6. Transportation

6.1.

INTRODUCTION

The Vale of Glamorgan Line at Porthkerry Park
6.1.1.

Transportation issues are fundamental to many areas of planning policy in the Vale of Glamorgan. A sound range of strategic and local transport policies provides the means not only to cater for movement within and between existing developments (by a range of modes) but also to act as a catalyst for development in appropriate locations.

6.1.2.

A good transport network serves a number of different functions for a wide range of different users simultaneously. It is a vital component of a healthy economy in providing for the efficient movement of goods and people, and is important for ensuring continued access for Vale residents to employment opportunities. At the same time the network must also provide a means for journeys for a range of different everyday purposes, between many origins and destinations, and by a range of modes.

6.1.3.

Transport in the Vale of Glamorgan is dominated by several key issues:

  • Increasing the market accessibility of Barry as a location for development, and the need to facilitate movement to employment opportunities; 
  • Strategic peak period commuter movements between the Vale and Cardiff;
  • The importance of serving Cardiff International Airport and associated developments;
  • The development of facilities for travel by means other than the private car; and
  • Maintenance of accessibility.
6.1.4.

Traffic on the busy Port Road linking Barry to Culverhouse Cross There are essentially three main corridors of movement in the Vale of Glamorgan each with distinct characteristics. A corridor along the Waterfront Strip links Llantwit Major, Barry and Penarth to Cardiff. Movement along this corridor is largely car based, however it is this corridor which offers the most opportunities to develop public transport facilities, with the proposal to reintroduce passenger services on the Vale of Glamorgan Line and improved bus links with Cardiff. A second corridor covers the northern Vale of Glamorgan, roughly centred on the A48 and incorporating the Rural Vale. This corridor is typical of many rural areas with the private car being an important feature. Remoteness from employment and services, together with limited opportunities  for alternative forms of transport has led to a relatively high rate of car ownership. However there remains an important role for public transport in this corridor to ensure accessibility for residents to employment and services. The third corridor consists of journeys  between the Waterfront Strip and Culverhouse Cross and the M4 motorway to the north. Again movement in this corridor is largely car based.

6.1.5.

The Vale of Glamorgan is affected by the major national transport trends such as the high level of reliance on the private car, the growth in the number and average length of trips, decreasing public transport patronage, and associated environmental impacts.

6.1.6.

Although the private car has been liberating in terms of providing travel opportunities and independence, the greater use of cars has created a more mobile population. This has led to pressure for a more dispersed pattern of development and a corresponding growth in the number and length of trips, and associated environmental problems.

6.1.7.

At the same time there has been a marked decline in public transport patronage which must be addressed through the provision of better facilities and increased opportunities for individuals to travel by public transport.

6.1.8.

Therefore the role of this Plan is to provide a planning policy framework to address the combined effects of both local / regional transport issues and national trends.

6.1.9.

However it is important to note that these policies are related to transportation matters associated with land use and the actual development of land. Transport policies in this UDP represent only one part of the package of measures which will be necessary for tackling major transport issues.

6.1.10.

A basic requirement for the long term development of the transportation network in the Vale of Glamorgan is that a range of equally convenient, safe and comfortable modes should be available. Individuals should have the option to choose and select the most appropriate mode to conduct their journey or integrate two or more different modes to reach their destinations.

6.2.

NATIONAL PLANNING GUIDANCE

6.2.1.

Planning Policy Wales 2002 sets out the Government's land use planning policies as they apply in Wales. Transport and infrastructure accounts for a significant section of this guidance, with the stated aim being:

“To extend choice in transport and secure accessibility in a way which supports
sustainable development by encouraging the establishment of an integrated
transport system which is safe, efficient, clean and fair. This will be achieved
through integration:

  • within and between different types of transport;
  • between transport measures and land use planning;
  • between transport measures and policies to protect and improve the environment; and
  • between transport measures and policies for education, health, social inclusion and wealth creation.”
6.2.2.

