, developing tourism, enhancing town centres, promoting the Vale of Glamorgan as a location for investment, providing information and advice on sites and premises and environmental and sustainability issues, and where appropriate offering financial assistance to training and businesses.

5.1.2.

The Plan aims to provide the land-use policy base to support the aims of this Strategy and also incorporates the justification for Policies 4, 5 and 6 in Part One of the Unitary Development Plan. It provides detailed policies for the development and use of land for employment purposes, and to facilitate the growth of the local economy. 

5.1.3.

Large Towns

Barry with a resident population of 46,980, is a key employment area for the Vale. Historically built on port-related activities it later developed a strong manufacturing base, which was eroded considerably during the 1970's and early in the 1980's. By the end of the last decade however, new investment in manufacturing industries had arrived. Companies such as Dow Corning, Dow Chemicals, Zeon Chemicals and Cabot Carbon have helped to strengthen Barry's important chemical industry.

5.1.4.

Barry Docks is still a significant asset to the town currently handling approximately 400,000 tonnes of cargo a year with projected growth of a further 300,000 tonnes a year by the year 2005. 

5.1.5.

Barry shares many of the problems of dereliction, lack of investment and unemployment of the South Wales Valleys. In response, partnerships have been formed between the Council, the Welsh Development Agency (WDA) and Associated British Ports (ABP) to implement a concerted plan of action for the regeneration of brownfield sites. As Barry serves a much wider area in terms of its economy and employment potential, this represents a substantial benefit for the Vale of Glamorgan as a whole. Central to Barry's regeneration is the Joint Initiative between the WDA and Associated British Ports to redevelop approximately 77 hectares of land around the No.1 Dock area known as "The Waterfront Barry". Proposals include up to 1,000 houses business development, retailing and leisure facilities. 

5.1.6.

The town serves as the administrative centre for the Vale of Glamorgan Council having its main offices in the town, in the Civic Centre and in the Dock Office. Barry has the largest traditional shopping centre in the Vale of Glamorgan but has suffered from a lack of private investment, the effects of economic recession and out-of-town competition in recent years. Tourism is also a key industry in Barry. 

5.1.7.

Penarth is the second largest town in the Vale with a population of 20,930. Its Victorian Esplanade and Pier is popular with tourists and complements the facilities at Barry. Penarth has a successful town centre and small industrial areas but along with Dinas Powys, it is a dormitory settlement with many residents working in Barry and Cardiff. The nearby Llandough Hospital is a major employer. A small part of Penarth falls within the remit of the Cardiff Bay Development Corporation. A mixed
development of housing, retail, commercial / business and convenience facilities is already well established.

Penarth Pier 

5.1.8.

Rural Vale

The remaining parts of the area are predominantly rural in nature, with attractive countryside and coastal locations contributing to the Vale's important assets. West of Barry is Rhoose, home of Cardiff International Airport, which has witnessed substantial investment from its owners. British Airways Maintenance Cardiff (BAMC) has invested in a major maintenance plant and a new business park is being developed alongside the airport. Other major employers in the Rural Vale include Robert Bosch at Miskin manufacturing automotive alternators. 

5.1.9.

Lafarge Cement Works at Aberthaw The Aberthaw power station and the Lafarge cement works are important to the local economy, as is the RAF and Army base at St. Athan. Llantwit Major and Cowbridge provide shopping facilities for those in the western Vale and attract significant numbers of tourists. At Llandow there are two major employment sites with land available for small and medium sized business at Llandow Trading Estate and the Vale Business Park. 

5.1.10.

The rural areas of the Vale are important in providing a strong agricultural base together with a quality environment, which is a key part of the area's attraction. The Plan recognises the structural
changes which are taking place in the agricultural industry and seeks to accommodate these so that both socially and economically the Rural Vale remains viable. 

5.1.11.

Tourism

Tourism is one of the United Kingdom's most important growth industries and, in terms of world trade, a fast growing market. Currently it generates 5-6% of the country's G.D.P., accounts for 7% employment and is the fourth largest source of export revenue (source: “A new Approach to Tourism”, ADC Paper 1996). 

5.1.12.

Tourism is defined by the Tourism Society as:

“...the temporary movement of people to destinations outside the places where they normally live and work and their activities during their stay at these destinations; it includes movement for all purposes as well as day visits or excursions.”

Tourists include those persons on holiday, visiting friends or relatives (VFR) or on business, and can include people visiting an area for other reasons such as studying. They tend to be categorised into “Domestic Tourists” (i.e. tourists who travel within the borders of the United Kingdom) and “Overseas” or “International Tourists” (i.e. tourists who travel from abroad to the United Kingdom). 

5.1.13.

A well-managed tourism industry can bring many benefits to an area. It can strengthen the local economy, through visitors generating new income, create new jobs, enable a local economy to diversify, and also attract inward investment. The environment can also benefit with tourism developments leading to the regeneration of derelict urban areas, restoring redundant historic buildings and sites, and assisting the upgrading of country and coastal walks. It can also provide social and cultural benefits, improving the image of an area and raising local civic pride. The local community can also benefit from improved infrastructure and amenities such as the upgrading of transport infrastructure and improved sports and leisure facilities. 

5.1.14.

In the Vale of Glamorgan tourism plays an important role within the local economy. The industry  accounts for 3,418 jobs, some 9.23% of the total working population. This compares to 8.34% of the working population in Wales (Census of Employment, 1993). In 1994 a Tourism and Economic Activity Model (STEAM) was used to assess the importance of tourism to the economy of the former Vale of Glamorgan Borough. The Model revealed that tourism expenditure in the Vale in 1994 amounted to some £110.1 million. 

5.1.15.

As a tourist destination the Vale of Glamorgan offers a diversity of visitor experiences. These include the main visitor destination of Barry Island. The Island has been established as a traditional seaside resort since the Victorian era, and is dominated by the funfair, Whitmore Bay bathing beach, a new Steam Railway Centre and numerous smaller attractions, amusement arcades and cafes. Further east is the Victorian seaside town of Penarth with its elegant Pier, Esplanade, extensive landscaped gardens, marina and on the edge of town, Cosmeston Lakes Country Park and Medieval Village. The Rural Vale's appeal to visitors is its diverse countryside, woodland and farmland areas, dotted with numerous small villages. To the south is the dramatic coastline with extensive views of the Bristol Channel, punctuated by isolated, tranquil beaches, 11 miles of which is Heritage Coastline. Within the rural Vale sit the two historic towns of Cowbridge and Llantwit Major,
where visitor appeal includes their Conservation Areas and numerous historic buildings, with Cowbridge also providing an attractive shopping destination with its boutiques, arts and craft shops and restaurants.

Swans at Cosmeston Lakes Llantwit Major

5.1.16.

The Council recognises that the tourist industry must be well managed, particularly in terms ofprotecting the environment; itself a tourist asset, which can easily be damaged by poorly controlled tourism and recreational activities. At the same time the interests of the local community must be balanced with the economic benefits of a growing tourism industry. The “Environment” Chapter of the Plan recognises the potential problems and contains policies to protect and enhance the Vale's natural environment. 

5.2.

NATIONAL PLANNING GUIDANCE

5.2.1.

National planning guidance in respect of economic development is embodied in:

  • Planning Policy Wales 2002
  • Welsh Rural White Paper - A Working Countryside for Wales (1996)
5.2.2.

Planning Policy Wales 2002, Chapter 7, states that local planning authorities preparing development plans should have regard to the allocation of land for employment and local economic development. 

5.2.3.