The importance of the relationship between transport and land use is highlighted, as is reducing the need to travel. The need to recognise the increasing economic role of Cardiff International Airport is also addressed. With regard to public transport the Guidance notes that alternatives to the private car should be promoted in order to achieve environmental goals and assist in the relief of congestion. Various measures are included such as reservation of road space for the provision of facilities for bus users and the potential for reopening rail lines. The Guidance states that the likely availability and use of public transport is a very important ingredient in determining locational policies designed to reduce the need to travel by car. However, the importance of including any firm proposals for both major and minor improvements to the road network is also considered, and the need to ensure that proposed routes are safeguarded. The Guidance also states that routes for roads should make the best use of existing land forms and other landscape features to reduce noise and visual effects, subject to safety and other environmental considerations.

6.2.3.

The strong interaction between transport and land use planning has also been recognised by central Government in the joint DoT and DoE “PPG13- A Guide to Better Practice”. This document notes that the provision of new transport infrastructure can influence the pattern of development and conversely new development can influence the demand for travel. However, it also points out that the scope for influencing travel demand patterns solely through land use planning is limited.

6.2.4.

Cycling has also been developing an increasing profile with the publication of the Government's National Cycling Strategy DoT 1996. This strategy aims to promote the role of cycling, to restore cycling as a comfortable and convenient transport choice, to double cycle use by 2002 and to double levels of use again by 2012.

6.3.

OBJECTIVES

6.3.1.

The Council's transportation policy objectives for the UDP are:

  • To ensure that a balance is maintained between the need to facilitate the development of the local economy, environmental concerns and social considerations, in order to create a safe, efficient and equitable transport network for the Vale of Glamorgan;
  • To maintain and improve access to employment and services;
  • To ensure that developments are accessible by means of travel other than the private car;
  • To encourage greater use of public transport, cycling and walking;
  • To safeguard road lines and routes / sites of approved transport schemes;
  • To improve the safety and convenience of all means of transport; and
  • To ensure that adequate parking facilities are provided in accordance with the Council's approved parking guidelines.
6.4.

POLICIES AND PROPOSALS

POLICY TRAN 1 - STRATEGIC HIGHWAYS

LAND WILL BE PROTECTED AND PROVISION MADE FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE STRATEGIC HIGHWAY NETWORK, INCLUDING:

6.4.1.

The provision of a strategic highway network is vital to the efficient movement of people and goods throughout the Vale of Glamorgan. There continues to be an important role for the development of strategic road schemes linking important employment sites with the national road network.

6.4.2.

Planning Policy Wales (2002) refers to the need to consider the increasing economic role of Cardiff International Airport. The importance of establishing a high quality road link to Cardiff International Airport from the M4 and Cardiff is seen as a unique strategic objective. In providing a high quality fast link, the Airport Access Road will serve new development at the Airport, Barry Waterfront and Pencoedtre. It will relieve the congested major interchange at Culverhouse Cross, remove through traffic, improve environmental and road safety problems at the existing residential areas of Wenvoe and North Barry, and relieve the existing road network to the benefit of public transport, cyclists and pedestrians. The Council remains keen to encourage improved public transport links, both bus and rail, to Cardiff International Airport, as outlined in the text accompanying Policy TRAN 3.

6.4.3.

The purpose of the Barry Waterfront to Cardiff Link Road is twofold: firstly to provide a link between the major development at Barry Docks and the trunk road motorway network via the A4231 and also to Cardiff and Cardiff Bay via the A4055; and secondly to alleviate traffic congestion and improve road safety on the A4055 through Dinas Powys.

6.4.4.

These major road schemes will significantly improve the “market accessibility” of Barry and the Waterfront Strip. It is envisaged that with the construction of both of these schemes the potential for Barry to grow as a location for economic activity will be improved. Both these road schemes serve to facilitate development of the Barry Waterfront.

6.4.5.