In particular it states the Plan should aim to provide for development within or adjacent to established local centres, to make available spent land which is readily capable of development (and well served by infrastructure), and to ensure that there is a variety of sites available to meet differing needs. It also states that development plans should identify new industrial and commercial development locations which meet or have the potential to meet the Government's planning policies for transport, and to promote underused and vacant land and premises, especially those adjacent to existing or disused, but safeguarded, railways and docks. Emphasis is placed on encouraging economic development which is compatible with the Government's environmental and transport objectives; and achieves a balance between employment and population. 

5.2.4.

With regard to rural areas the guidance suggests that a variety of employment opportunities be promoted and that the development plan should benefit the rural economy and maintain or enhance the environment. 

5.2.5.

Welsh Rural White Paper - “A Working Countryside for Wales” (1996) outlines the Government's proposals for the development of the rural economy and states that several factors need to be considered in the siting and location of development in the countryside:

“Large developments should be located in those settlements where they minimise the demand for new infrastructure and travel.”
(P71, Sustainable Development), and

“The Government's aim is to promote sustainable development and to respect the diversity of rural Wales.”
(P87, Planning) 

5.2.6.

National planning guidance for tourism is included in:

  • Planning Policy Wales 2002
  • Planning Policy Wales, Technical Advice Note (Wales) 13 - Tourism (1997) (NB: This is referred to in this document as TAN)
5.2.7.

Planning Policy Wales 2002 states that the Welsh Assembly Government's objectives for tourism are:

  • to encourage sustainable tourism in Wales, maximising its economic and employment benefits, promoting tourism in all seasons, and encouraging its development in non-traditional destinations, while safeguarding the environment, and the interests of local communities; and
  • to manage change in the tourism sector in ways which respect the integrity of the natural, built and cultural environment to provide for economic growth employment and environmental conservation.
5.2.8.

The TAN provides more detailed guidance and has been considered in the formulation of the policies in this section. The TAN deals specifically with issues relating to hotels, caravan parks and seasonal and holiday occupancy conditions. 

5.2.9.

Wales Tourist Board - “Tourism 2000 Strategy”

The Wales Tourist Board sets out the national framework for the development and promotion of tourism within Wales. In 1994 the Board published the “Tourism 2000” Strategy which aims to secure high quality sustainable tourism development which protects the natural and built environment. The aims of the strategy are achieved through the WTB working in partnership with statutory agencies, local authorities, the private sector and other bodies. The vision of the Board for the year 2000 is set out in the document in terms of targets and priorities for the tourism industry.

5.3.

OBJECTIVES

5.3.1.

The Council is committed to supporting the local economy and local economic development and tourism through a range of measures including the provision of a choice and range of sites. The policies will assist the Council to:

  • strengthen the local economy;
  • widen job opportunities for local residents by improving access to employment, and training;
  • improve the economic infrastructure of the Vale;
  • set out strategic policies for development, conservation and transportation that will enable the local economy to grow in a sustainable framework;
  • improve the urban fabric and to enhance the physical and natural environment of the Vale;
  • create the conditions for a thriving tourism industry whilst safeguarding and enhancing the environment and interests of the local community;
  • promote tourism to a level compatible with the Vale's capacity to cater for such activity, maximised through good visitor management and only permitting sensitive developments;
  • encourage new investment in tourism in both facilities and accommodation and to encourage improvements in the standard of provision;
  • ensure that new investment in tourism does not conflict with the environmental polices of the Plan.
5.4.

POLICIES & PROPOSALS

5.4.1.

The Council's policies for economic development strive to meet the aims and objectives outlined in Planning Policy Wales (2002) and the Rural White Paper, with regeneration of brownfield sites for employment use, restricting development to sites already in existence and implementing design controls to complement the aesthetic character of the Vale of Glamorgan. 

5.4.2.

Policy EMP 1 allocates land for employment on both new and established sites. Where other established employment sites have been omitted it is because no land is available at the time of publication.

POLICY EMP 1 - LAND FOR EMPLOYMENT USES

THE FOLLOWING LAND IS ALLOCATED FOR EMPLOYMENT USES:
Site No.
Site Name
Use Classes
Land (Ha) Available
     TOTAL 199.4
(1)
Atlantic Trading Estate
BR, B2 & B8
12.0 (*1)
(2)
Barry Business Park B1 & B8
0.8
(3)
Barry Docks and Chemical Complex B1, B2 & B8
16.6
(4)
Cardiff International Airport Business Park
B1, B2 & B8 58.9
(5)
Hayes Lane
B1 & B8
1.4
(6)
Hayes Road, barry
B1 5.3
(7)
Hayes Wood
B1 & B8
4.2
(8)
Llandough Trading Estate
B1, B2 & B8 0.9
(9)
Llandow Trading Estate
B1, B2 & B8 7.3
(10)
Marley Tile Co. Site, St. Mary Hill
B1, B2 & B8 1.6
(11)
Pencoedtre Business Park
B1 & B8
3.2
(12)
Rhoose Quarry B1, B2 & B8 2.9
(13)
Sully Moors Road, Barry
B1, B2 (part) & B8 5.0
(14)
The Waterfront, Barry
B1 & B8
3.4 (*2)
(15)
Ty-Verlon Industrial Estate
B1, B2 & B8 0.5
(16)
Vale Business Park B1, B2 & B8 14.8
(17)
Land to the North of Rhoose
B1 & B8
6.3
(18)
Pencoedtre B1 & B8
(*3)
(19) Land to the SE of M4 Junction (Bosch, Miskin)
B1, B2 & B8 54.3

(*1) This is an estimate of land available after redevelopment of Atlantic Trading Estate

(*2) Proposals for this redevelopment indicate an illustrative figure for “commercial” land of 3.4 hectares. However, this is a mixed-use scheme, and substantial additional employment will be created in areas allocated for retail and leisure developments.

(*3) Dependent upon outcome of development brief for the mixed residential, employment and woodland use of the site.

5.4.3.

The employment land allocation is based on sites already with planning permission together with an assessment of employment opportunities available both in the Vale of Glamorgan and in neighbouring areas, an analysis of the workforce in the Vale of Glamorgan and its patterns of movement, and forecasts of the economic prospects for the area. Sufficient land has been earmarked to allow existing companies to grow and to allow the Council to compete for inward investment. The amount of land identified also reflects a desire to provide local employment opportunities for a higher proportion of Vale residents and thus reduce outward commuting. It provides the scope, too, for reducing the unacceptably high levels of unemployment that prevail in parts of the Vale of Glamorgan. 

5.4.4.

Suitable uses for available employment land within specific sites are shown in the Policy:

  • B1 refers to Light Industry / Offices (Business Use);
  • B2 is General Industry;
  • B8 is Warehousing and Distribution.
It is important that this policy is read in conjunction with other policies in this Plan, and in particular Policy EMP 2.
5.4.5.

The Council recognises the important role of small businesses in the local economy and is supportive of proposals for smaller industrial units (50 - 150 sq.m), on identified sites. Whilst sites are identified for particular uses, it should be noted that this reflects suitability in planning or land use terms, it does not imply availability of all services. Similarly, some of the sites will require raised ground levels and may be restricted in terms of surface water drainage and any business or industrial development must include measures to ensure that any rivers, other inland waters and underground water resources will be safeguarded. This policy should be read in conjunction with Policy ENV 7. 

5.4.6.

Site 1: Atlantic Trading Estate

The site is a former Ministry of Defence depot, located to the south of the No.2 Dock in Barry. The southern part of the Estate has been purchased by the Vale of Glamorgan and is subject to a major programme of redevelopment to improve access, enhance the environment and upgrade services on the site. The site is an under used resource and its redevelopment will release additional land for
employment use. The northern part of the Estate has recently been acquired by ABP. The Proposals Map identifies the boundary of Atlantic Trading Estate within which land is available. It is recommended that further development of this site is subject to further consultation with the Environment Agency and that flood defence levels are raised to a minimum of 8.6 AOD.