It is also envisaged that the development of these strategic highways will also provide opportunities for public transport, cycling and walking improvements where strategic flows have been reduced and road space is released. This will in turn serve to discourage the return of through traffic.

POLICY TRAN 2 - LOCAL HIGHWAYS

LAND WILL BE PROTECTED AND PROVISION MADE FOR THE CONSTRUCTION OF LOCAL HIGHWAY SCHEMES INCLUDING:

  • LLYSWORNEY BYPASS;
  • GILESTON OLD MILL; AND
  • BOVERTON RELIEF ROAD.
6.4.6.

These three schemes are necessary to alleviate existing environmental problems and for safety improvements as described in Part One Policy No.7.

6.4.7.

The Llysworney Bypass scheme is important to relieve environmental and safety problems caused by a significant number of heavy lorry movements through the village. At present the lorries use the B4270, which runs through the village of Llysworney, as it provides a major access route to the A48 for businesses located on the industrial estates at Llandow.

6.4.8.

Movement along the B4265 was significantly improved by the construction of the Rhoose and Llantwit Major Bypasses. However, there remains one section of this road, between Aberthaw and St. Athan, where a sharp bend in the road creates a potential safety problem. The Gileston Old Mill Scheme aims to improve both the horizontal and vertical alignments of the highway at this section.

6.4.9.

The road link into Boverton from the Llantwit Major By-Pass includes a narrow sharp corner which is ill-suited to the amount of traffic using the road. The Boverton Relief Road aims to provide a more direct route allowing traffic to avoid this section of highway, thereby reducing environmental problems and the risk of accident.

6.4.10.

To further address environmental and safety concerns, the Council will seek to implement a number of smaller scale highway improvements during the Plan period. Many of these schemes will be on-line improvements on existing highway, however some may require small areas of land. The exact details of any land necessary for these improvements will become apparent at the design stage.

POLICY TRAN 3 - RAIL DEVELOPMENT

THE DEVELOPMENT OF RAIL FACILITIES WILL INCLUDE:

  1. THE PROVISION OF A NEW RAIL STATION TO SERVE BARRY WATERFRONT; AND
  2. THE REOPENING OF THE VALE OF GLAMORGAN RAILWAY LINE TO PASSENGER SERVICES.
6.4.11.

Along with bus improvements rail development is central to the provision of a public transport system to serve the Vale of Glamorgan throughout the Plan period. The increasing focus on the need to provide individuals with a range of modes for their journeys, and problems of growth in length and number of trips, means that travel by rail must be encouraged.

6.4.12.

It is important to ensure that the regeneration of Barry Waterfront incorporates opportunities for residents to travel by a range of modes. In order to provide this range the provision of a new rail station is vital. This station would provide access to the Waterfront area by rail, and also provide improved access to Barry central area by rail. The Council will consult with interested parties regarding the exact location of the station. A new station will contribute to securing wider regeneration and economic development benefits, particularly having regard to a potential synergy with retail development.

6.4.13.

The new station at Rhoose The Vale of Glamorgan line connects Barry with Bridgend, and is currently used for freight services and for occasional diverted passenger services. At present scheduled passenger services are not available west of Barry. The Council aims to achieve the reintroduction of passenger services on this line, including the development of through services via Bridgend. Funding, through Transport Grant from the Welsh Assembly Government, has been secured for the project and it is anticipated that passenger services on the line will resume during 2004. This scheme would provide residents of Llantwit Major and Rhoose with rail services, and would also provide an opportunity to introduce a service to Cardiff International Airport. The Council is also keen to develop existing rail facilities, through the Vale Rail Corridor Improvements project. This scheme aims to promote rail travel along this corridor through the development of projects such as improvements to passenger facilities, passenger information and park and ride, on both the Barry and Penarth lines.

POLICY TRAN 4 - INTERCHANGE AT RAIL STATIONS

PROPOSALS FOR NEW RAIL STATIONS SHOULD INCLUDE ADEQUATE FACILITIES FOR INTERCHANGE BETWEEN RAIL AND OTHER MODES, INCLUDING CAR, BUS AND CYCLING. PROPOSALS FOR DEVELOPMENT OF FACILITIES FOR INTERCHANGE BETWEEN RAIL AND CAR, BUS OR CYCLING AT EXISTING RAIL STATIONS WILL BE FAVOURED.

6.4.14.

The role of park and ride in the Vale of Glamorgan is important and new stations should where possible incorporate this facility. To encourage greater use of park and rides, new and existing facilities should incorporate adequate security measures. It will also be necessary to ensure that suitable dropping off points are provided.

6.4.15.

Bus interchange at Llantwit Major station The development of public transport improvements associated with existing and proposed rail facilities will be important as the role of public transport increases and as seamless interchange between different public transport modes becomes crucial. Provision of bus facilities adjacent to rail stations will ensure that an increased number of journey options can be served by public transport.

6.4.16.

Facilities for cyclists at new rail stations will also provide a means of interchange between modes and further reduce the need to use the private car.

POLICY TRAN 5 - REDUNDANT RAIL ROUTES & FACILITIES

REDUNDANT RAIL ROUTES AND FACILITIES WILL BE PROTECTED FROM DEVELOPMENT WHICH WOULD INHIBIT FUTURE TRANSPORT USE.

6.4.17.

This policy will ensure that disused rail lines which are no longer necessary to meet existing requirements are safeguarded for future use, including public transport, cycling or pedestrian uses. It is important to avoid the severance of disused transport routes by small scale, piecemeal development. Redundant rail lines can provide particularly useful opportunities to introduce cycling and pedestrian facilities, as the routes in the Vale of Glamorgan are typically characterised by level surfaces and attractive surroundings. The suitability of former rail lines for cycling and pedestrian uses is clearly illustrated by the success of work carried out by Sustrans.

POLICY TRAN 6 - RAIL FREIGHT

DEVELOPMENT WHICH WOULD ATTRACT A SIGNIFICANT AMOUNT OF FREIGHT MOVEMENT WILL BE FAVOURED WHERE EXISTING OR POTENTIAL RAIL FACILITIES ARE AVAILABLE.

6.4.18.

The majority of freight is transported by road over both long and relatively short distances. The transport of freight by rail is often thought to be most suited to bulk movements over long distance, although these have declined with traditional heavy industry. However, rail can provide an attractive option when interchange with road freight is included, and play a crucial part in reducing the number of long range trips by road. This policy therefore aims to maintain existing facilities for freight transport by rail, and to encourage any opportunities for the transfer of freight movement from road to rail where appropriate. The policy also acts in conjunction with other policies to encourage developments which would attract a significant level of freight movement to locate where access to existing or potential rail freight facilities is available.

POLICY TRAN 7 - STRATEGIC PUBLIC TRANSPORT

LAND WILL BE PROTECTED AND PROVISION MADE FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF FACILITIES FOR BUS OPERATIONS INCLUDING BETWEEN:

  1. BARRY, DINAS POWYS AND CARDIFF; 
  2. CARDIFF INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT, BARRY, WENVOE AND CULVERHOUSE CROSS;
  3. PENARTH AND CARDIFF; AND
  4. BETWEEN THE VALE OF GLAMORGAN AND BRIDGEND.
6.4.19.

This Policy adds more detail to the public transport measures referred to in Part 1, Policy 7. It is the Council's intention to improve facilities and to promote the efficient operation and movement of buses and bus passengers. Although on these corridors there are many measures that can be developed within the boundary of the existing highway, there may be areas where further land will be required for the provision of bus stations, turning areas, bus priorities or bus lanes.

6.4.20.

The development of measures to facilitate bus operations in the corridors identified in this policy will complement the measures outlined in paragraph 6.4.5. Where the development of a new road scheme relieves an existing road of heavy traffic flows it will be important to use that opportunity to the benefit of sustainable movement options, and deter the continued use of that road as a through route by traffic. The road space on the existing road will be used to cater for the safe, convenient and efficient movement of buses, cyclists and pedestrians. This will be achieved through the provision of additional facilities for buses, in conjunction with traffic management, traffic calming, cycling and pedestrian improvements.