5.4.7.

Site 2: Barry Business Park

The 0.8 hectare Business Park site is located at the junction of Cardiff Road and Sully Moors Road, Barry. Planning permission has been granted for B1 use, but the site has not yet been developed. Potential uses included B1 and B8 development. As the site is adjacent to the River Cadoxton, it is recommended that ground levels are raised in consultation with the Environment Agency to avoid  any potential flooding risk. Development must not exacerbate flooding in the vicinity. Compensatory works may be required to be undertaken which will be at the expense of the developer. 

5.4.8.

Site 3: Barry Docks and Chemical Complex

Barry Docks is the largest area of industrial land in the Vale and is owned by Associated British Ports. A large proportion of the land is leased for business use, including operational port facilities. The 13.1 hectares of land available for employment use is adjacent to the No. 2 Dock Bypass, adjacent to The Waterfront, Barry comprehensive redevelopment area and Barry Chemical Complex. It is recommended that further development of this site is subject to consultation with the Environment Agency given that part of the site lies within 250 metres of a former landfill site and that flood defence levels are raised to a minimum of 8.6 AOD. The site is presently not sewered and should there be a requirement in the future to connect mains sewerage an assessment of the public sewerage system and Bendricks Sewage Pumping Station will be necessary to ascertain whether the sewerage system can accept the additional foul drainage flow.

5.4.9.

Dow Corning The remainder of the land forms part of the Chemical Complex, a grouping of various chemical industries on a relatively large flat site to the east of the No. 2 Dock in Barry. The Chemical Complex is home to a number of firms including: Dow Corning, Dow Chemicals, Zeon Chemicals and Cabot Carbon. The south east of the site is occupied by the Vale Enterprise Centre, a collection of workshops housing a number of small businesses. Activities are expanding with Dow Corning implementing the Genesis project, and Van Ommeren Terminals developing a new storage facility at the Windmill site adjacent to Hayes Road. While the site has been identified for B1, B2 uses, proposals for the suitable expansion of existing industrial uses on the site will be considered on merit by the Council, subject to environmental safeguards. Where appropriate, development proposals will be subject to an environmental assessment in accordance with procedures identified in the Welsh Office Circular 11/99, 'Environmental Impact Assessment'. Schedules 1 and 2 of the note identify projects which may require an assessment. The site lies within 250 metres of a former landfill site. It is recommended that further development of this siteis subject to consultation with the Environment Agency and that flood defence levels are raised to a minimum of 8.6 AOD. The site is presently not sewered and should there be a requirement in the future to connect mains sewerage, an assessment of the public sewerage system and Bendricks Sewage Pumping Station will be necessary to ascertain whether the sewerage system can accept the additional foul drainage flow. 

5.4.10.

Site 4: Cardiff International Airport Business Park

British Airways Maintenance Base Cardiff International Airport Business Park is a 58.9 hectare greenfield site immediately adjacent the eastern boundary of Cardiff International Airport, on land primarily owned by the Council. Development has already taken place to the north of the Business Park in the form of the British Airways Maintenance Cardiff (BAMC) facility which services Boeing 747 aircraft.

5.4.11.

Site 5: Hayes Lane

This privately owned plot of land of some 1.4 hectares overlooks Hayes Lane and is adjacent to Atlantic Trading Estate. The land is occupied by an existing industrial operation but could form part of a more comprehensive redevelopment of the Atlantic Trading Estate. Access to the site will be improved by the construction of a link road between Hayes Wood (Site 7) and Atlantic Trading Estate (Site 1). It is recommended that further development of this site is subject to consultation with
the Environment Agency as the site lies within 250 metres of a former landfill site and that flood defence levels need to be raised to a minimum of 8.6 AOD.

5.4.12.

Site 6: Hayes Road, Barry

This site is located to the south of Hayes Road and north of the coastal SSSI. Formerly part of a Ministry of Defence storage depot it has since been cleared. Of a total area of 7.3 hectares, 2 hectares is required to provide a buffer zone at the coastal fringe, reducing developable land to 5.3 hectares. Development is restricted to B1 uses, recognising the particular value of this location in fulfilling a need for high quality B1 sites.

5.4.13.

Site 7: Hayes Wood

A former sports ground now owned by the WDA, Hayes Wood has permission for B1 and B8 uses and lies adjacent to a residential area on Hayes Road. The site provides direct access to the adjoining Atlantic Trading Estate (Site 1) following the construction of a new access road. The site is largely serviced and the WDA will make plots available to encourage start-up businesses. B2 uses are not acceptable, and a buffer will be required between industrial development and the adjoining houses. It is recommended that further development of this site is subject to consultation with the Environment Agency and that flood defence levels are raised to a minimum of 8.6 AOD.

5.4.14.

Site 8: Llandough Trading Estate

Entrance to Llandough Trading Estate The site is located north of the town of Penarth, on the eastern boundary of the Vale, and is a largely developed established estate with a range of business and warehousing uses, covering two areas of land running either side of Penarth Road. The site available which was formerly in retail use comprises 0.9 hectares of land available adjacent to the roundabout access to the West Point Industrial Estate along Penarth Road. It is recommended that further development of this site is subject to consultation with the Environment Agency and that flood defence levels are raised to a minimum of 8.6 AOD.

5.4.15.

Site 9: Llandow Trading Estate

Llandow Trading Estate is at the southern end of a former airfield and includes a significant amount of low-grade general industry. Although shown primarily as non-agricultural land on the Agricultural Land Classification maps, parts of the former airfield are successfully used for farming purpose, notably grazing and cereal production. 7.3 hectares of land are available to the north west of the site. Acceptable uses include B1, B2 and B8, although there may be constraints on certain developments on environmental grounds. Restrictions will be imposed following consultation with the Environment Agency in respect of pollution control and storage of materials as a large part of the site is known to drain to a carboniferous limestone aquifer from which ground-water is abstracted. The site lies within 250 metres of a former landfill site.

5.4.16.

Site 10: Marley Tile Co. Site, St Mary Hill

1.6 hectares of land is located within the site of a former tile manufacturer within the countryside, north west of Cowbridge. A distribution warehouse remains within the site with an area to the north providing a storage yard, both are used by an established roofing-tile company. Environmental safeguards are paramount and expansion beyond the boundary of the site will not be permitted.

5.4.17.

Site 11: Pencoedtre Business Park

The site has 3.2 hectares available for business / warehousing development (B1, B8) and is to the south of the Pencoedtre site (Site 18). The site adjoins an area of ancient woodland (largely owned by the Forestry Commission). Both sites require archaeological investigation prior to development. Surface run-off must not exceed greenfield site flows. See also Policy HOUS1(3).

5.4.18.

Site 12: Rhoose Quarry

The designation of 2.9 hectares of land at Rhoose for employment purposes was granted outline planning consent in March 1996. The land for employment uses is adjacent to the main railway line in the north east corner of the site. Surface water run-off must not exceed greenfield site flows. See also Policy HOUS1(13).

5.4.19.

Site 13: Sully Moors Road, Barry

The site is a low-lying greenfield site on the eastern edge of Barry, opposite the Chemical Complex. A number of businesses operate from Sully Moors Road, but an area of land (5.0 hectares currently used for grazing) is available for industrial development. While B1 and B8 uses would be suitable for the whole site, B2 will be restricted to the northern part of the site, in view of the relative proximity of housing. The site lies within 250 metres of a former landfill site. The site is also adjacent to the Sully Brook and is at risk of flooding. Developers will be required to establish the theoretical 1 in 100 year flood level and set ground levels 500 millimetres above that level. Development must not exacerbate flooding in the vicinity which may require compensatory works to be undertaken at the developers expense. It is recommended that Welsh Water Dwr Cymru be consulted to ascertain the predicted demand of any new development on the existing sewerage network. Protection measures or diversion will be required to protect the water main crossing the site.