6.4.21.

Buses serving Bridgend It will be important to cater for bus links from Bridgend County Borough Council's area through the Vale of Glamorgan towards Cardiff. Any measures on this corridor will be coordinated with Bridgend County Borough Council and Cardiff County Council. The Council will also endeavor to establish a Quality Partnership with public transport operators on all the above corridors.

POLICY TRAN 8 - CARDIFF INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

THE CONTINUED USE AND DEVELOPMENT OF CARDIFF INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT TO CATER FOR ALL TYPES OF AIR TRAFFIC WILL BE FAVOURED

6.4.22.

Cardiff International Airport is an important strategic transport facility for South Wales, dealing with domestic and international passenger and freight movements. In recent years the airport has enjoyed increases in patronage, and has widened its range of destinations. The development strategy for the Airport aims to develop facilities to cater for up to 3.6 million passengers per annum.

6.4.23.

This level of passenger traffic and the need to serve business development at the airport will require significant improvements to both private and public transport access. It is intended that the development of the Airport Access Road, included in Policy TRAN 1, will cater for the increased demand for private transport access to the Airport in providing a high quality fast link from Cardiff and the M4. It is also envisaged that the development of rail improvements on the Vale of Glamorgan Line will incorporate a link to the Airport by shuttle bus from Rhoose, as described in the text supporting Policy TRAN 3. Any improvements to the existing scheduled bus services to the airport will also be favoured.

6.4.24.

It should also be noted that proposals for development within the safeguarding zones surrounding Cardiff International Airport and RAF St. Athan may have implications for aviation safety. Therefore the Civil Aviation Authority and the Ministry of Defence will be consulted where appropriate.

POLICY TRAN 9 - CYCLING DEVELOPMENT

LAND WILL BE PROTECTED AND PROVISION MADE FOR CYCLE ROUTES INCLUDING:

  1. SAFE AND CONVENIENT LINKS WITHIN AND BETWEEN THE VALE OF GLAMORGAN AND CARDIFF; 
  2. LINKS WITH THE NATIONAL CYCLE NETWORK;
  3. CYCLE PARKING FACILITIES; AND
  4. A NETWORK OF ROUTES IN THE RURAL VALE.
6.4.25.

The National Cycling Strategy encourages local authorities, the private sector and voluntary groups to work towards a change in attitudes to cycling, and develop cycle infrastructure.

6.4.26.

The Council has approved the Vale of Glamorgan Cycling Strategy that seeks to develop cycling both as a form of transport in its own right and also for leisure and recreational purposes. Currently only 1.3% of all non-walking trips in the Vale of Glamorgan are made by bicycle, and 56% of all non-walking trips are less than five miles (a distance which could easily be covered by bicycle).

6.4.27.

The main aims of the Council's Strategy are the same as those in the National Cycling Strategy, basically to double the number of cycle trips made in the Vale of Glamorgan by 2002 and quadruple the number by 2012. Provision for cyclists will involve the development of a cycle route network provision of cycle parking, general promotion of cycling and development of a safe routes to school project. It is recognised that the targets represent a significant challenge, and it is important to realise that achieving these targets and the implementation of many of the measures in the Strategy will be reliant upon attaining suitable funding.

6.4.28.

Example of cycle lane in Penarth To develop any opportunities for “added value” for cyclists, the Council has adopted a cycle audit procedure of highway and traffic management schemes to encourage use of cycle friendly infrastructure. The needs of cyclists are also addressed in Policy ENV 27 which states that development should have a high level of accessibility for cyclists. In implementing ENV 27, developers are recommended to use reference documents such as “Cycle Friendly Infrastructure: Guidelines for Planning and Design” (Cyclists Touring Club, 1996) and “The National Cycle Network: Guidelines and Practical Details” (Sustrans / Ove Arup & Partners 1997). The development of links with the National Cycle Network and an integrated network will involve liaison with adjoining local authorities and other bodies. There also remains an important role for employers to encouragecycling, both for journeys to work and for use within work, and participate in schemes such as the Cyclists Touring Club's Cycle Friendly Employer Award.