5.4.20.

Site 14: The Waterfront, Barry

The Waterfront is located around the No. 1 Dock and covers an area of some 77 hectares, including 11 hectares for employment. The implementation of this scheme, is the Council's priority for economic regeneration. It is recommended that further development of this site is subject to further consultation with the Environment Agency and that flood defence levels are raised to a minimum of 8.6 AOD. See also Policy HOUS 1 (1).

Waterfront Retail Park, Barry 

5.4.21.

Site 15: Ty-Verlon Industrial Estate

This site covers the established Ty-Verlon Industrial Estate, Priority Enterprise Park and the former Plaracon Tyres site, which has been the focus of recent development. One plot is available for development within Priority Enterprise Park. Potential uses are B1, B2 and B8 classes. The site lies within 250 metres of a former landfill site.

5.4.22.

Site 16: Vale Business Park

Entrance to the Vale Business Park, Llandow This employment site was formerly known as Llandow Industrial Estate and is located on the site of the former Llandow airfield, between Llantwit Major and Cowbridge. The site is accessed from the B4270 and supports a wide range of industrial and business activities. The Vale Business Park has been the focus of a considerable amount of recent investment. On the periphery of the former airfield large hangars are used chiefly for storage purposes, although one is used for furniture retailing. For the purpose of the policies relating to business and industrial development in this area, the hangars are considered as part of the existing estate.

5.4.23.

A total of 14.8 hectares, split into five plots is available for development. Full planning permission for development of the largest plot to the south of the site will not be permitted until a new roundabout at the entrance to the Vale Business Park, on the B4270 and the link road between the A48 and B4270 has been constructed. 

5.4.24.

A large part of these sites is known to affect the carboniferous limestone aquifer from which ground-water is abstracted. Environmental safeguards will be required by the Environment Agency in respect of pollution control and storage of materials. 

5.4.25.

Site 17: Land to the North of Rhoose, off Rhoose Road

A 6.3 hectare site immediately adjacent to the built up area of Rhoose. The location of the site adjoining residential properties will require careful attention to design, landscaping and other amenity issues. Protective measures or, the diversion of the water main at the developers expense is required prior to commencement of works. The site is considered particularly suitable for employment for airport related uses.

5.4.26.

Site 18: Pencoedtre

The Pencoedtre site is located to the north east of Barry at the junction of the Barry Docks Link Road and Port Road, with the amount of land available being dependent upon a comprehensive development brief being prepared. The site will be suited to B1 and B8 uses.

5.4.27.

The sensitive location of the site requires care to be taken in designing the development. The site accommodates a considerable amount of good quality ancient woodland which needs to be retained as part of any development scheme. The Environment Agency and the Countryside Council for Wales have indicated that the woodland on the site is of high wildlife and nature conservation value. A survey of the woodland and appropriate management plan will be required prior to the granting of planning permission. In addition Glamorgan-Gwent Archaeological Trust have indicated that the site is potentially of importance and therefore an archaeological investigation of the site will be required prior to the commencement of development. Considerable investment is required in transportation and infrastructure and a comprehensive approach to the overall development is essential. Measures would need to be undertaken by a developer to locate and protect a 36 inch diameter high pressure trunk water main which crosses the site. The main cannot supply the site and therefore extensive off-site main laying will be required leading to high developer's costs. Greenfield drainage restrictions apply to this site and further consultation with the Environment Agency and the local authority is recommended. 

5.4.28.

Site 19: Land to the South East of Junction 34 (BOSCH, MISKIN)

Bosch Factory at Miskin This site is located south east of junction 34 of the M4 at Miskin and is part developed by the Robert Bosch alternator plant. The development occupies 11.7 hectares of a total site area of 66 hectares allowed under a planning permission granted for use classes B1, B2 and B8. The site is considered to have high archaeological potential and the Council will seek to protect areas of nature conservation interest and features of landscape value within any future development proposals for the site. Greenfield drainage restrictions may apply to this site and consultation with the Environment Agency and the local authority is recommended. It is also recommended that any developer consults Welsh Water Dwr Cymru to ascertain the predicted demand of any new development on the existing sewerage network. The site is within 250 metres of a former landfill site.

POLICY EMP 2 - PROPOSALS FOR NEW BUSINESS AND INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT

PROPOSALS FOR NEW BUSINESS AND INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT INCLUDING AGRICULTURAL SERVICE INDUSTRIES AND THE EXTENSION, CONVERSION AND REPLACEMENT OF EXISTING PREMISES FOR SUCH PURPOSES, WILL BE PERMITTED IF ALL OF THE FOLLOWING CRITERIA ARE MET:

  1. THE PROPOSAL DOES NOT LIE WITHIN THE COUNTRYSIDE EXCEPT FOR THOSE PROPOSALS ACCEPTABLE UNDER THE TERMS OF ENV 8 (RURAL BUILDINGS) OR COMM 2 (REDUNDANT HOSPITALS);
  2. THE PROPOSAL MINIMISES THE LOSS OF GOOD QUALITY AGRICULTURAL LAND (GRADES 1, 2 AND 3A) AND DOES NOT HAVE AN UNACCEPTABLE IMPACT ON AREAS OF ATTRACTIVE LANDSCAPE AND HIGH QUALITY TOWNSCAPE OR ON AREAS OF HISTORICAL, ARCHAEOLOGICAL OR ECOLOGICAL IMPORTANCE;
  3. THE SIZE AND RELATIONSHIP OF ANY NEW BUILDING AND / OR ALTERATION OR EXTENSION IS NOT DISPROPORTIONATE TO ITS SIZE AND SETTING;
  4. ACCESS AND PARKING ARRANGEMENTS ARE IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE COUNCIL'S APPROVED STANDARDS;
  5. ADEQUATE LANDSCAPING IS PROVIDED;
  6. THE PROPOSAL DOES NOT HAVE AN UNACCEPTABLE EFFECT ON RESIDENTIAL AMENITY BY VIRTUE OF TRAFFIC CONGESTION, NOISE, SMELL, SAFETY, HEALTH IMPACTS AND EMISSIONS;
  7. ADEQUATE UTILITY AND INFRASTRUCTURE SERVICES EXIST OR ARE REASONABLY ACCESSIBLE OR CAPABLE OF BEING READILY AND ECONOMICALLY PROVIDED;
  8. DOES NOT PRESENT ADDITIONAL RISK TO THE HEALTH OR SAFETY OF USERS OF THE SITE AND DOES NOT UNACCEPTABLY POLLUTE AIR, WATER, OR LAND; AND
  9. DOES NOT UNACCEPTABLY AFFECT THE USE OF THE ADJOINING LAND BY VIRTUE OF THE RISK AND IMPACT OF POTENTIAL POLLUTION.
5.4.29.

Whilst it is recognised that there is a need to encourage investment in industrial and commercial development in appropriate locations, it is important to ensure that industrial and commercial development is of a high standard of design and that proposals pay proper regard to the character and appearance of their surroundings. In primarily residential areas commercial and industrial activities of an appropriate scale, are acceptable provided there is not likely to be any adverse effects on residential amenity by virtue of traffic generation, noise, smell, safety, health impacts and emissions. All new industrial or other business development will be located on land identified in Policy EMP 1 or on sites currently used, or last used, for such purposes, other than where in breach of planning control. An exception to this policy can be made in respect of the use of rural buildings for appropriate small-scale industries, in accordance with Policy ENV 8. 

5.4.30.

An aim of this policy in accordance with Policy ENV1 is to prevent sporadic development in the countryside whilst at the same time allowing appropriate tourist related, service or "craft" industries and workshops to be established in the rural area. Strict control over the conversion of rural buildings will be imposed, particularly if the structure is of historic or architectural importance in accordance with Policy ENV 8 of the Plan. 