6.4.29.

It is intended that the potential for the provision of cycle routes and facilities will be investigated during the Plan period, according to the Council's Cycling Strategy and together with innovative proposals emerging from the Council's Cycle Forum, including the following routes:

  1. Penarth to Dinas Powys;
  2. Lower Penarth to Sully via former railway line;
  3. Dinas Powys to Cardiff via Cwm George and Cwrt-yr-Ala Lane;
  4. Barry to Wenvoe and Cardiff;
  5. Cogan to Cardiff via a new bridge over the River Ely;
  6. Through Cosmeston Country Park and St Cyres Park; and
  7. Cowslip Estate to Cogan Leisure Centre and Cogan Station.
6.4.30.

Cycling developments are also included as part of Policy REC 12 which states that the Council will establish a number of recreation routes, some of which will incorporate cycling facilities. It is important to recognise that the Council will need to negotiate with local landowners regarding the implementation of cycle route proposals. The Council's current approved cycle parking guidelines set out the requirements for cycle parking facilities associated with different types of land use and development. Appendix 6 Table 6 illustrates examples of how the guidelines operate. These guidelines are based on the Standing Conference on Regional Policy in South Wales “Guidelines for the Provision of Facilities for Cyclists”. Similar to the operation of Car Parking Guidelines the Council retains the right to employ flexibility in its use of guidelines and to approve updated guidelines when necessary. One proposed route between the Vale of Glamorgan and Cardiff includes the Cogan cycle route. The Council is actively pursuing a route to be provided adjacent to the railway line between Cogan and West Point Industrial Estate, subject to a license agreement with Railtrack and Rail Property Ltd. The Council has received assistance from SUSTRANS in the negotiation of this license agreement. In the long term there is potential for this route to continue to Grangetown railway station. The proposed bridge over the River Ely will provide a direct link between Penarth Haven, Cogan, Cogan Station and the site of the proposed Sports Village. Any future development of a walk way along the River Ely and around the impounded lake created by the barrage should also incorporate safe and convenient cycling facilities.

POLICY TRAN 10 - Parking

THE PROVISION OF PARKING FACILITIES WILL BE IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE APPROVED PARKING GUIDELINES, AND WILL BE RELATED TO THE TYPE OF LAND USE, ITS DENSITY AND LOCATION; ACCESSIBILITY TO EXISTING AND POTENTIAL PUBLIC TRANSPORT FACILITIES; AND THE CAPACITY OF THE HIGHWAY NETWORK.

6.4.31.

Approved parking guidelines set out the requirements for parking facilities for different types of land use and development. Examples of how current guidelines are applied are included in Appendix 6 of the Plan. The guidelines have two basic aims: to assist developers, designers and builders in the preparation of and submission of planning applications; and to achieve a common approach to the provision of vehicle parking facilities associated with new development and change of use. There is scope for flexibility in the implementation of these guidelines when local considerations are taken into account.

6.4.32.

This policy embraces the flexible approach to parking requirements. It aims to provide scope for reduced parking facilities in locations well served by public transport. There may also be other circumstances when relaxed parking requirements may be appropriate, for example housing association development where there is clear evidence of low car ownership levels.