5.4.31.

Parking facilities should be provided in accordance with the Council's approved parking guidelines, see Policy TRAN 10.

POLICY EMP 3 - GENERAL INDUSTRY

DEVELOPMENT WILL BE PERMITTED FOR B2 USE* (GENERAL INDUSTRY) WHERE:

  1. THE PROPOSAL IS COMPATIBLE WITH EXISTING BUSINESS / INDUSTRIAL / WAREHOUSING USES;
  2. IT WILL NOT CAUSE DETRIMENT TO THE AMENITIES OF NEARBY RESIDENTIAL AREAS;
  3. THE NATURE AND SCALE OF THE PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT DOES NOT UNACCEPTABLY AFFECT SURROUNDING USES;
  4. IT DOES NOT PRESENT ADDITIONAL RISK TO THE HEALTH OR SAFETY OF USERS OF THE SITE AND DOES NOT UNACCEPTABLY POLLUTE AIR, WATER OR LAND; AND
  5. IT DOES NOT UNACCEPTABLY AFFECT THE USE OF THE ADJOINING LAND BY VIRTUE OF THE RISK AND IMPACT OF POTENTIAL POLLUTION.
*B2 use - General Industry as defined by Town and Country Planning (Use Classes) Order 1987 (as amended)
5.4.32.

Some sites identified in Policy EMP 1 are suitable, in general terms, for B2 uses. Care must be taken, nevertheless, to ensure that neighbouring uses are not adversely affected.

POLICY EMP 4 - PROTECTION OF LAND FOR EMPLOYMENT USES

ON EXISTING EMPLOYMENT SITES AND SITES IDENTIFIED IN POLICY EMP 1 DEVELOPMENT OF USES THAT ARE NOT CONTAINED IN CLASSES B1, B2 AND B8* OF THE TOWN AND COUNTRY PLANNING (USE CLASSES) ORDER 1987 (AS AMENDED) WILL NOT BE PERMITTED.

* B1 Business, B2 General Industry and B8 Storage or Distribution use as defined by Town and Country Planning (Use Classes) Order 1987 (as amended)

5.4.33.

This policy is aimed at preventing the establishment of other uses, particularly retailing on land available for employment uses. Proposals for non business use on sites as identified in Policy EMP 1 will not be permitted. In view of the vulnerability of employment sites to change to other uses applicants will be requested to enter into appropriate legal agreements to safeguard such sites from uses other than those originally specified. Also see Policy WAST 1.

POLICY EMP 5 - DEVELOPMENTS INVOLVING HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES

DEVELOPMENTS INVOLVING HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES WILL BE PERMITTED IF THE PROPOSAL:

  1. DOES NOT PRESENT ADDITIONAL RISK TO THE HEALTH OR SAFETY OF USERS OF THE SITE AND DOES NOT UNACCEPTABLY POLLUTE AIR, WATER OR LAND;
  2. DOES NOT ADVERSELY AFFECT THE USE OF ADJOINING LAND BY VIRTUE OF THE RISK AND IMPACT OF POTENTIAL POLLUTION;
  3. DOES NOT UNACCEPTABLY AFFECT THE QUALITY OR QUANTITY OF WATER RESOURCES (BOTH SURFACE AND GROUNDWATER);
  4. DOES NOT HAVE AN UNACCEPTABLE EFFECT UPON THE AMENITY AND CHARACTER OF THE NEIGHBOURING LAND OR THE ENVIRONMENT BY VIRTUE OF NOISE, TRAFFIC CONGESTION, EXACERBATION OF PARKING PROBLEMS OR VISUAL INTRUSION;
  5. DOES NOT UNACCEPTABLY CONFLICT WITH THE INTERESTS OF AGRICULTURE, NATURE CONSERVATION, AREAS OF ECOLOGICAL, WILDLIFE OR ARCHAEOLOGICAL IMPORTANCE OR FEATURES OF GEOLOGICAL OR GEOMORPHOLOGICAL IMPORTANCE OR LANDSCAPE PROTECTION POLICIES; AND
  6. PROVIDES ARRANGEMENTS FOR THE AFTER TREATMENT AND FUTURE USE OF THE SITE WHICH ARE TO THE SATISFACTION OF THE LOCAL PLANNING AUTHORITY.
5.4.34.

There are a number of hazardous installations and pipelines located within the Vale of Glamorgan. These sites and pipelines are designated as notifiable installations by the Health and Safety Executive, by virtue of the quantities of hazardous substance stored, used by or, in the case of pipelines, transported. Whilst risks attached to such sites and lines are usually very small, it is important that these uses are separated from other land uses which might be incompatible from a safety viewpoint. The Environment Agency's groundwater protection policy is applicable in respect of such uses. Under the Planning (Hazardous Substances) Regulations 1992, control can be exerted over some uses, even in instances where planning permission is not required. Through its development control function the Council will maintain a close working relationship with the Environment Agency and others, in order to ensure that new developments do not have an unacceptable affect on the environment. Where appropriate development proposals will be subject to an environmental assessment in accordance with procedures identified in the Welsh Office Circular 11/99, 'Environmental Impact Assessment'. This Policy should be read in conjunction with ENV 29 (Protection of Environmental Quality).

POLICY EMP 6 - DEVELOPMENT ADJACENT TO HAZARDOUS INDUSTRIAL USES

DEVELOPMENT WILL NOT BE PERMITTED ADJACENT TO INDUSTRIAL OR OTHER ESTABLISHMENTS WHICH ARE LIKELY TO CAUSE UNACCEPTABLE POLLUTION OR HAZARDS TO USERS OF THE PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT. 

5.4.35.

Whilst notifiable installations are subject to stringent controls by legislation, it is considered prudent to control the kinds of development permitted in the vicinity of these installations. For this reason, the Council has been advised by the Health and Safety Executive and the Environment Agency of consultation zones for each of these installations. In determining whether or not to grant consent for a proposed development within these zones the Council will take account of the advice it receives from the Health and Safety Executive and the Environment Agency about the risks to the proposed development from the notifiable installation. Other installations and pipelines require similar consideration where pollution or hazards may arise. 

5.4.36.

This policy will ensure that not only are the risks to users minimised, but that the continued operation of notifiable installations is not unduly jeopardised.

POLICY EMP 7 - FARM DIVERSIFICATION

PROPOSALS FOR THE DIVERSIFICATION OF EXISTING FARMSTEADS WILL BE PERMITTED IF:

  1. THE DIVERSIFICATION PROPOSALS ARE FOR SMALL SCALE EMPLOYMENT, COMMERCIAL, RECREATIONAL OR TOURISM USES;
  2. PROPOSALS FOR NEW STRUCTURES ARE SPECIFICALLY DESIGNED FOR AND NECESSARY FOR THE PURPOSE OF DIVERSIFICATION;
  3. PROPOSALS ARE COMPATIBLE WITH THE SURROUNDING LANDSCAPE, ADJACENT LAND USES, AND ANY EXISTING RELATED STRUCTURES IN TERMS OF THE SCALE, SITING, DESIGN AND EXTERNAL APPEARANCE OF ANY NEW BUILDING OR EXTENSION TO EXISTING BUILDINGS;
  4. PROPOSALS DO NOT UNACCEPTABLY AFFECT THE INTERESTS OF AGRICULTURE, CONSERVATION, AREAS OF ECOLOGICAL, WILDLIFE, LANDSCAPE, HISTORIC OR ARCHAEOLOGICAL IMPORTANCE;
  5. THE PROVISION OF CAR PARKING, SERVICING AND AMENITY SPACE ARE IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE COUNCIL'S APPROVED GUIDELINES;
  6. VEHICULAR ACCESS IS AVAILABLE OR CAN BE PROVIDED FROM THE PUBLIC HIGHWAY WITHOUT ANY UNACCEPTABLE EFFECT UPON THE APPEARANCE OF THE COUNTRYSIDE; AND
  7. PROPOSALS DO NOT HAVE AN UNACCEPTABLE IMPACT UPON THE AMENITY AND CHARACTER OF THE LOCAL ENVIRONMENT BY VIRTUE OF NOISE, SMELL, TRAFFIC CONGESTION OR VISUAL INTRUSION.
5.4.37.

The Plan recognises the important role played by small-scale enterprises in promoting healthy economic activity in rural areas and seeks to encourage economic diversity by helping new and varied forms of wealth creation and employment. Diversification, which is ancillary to the use of the farmstead, can assist in securing the long-term viability of existing businesses. Agriculture is experiencing increasingly severe economic pressure and the continued viability of significant numbers of farm businesses depend upon diversifying enterprises including development of non-agricultural enterprises. 

5.4.38.

Farm diversification may take a number of different forms. Examples of these include teleworking centres, holiday accommodation, farm shops, craft workshops and market gardens. The diversification of existing farmsteads may require the construction of new purpose built structures to accommodate diversification needs. The Plan recognises that a farm should not be disadvantaged in its attempts to diversify merely because there is no suitable building available for conversion. However, development will be strictly regulated in order to ensure that only structures that are necessary for the purposes of diversification are constructed. Proposals for the conversion of rural buildings into residential accommodation will be assessed in accordance with the requirements of Policy ENV 8. 

5.4.39.

For the purposes of this policy farmsteads are defined as part of a farm comprising its main buildings together with immediate adjoining land.

POLICY EMP 8 - AGRICULTURAL ENTERPRISE AND ASSOCIATED DEVELOPMENT

PROPOSALS FOR DEVELOPMENT ON AGRICULTURAL LAND WILL BE PERMITTED IF THE PROPOSAL:

  1. IS NECESSARY FOR THE PURPOSES OF AGRICULTURE WITHIN THE AGRICULTURAL UNIT;
  2. IS DESIGNED SPECIFICALLY FOR AGRICULTURAL PURPOSES;
  3. IS COMPATIBLE WITH THE SURROUNDING LANDSCAPE, ADJACENT LAND USES, AND ANY EXISTING RELATED STRUCTURES IN TERMS OF SCALE, SITING, DESIGN AND EXTERNAL APPEARANCE OF ANY NEW BUILDING OR EXTENSION TO EXISTING BUILDINGS; AND
  4. DOES NOT HAVE AN UNACCEPTABLE IMPACT ON AREAS OF ECOLOGICAL, WILDLIFE, GEOLOGICAL AND GEOMORPHOLOGICAL, ARCHAEOLOGICAL OR LANDSCAPE IMPORTANCE.
5.4.40.

Planning Policy Wales 2002 highlights the fact that an efficient and flexible agricultural industry is essential. It also states that local planning authorities should adopt a constructive approach towards agricultural development proposals, especially those which are designed to meet the needs of changing farming practices, or are necessary to achieve compliance with new environmental, hygiene or welfare legislation. 

5.4.41.

The Council recognises the role of agricultural industry in the rural areas of the Vale of Glamorgan and the contribution agriculture makes to the local economy. In 1993 a total of 1008 persons were engaged in work in 471 agricultural holdings in the Vale of Glamorgan (Digest of Welsh Local Area Statistics 1997: Welsh Assembly Government). Agriculture is also central to many of the attractive definitive landscape characteristics of the rural Vale. 

5.4.42.

The Council is keen to ensure the maintenance of existing, and development of, viable agricultural enterprises. It is necessary to ensure that new development associated with new or existing agricultural enterprises does not have an unacceptable effect on the surrounding environment, existing buildings, or the best quality agricultural land. 

5.4.43.

A recent trend in farming has seen the selling off or subdivisions of larger traditional farm holdings into small units. Owners often wish to try farming on a small scale. ‘Hobby farmers’, as they have become known, will often apply for agricultural buildings on these small parcels of land. Howeverapplications for the construction of agricultural buildings will not be approved on some small parcels of land, particularly where agricultural activity is limited. 

5.4.44.

Therefore the Council will require the applicant to show that the proposed development is essential for the purposes of established agricultural activity on the site and is not just based on personal preferences or circumstances. Such proposals put increased pressure for built development in the countryside and unless such development is totally justified for agricultural or forestry activities, proposals will not be permitted. 

5.4.45.

It should be noted that proposals for agricultural enterprise and associated development including farm diversification will also be assessed according to Policies ENV 1, ENV 2, ENV 8, ENV 27, HOUS 5, EMP 7 and MIN 7.

POLICY EMP 9 - NON-CONFORMING BUSINESS AND INDUSTRIAL USES

PART OF THE ATLANTIC TRADING ESTATE IS ALLOCATED FOR SUITABLE NON-CONFORMING BUSINESS AND INDUSTRIAL USES. 

View Map 

5.4.46.

This policy relates to the particular part of this site identified on the Proposals Map. It identifies sites for “sui generis” businesses, that is those not identified in the business and industrial use classes B1, B2 and B8, and which would not normally be appropriate on other business sites. In this respect, this Policy does not relate to any primary retail based industry. The fact that this site is identified for this type of use in no way means it should not be subject to environmental safeguards including the provision of suitable landscaping. Where appropriate development proposals will be subject to an environmental assessment in accordance with the Welsh Office Circular 11/99. 

5.4.47.

The fact that part of the site is identified under this policy does not mean that B1, B2 and B8 uses are not acceptable.

POLICY EMP 10 - RAF ST ATHAN

FURTHER APPROPRIATE DEVELOPMENTS IN RESPECT OF RAF ACTIVITY WITHIN THE RAF ST. ATHAN BASE WILL BE FAVOURED PROVIDED THERE IS NO UNACCEPTABLE IMPACT ON LOCAL AMENITY. 

View Map

5.4.48.

The RAF Base at St. Athan provides an important source of employment for the local economy. Appropriate expansion, within the boundaries shown on the Proposal Map, will be supported, subject to environmental considerations. 

5.4.49.

Hotels

At present there is not a statutory definition of what constitutes a hotel. However, the European Community defines it as:

“Any establishment that is commercially operated under the name hotel, boarding house, inn, tavern, motel or other equivalent designation and offers accommodation for at least 10 paying guests.” (EEC 1986)"

This definition will be used for the purposes of the Unitary Development Plan.

5.4.50.

Planning Policy Wales Technical Advice Note (Wales) 13 Tourism (1997) gives guidance on hotels and replaces the former PPG 21. The guidance refers to the many historic buildings that are used as hotels. It states that carefully designed additions can be achieved without adversely affecting the historic fabric or character and enables a historic building to be maintained in a viable use. It is also pointed out that the conservation of redundant or obsolete buildings such as warehouses, railway stations or agricultural buildings can also lend themselves well to adaptation and modernisation as motels and hotels, therefore bringing back into economic beneficial use neglected buildings and sites. 

5.4.51.

The guidance emphasises that large scale building in small scale settings, buildings which break prominently into the skyline, and those which by their design, materials, illumination or building line are out of sympathy with neighbouring historic settings will normally be unacceptable. However, moderate sized extensions to existing hotels, including an increase in bedroom accommodation, is recognised as helping the future viability of a hotel or motel business, whilst also satisfying tourism need. But such extensions must not involve any disproportionate increase in scale.