POLICY TRAN 11 - ROAD FREIGHT

IN ORDER TO REDUCE THE UNACCEPTABLE ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS OF HEAVY GOODS VEHICLES:

  1. DEVELOPMENTS WHICH GENERATE HGV MOVEMENTS WHICH WOULD UNACCEPTABLY AFFECT THE AMENITY AND CHARACTER OF THE EXISTING OR NEIGHBOURING ENVIRONMENTS BY VIRTUE OF NOISE, TRAFFIC CONGESTION, OR PARKING PROBLEMS WILL NOT BE PERMITTED; 
  2. SUFFICIENT OPERATIONAL PARKING WITHIN THE CURTILAGE OF HGV OPERATING CENTRES WILL BE REQUIRED; AND
  3. TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT MEASURES WILL BE USED WHERE APPROPRIATE.
6.4.33.

Many roads in the Vale of Glamorgan are not suited to modern heavy goods vehicles for reasons such as narrow carriageway and poor alignment. HGVs can also contribute to disruption due to air pollution and problems of noise and vibration. HGVs can cause more local problems, for example parking on the road can cause obstructions and traffic hazards, especially in residential areas where parking occurs overnight. The main distributor roads, including the improvements contained in this Plan, are the routes best capable of accommodating HGV movements.

6.4.34.

This policy is designed to ensure that developments which generate large numbers of HGV movements should not create unacceptable environmental effects, and must incorporate adequate parking facilities. If necessary, traffic management measures will be used to resolve persistent HGV problems. The Council will attempt to ensure that, via the development control process, business premises incorporate both operational and non-operational traffic within the curtilage of their sites according to the adopted parking guidelines. The prohibition of on-street parking will also be considered where appropriate.

POLICY TRAN 12 - PORT FACILITIES

THE CONTINUED USE AND CONSOLIDATION OF PORT FACILITIES FOR FREIGHT DISTRIBUTION WILL BE FAVOURED.

6.4.35.

The consolidation of port facilities in Barry has led to the release of land for redevelopment. However it is important to encourage the continued retention of a port facility at Barry. The transport of freight by sea provides practical means, and often the only realistic option, for moving large quantities of oil, construction and other bulk materials over long distances. The presence of coastal port facilities serves to reduce the need to transport these goods over long distance by road and allows the distribution of such goods over smaller distances from the port.

6.5.

IMPLEMENTATION

6.5.1.

The transportation policies in this chapter will be initially implemented by the Council, as the local highway authority, through its Transport Grant submissions. The implementation of the schemes proposed under several policies will therefore be subject to the availability of finance. However, the Council, as the local planning authority, can also act to influence transportation matters within the Vale of Glamorgan by guiding development too appropriate locations and ensuring that developments are served by appropriate transport facilities. Developers will be requested to submit a traffic impact assessment with planning applications for major development where the proposal is likely to have a significant effect on the surrounding highway network. These statements should include an assessment of the future effects of the development on capacity, safety and congestion levels on the highway in terms of traffic generation and also ensure that the development incorporates adequate public transport facilities to meet the generated demand and encourage public transport use. The statement should clearly identify the transport needs of the proposal and set out measures to accommodate the generated demand for travel by a range of modes including cycling and walking.

6.5.2.

Safer routes for cyclists and pedestrians Under section 106 of the Town and Country Planning Act 1990 (as substituted by section 12 of the Planning and Compensation Act 1991) the Council can seek to enter into planning obligations with developers regarding the use or development of land or buildings. Welsh Assembly Government Circular 13/97 “Planning Obligations” allows the Council to seek contributions towards any necessary improvements to the transport network arising as a direct result of the development proposal. The Circular states that in some circumstances on sites proposed for major development inadequately served by modes, other than the private car, to improve accessibility, the provision of contributions may be appropriate towards for example, new /improved rail / bus stations or facilities, park and ride schemes, improved bus services / shelters and other capital items, widening access, turning spaces, and improved measures for cyclists / pedestrians. Technical Advice Note (Wales) 18 Transport (1998) Annex B highlights the role contributions canplay specifically in relation to parking for example, where it is not possible or desirable to provide all non-operational car parking on site. In general planning obligations should be necessary, relevant to planning, directly related to the development, must be fairly and reasonably related in scale and kind to the proposed development and reasonable in all other respects.

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