POLICY TOUR 1 - NEW HOTELS IN THE COUNTRYSIDE

PROPOSALS FOR NEW HOTELS OUTSIDE THE DESIGNATED SETTLEMENT BOUNDARIES OF THE TOWNS AND VILLAGES DEFINED BY POLICY HOUS 2 WILL NOT BE PERMITTED. PROPOSALS FOR HOTELS WHICH INVOLVE THE CONVERSION OR EXTENSION OF EXISTING BUILDINGS OUTSIDE SETTLEMENT BOUNDARIES WILL BE PERMITTED IF ALL OF THE FOLLOWING CRITERIA ARE MET:

  1. THE SCALE OF THE PROPOSAL OR ANY PROPOSED EXTENSION IS IN KEEPING WITH SURROUNDING USES;
  2. THE PROPOSAL DOES NOT UNACCEPTABLY AFFECT THE INTERESTS OF AGRICULTURE, CONSERVATION, AREAS OF ECOLOGICAL, WILDLIFE, LANDSCAPE OR ARCHAEOLOGICAL IMPORTANCE;
  3. THE PROPOSAL DOES NOT UNACCEPTABLY AFFECT THE AMENITY AND THE HARACTER OF THE EXISTING OR NEIGHBOURING ENVIRONMENTS BY VIRTUE OF NOISE, TRAFFIC CONGESTION, EXACERBATION OF PARKING PROBLEMS, OR VISUAL INTRUSION;
  4. THE PROPOSALS MEET HIGH STANDARDS OF LAYOUT, LANDSCAPING AND DESIGN AND HAS SAFE VEHICULAR ACCESS;
  5. ADEQUATE UTILITY AND INFRASTRUCTURE SERVICES EXIST, ARE REASONABLY ACCESSIBLE, OR CAN BE READILY AND ECONOMICALLY PROVIDED;
  6. SUITABLE ACCESS IS PROVIDED FOR DISABLED PERSONS AND THOSE WITH IMPAIRED MOVEMENT;
  7. PARKING IS PROVIDED IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE COUNCIL'S APPROVED GUIDELINES.

POLICY TOUR 2 - NEW HOTELS IN URBAN AREAS

PROPOSALS FOR NEW HOTELS WITHIN URBAN AREAS WILL BE STRICTLY CONTROLLED.

ANY PROPOSALS FOR NEW HOTELS IN URBAN AREAS AND EXTENSIONS TO EXISTING ACCOMMODATION WILL BE PERMITTED IF:

  1. THE SCALE OF THE PROPOSAL OR ANY PROPOSED EXTENSION IS IN KEEPING WITH SURROUNDING USES;
  2. THE PROPOSAL DOES NOT UNACCEPTABLY AFFECT THE AMENITY AND THE CHARACTER OF THE EXISTING OR NEIGHBOURING ENVIRONMENTS BY VIRTUE OF NOISE, TRAFFIC CONGESTION, EXACERBATION OF PARKING PROBLEMS, OR VISUAL INTRUSION;
  3. THE PROPOSAL MEETS HIGH STANDARDS OF LAYOUT, LANDSCAPING AND DESIGN AND HAS SAFE VEHICULAR ACCESS;
  4. ADEQUATE UTILITY AND INFRASTRUCTURE SERVICES EXIST, ARE REASONABLY ACCESSIBLE, OR CAN BE READILY AND ECONOMICALLY PROVIDED;
  5. SUITABLE ACCESS IS PROVIDED FOR DISABLED PERSONS AND THOSE WITH IMPAIRED MOVEMENT; AND
  6. PARKING IS PROVIDED IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE COUNCIL'S APPROVED GUIDELINES.
5.4.52.

The Council recognises that there is a limited need in some market segments for additional hotel accommodation in the Vale of Glamorgan. In line with the Council's strategic tourism objectives, proposals in appropriate locations that fulfil the above criteria will be favoured, taking into account the level of existing provision and extant planning permissions. Both policies will assist in preventing market uncertainty and in turn improve the range and quality of hotel accommodation. 

5.4.53.

Other Services Accommodation

Other serviced accommodation includes the conversion of existing buildings to guest houses and bed and breakfast accommodation.

POLICY TOUR 3 - CONVERSION OF BUILDINGS TO GUEST HOUSES AND BED AND BREAKFAST ACCOMMODATION WITHIN SETTLEMENT BOUNDARIES

PROPOSALS FOR THE CONVERSION OF EXISTING BUILDINGS WITHIN SETTLEMENT BOUNDARIES TO GUEST HOUSES AND BED AND BREAKFAST ACCOMMODATION WILL BE PERMITTED IF:

  1. THE SCALE OF THE PROPOSAL OR ANY PROPOSED EXTENSION IS IN KEEPING WITH SURROUNDING USES;
  2. THE PROPOSAL DOES NOT UNACCEPTABLY AFFECT THE INTERESTS OF AGRICULTURE, CONSERVATION, AREAS OF ECOLOGICAL, WILDLIFE, LANDSCAPE OR ARCHAEOLOGICAL IMPORTANCE;
  3. THE PROPOSAL DOES NOT HAVE AN UNACCEPTABLE EFFECT UPON THE AMENITY AND CHARACTER OF THE EXISTING OR NEIGHBOURING ENVIRONMENTS BY VIRTUE OF NOISE, TRAFFIC CONGESTION, EXACERBATION OF PARKING PROBLEMS, OR VISUAL INTRUSION;
  4. THE PROPOSAL MEETS HIGH STANDARDS OF LAYOUT, LANDSCAPING AND DESIGN AND HAS SAFE VEHICULAR ACCESS;
  5. ADEQUATE UTILITY AND INFRASTRUCTURE SERVICES EXIST, ARE REASONABLY ACCESSIBLE, OR CAN BE READILY AND ECONOMICALLY PROVIDED;
  6. SUITABLE ACCESS IS PROVIDED FOR DISABLED PERSONS AND THOSE WITH IMPAIRED MOVEMENT; AND
  7. PARKING IS PROVIDED IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE COUNCIL'S APPROVED GUIDELINES.
5.4.54.

Whilst the Council supports the expansion of good quality tourist facilities such as guest houses and bed and breakfast accommodation in the Vale, it considers these are best located in existing towns and villages. However, in accordance with TAN 13, the conversion of redundant or obsolete buildings in the countryside for tourism uses can have a beneficial effect by conserving and bringing into beneficial use neglected buildings, or rural buildings without any future economic use. 

5.4.55.

TAN 13 also points out that the planning system can respond to changes in tourism demand without compromising policies to safeguard the countryside. Where the criteria to Policy ENV 8 on rural building conversions can be met, it may be appropriate for the local planning authority to grant permission for rural conversions to tourist accommodation with a condition specifying its use as holiday accommodation only.

POLICY TOUR 4 - CARAVAN, CHALET AND TENT SITES

FURTHER DEVELOPMENT OR EXPANSION OF STATIC AND TOURING CARAVAN SITES, CHALET AND TENT SITES IN THE COASTAL ZONE WILL NOT BE PERMITTED. PROPOSALS FOR ADDITIONAL SITES OUTSIDE THE BOUNDARY OF THE GLAMORGAN HERITAGE COAST AND OTHER PARTS OF THE COASTAL ZONE WILL BE PERMITTED IF:

  1. THE SCALE OF THE PROPOSAL OR ANY PROPOSED EXTENSION IS IN KEEPING WITH SURROUNDING USES;
  2. THE PROPOSAL DOES NOT UNACCEPTABLY AFFECT THE INTERESTS OF AGRICULTURE, CONSERVATION, AREAS OF ECOLOGICAL, WILDLIFE, LANDSCAPE OR ARCHAEOLOGICAL IMPORTANCE;
  3. THE PROPOSAL DOES NOT HAVE AN UNACCEPTABLE EFFECT UPON THE AMENITY AND CHARACTER OF THE EXISTING OR NEIGHBOURING ENVIRONMENTS BY VIRTUE OF NOISE, TRAFFIC CONGESTION, EXACERBATION OF PARKING PROBLEMS, OR VISUAL INTRUSION;
  4. THE PROPOSAL MEETS HIGH STANDARDS OF LAYOUT, LANDSCAPING AND DESIGN AND HAS SAFE VEHICULAR ACCESS;
  5. ADEQUATE UTILITY AND INFRASTRUCTURE SERVICES EXIST, ARE REASONABLY ACCESSIBLE, OR CAN BE READILY AND ECONOMICALLY PROVIDED;
  6. SUITABLE ACCESS IS PROVIDED FOR DISABLED PERSONS AND THOSE WITH IMPAIRED MOVEMENT;
  7. PARKING IS PROVIDED IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE COUNCIL'S APPROVED GUIDELINES; AND
  8. THE SITE IS NOT IN AN AREA WHERE THERE IS A RISK OF FLOODING.
IN THE CASE OF STATIC SITES ALL CARAVANS AND CHALETS MUST BE FINISHED IN SUITABLE COUNTRYSIDE COLOURS TO BE AGREED WITH THE LOCAL PLANNING AUTHORITY PRIOR TO THE COMMENCEMENT OF DEVELOPMENT. (THE BRITISH STANDARDS INSTITUTION DOCUMENT, REFERENCE PP6491 1980, SETS OUT THE PREFERRED RANGE OF BODY AND TRIM COLOURS FOR PERMANENT RESIDENTIAL AND HOLIDAY CARAVANS.)
5.4.56.

In Britain as a whole, 13 million people take holidays in caravans. The Vale of Glamorgan has always been popular for caravan, chalet and tenting holidays. TAN 13 gives advice on holiday and touring caravans. It states that development plans need to ensure that there are adequate facilities and choices of sites for the touring and static caravanner. TAN 13 states that new sites should be effectively screened and should not be allowed immediately by the sea, but set back a short distance away from the coast. 

5.4.57.

Planning Policy Wales Technical Advice Note (Wales) 15 Development and Flood Risk (2004) requires local authorities to consult the Environment Agency when considering applications for sites with a high risk of flooding. Also, in the interests of safety, the caravanning organisations should be encouraged to liase with the local planning authority about flooding risks that may apply to "certificated" sites which do not require planning permission.

POLICY TOUR 5 - NON-RESIDENTIAL TOURIST ATTRACTIONS

PROPOSALS FOR NON-RESIDENTIAL TOURIST ATTRACTIONS WITHIN THE PLAN AREA WILL BE PERMITTED IF:

  1. THE SCALE OF THE PROPOSAL OR ANY PROPOSED EXTENSION IS IN KEEPING WITH SURROUNDING USES;
  2. THE PROPOSAL DOES NOT UNACCEPTABLY AFFECT THE INTERESTS OF AGRICULTURE, CONSERVATION, AREAS OF ECOLOGICAL, WILDLIFE, LANDSCAPE OR ARCHAEOLOGICAL IMPORTANCE;
  3. THE PROPOSAL DOES NOT HAVE AN UNACCEPTABLE EFFECT UPON THE AMENITY AND CHARACTER OF THE EXISTING OR NEIGHBOURING ENVIRONMENTS BY VIRTUE OF NOISE, TRAFFIC CONGESTION, EXACERBATION OF PARKING PROBLEMS, OR VISUAL INTRUSION;
  4. THE PROPOSAL MEETS HIGH STANDARDS OF LAYOUT, LANDSCAPING AND DESIGN AND HAS SAFE VEHICULAR ACCESS;
  5. ADEQUATE UTILITY AND INFRASTRUCTURE SERVICES EXIST, ARE REASONABLY ACCESSIBLE, OR CAN BE READILY AND ECONOMICALLY PROVIDED;
  6. SUITABLE ACCESS IS PROVIDED FOR DISABLED PERSONS AND THOSE WITH IMPAIRED MOVEMENT; AND
  7. PARKING IS PROVIDED IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE COUNCIL'S APPROVED GUIDELINES.
5.4.58.

Proposals for tourist attractions are often likely to seek locations within the countryside. This policy will ensure that tourist attractions which are considered appropriate will be related and in keeping with the surrounding countryside. Elsewhere it is important that any proposals for new tourist attractions are compatible with neighbouring land uses. 

5.4.59.

Barry Island

Barry Island has been a popular resort for day-trippers and holidaymakers for many years and remains the main tourist destination in the Vale. The majority of the Island's activities are centred on the extensive sandy beach at Whitmore Bay. Overlooking the Bay are the Promenade Gardens and the Barry Island Pleasure Park containing over 50 different rides and attractions. Souvenir shops, restaurants and arcades complement the scene. The Council places great importance on the ongoing environmental improvement programme for Barry Island, which aims to further enhance its tourist potential. This is reflected in the refurbishment of Barry Island Station Buildings for a new Steam Railway Heritage Centre, enhancements to the promenade and a new traffic management scheme with high quality street furniture and landscaping.

Steam Railway, Barry 

5.4.60.

The proposed redevelopment of Barry Waterfront will also provide opportunities for tourism related developments adjoining Barry Island. The Council is particularly keen to encourage stronger linkages between Barry Island, Barry Waterfront and the town centre, and to attract new tourist attractions and accommodation in this area that widens the market and extends the seasonal spread of activities. 

5.4.61.

Penarth

The Council recognises the special character of the seafront at Penarth and is committed to an ongoing programme of renovation to the pier, a Grade II Listed Building. Penarth's proximity to Cardiff Bay means that its future will be strongly influenced by the regeneration of this area. The construction of the Cardiff Bay Barrage and the completion of a proposed pedestrian and cycleway around Penarth Head offer opportunities to attract more visitors to the town thereby enhancing the local economy. The highway network in and around the Barrage end of Penarth Haven has limited capacity. This is an important area, which will become increasingly busy with the completion of the Barrage. Although an element of additional car parking provision will be necessary it will be important to ensure that the needs of alternative modes of transport are also considered. The layout of any new junctions, roads or car parks will need to be carefully considered in order to minimise any potential conflict with cyclists and pedestrians. Safe and convenient facilities for cyclists will be needed, together with public transport services and passenger waiting facilities. The use of traffic calming measures will also be considered to reduce any potential road safety problems.

Panoramic view of the Cardiff Bay Barrage at Penarth 

5.5.

IMPLEMENTATION

5.5.1.

Achievement of the aspirations for economic development in the Vale of Glamorgan will require a combined effort by public and private bodies alike. A prime mover in respect of development will be the private sector, but through investment in infrastructure and the environment, public agencies have an important role to play. In this respect, the availability of resources, and in particular, grant assistanceis crucial. 

5.5.2.

The Vale of Glamorgan Council is committed to creating the right environment for investment and will seek partnerships with the private sector, the Welsh Assembly Government, the Welsh Development Agency, ELWa, Barry College, the Wales Tourist Board, the European Commission, and other relevant agencies. 

5.5.3.

As Barry serves a much wider area in terms of its economy and employment potential, Barry Action's programme for the regeneration of the town is of particular importance, as is the Joint Initiative between the Welsh Development Agency and Associated British Ports. 

5.5.4.

Barry Action, the Council's partnership between the Council and the WDA has a broad remit. It is concerned with the economic and physical regeneration of Barry as a whole, including the town centre, Barry Island and the Docks. 

5.5.5.

Through its development control function the Council can influence the type and location of tourist facilities. The Council is also aware of the importance of the tourist industry as a valuable source of employment and income. Through advice and direct financial assistance (in conjunction with other relevant agencies) the Council will assist appropriate tourist related development proposals. To provide a strategic supporting service to the tourist industry, the Council has a specialist Tourism unit which works closely with development control and planning policy. 

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