7. Retailing

7.1.

INTRODUCTION

Penarth Town Centre
7.1.1.

Retailing is a major industry of great significance to national and local economies.The 1980's were a growth period for retailing as private sector investment responded to changes in social, economic and demographic forces to produce a large increase in shopping facilities. The pattern of retailing also altered dramatically. The number of working women has increased which has implications for local shopping facilities. Communications have also improved and personal mobility increased, with rising levels of car ownership. Consumer perceptions and habits have also inevitably changed. The local shops and district or town shopping areas no longer automatically attract local expenditure as 'bulk purchasing' and 'one-stop' shopping have developed. 

7.1.2.

The main changes reflected in the local shopping environment have been:

  • The expansion of Cardiff as a regional shopping centre for comparison goods;
  • The development of large convenience stores in edge of town locations;
  • The closure of small convenience goods stores within towns;
  • The growth of out-of-town retail warehousing; and
  • The development of an out of town retail centre at Culverhouse Cross through a succession of appeal decisions.
7.1.3.

Within the Vale, district centres such as Barry and Penarth have been affected by new competition and local comparison expenditure has leaked to Culverhouse Cross, Cardiff City Centre and other locations. The Council needs to ensure that the requirements of all sections of the community are met within this changing retail pattern as not everyone has access to new shopping developments, particularly those in out-of-centre locations. 

7.1.4.

The investment in existing town centres has also suffered in the face of significant ut-of-town retail development and the attractions of Cardiff City Centre. The improvement of the shopping environment of existing district centres, to make them more attractive to shoppers, is considered essential to maintain their important economic and social role. 

7.1.5.

Existing Retail Hierarchy

The Local Retail Hierarchy for the Vale of Glamorgan is defined as follows:

  1. Major Town Shopping Centre
    (Over 15,000 m2 of retail floor space)
    • Barry Town Centre 
  2. Established District Centres
    (Over 3,500 m2 but less than 15,000 m2 of retail floor space)
    • Penarth District Centre
    • Cowbridge District Centre
    • Llantwit Major District Centre
    • High Street / Broad Street, Barry
    • Upper Holton Road

  Holton Road, BarryLlantwit MajorNetto, Thompson Street, Barry

  1. Edge of Centre Developments
    (within easy walking distance of a centre not more than 200-300 meters from existing town centre)
    • Netto, Thompson Street, Barry
  2. Local Centres
    (with more than 10 retail outlets but of less than 3,500 m2)
    • Main Street, Cadoxton, Barry
    • Vere Street, Cadoxton, Barry
    • Park Crescent, Barry
    • Station Approach, Penarth
    • Dinas Powys Village
    • St. Athan
    • Barry Road, near Cadoxton, Barry
    • Cornerswell Road, Penarth
    • Rhoose
    • Cardiff Road, Dinas Powys
  3. Neighbourhood Centres
    (between 3 and 10 units)
    • Castle Court / The Parade, Dinas Powys
    • Boverton
    • Cwm Talwg Centre, Barry
    • Gibbonsdown Centre, Barry
    • Dochdwy Road, Llandough
    • Camms Corner, Dinas Powys
    • Tennyson Road, Penarth
    • Bron-y-Mor, Barry
    • Pill Street, Penarth
    • Crawshay Drive, Llantwit Major
    • Font-y-Gary
  4. Out of Centre Developments
    (in a location clearly separate from a town centre, but not necessarily outside the urban area)
    • Morrisons, Barry Waterfront
    • Waitrose, Cadoxton
    • Tesco, Penarth Marina
    • Tesco, Highlight Park, Barry
    • Kwik Save, Penarth Road

 Cowbridge Station Approach, PenarthWaitrose, Cadoxton

  1. Out of Town Developments
    (on a greenfield site or on land not clearly within the current urban boundary)
    • Culverhouse Cross
    • A Place for Homes, Llandow

In addition there are a number of scattered convenience stores (including village stores, corner shops and kiosks.)

7.1.6.

The Council has, since 1996 produced a detailed Retail Floorspace Survey on an annual basis which provides information on the types of shops at each location, their floorspace and details of all vacant units. The survey also incorporates vitality measures. 

7.1.7.

The established district centres provide for a significant amount of the population's convenience and durable goods needs. They also contain a choice of service units, banks, post offices and entertainment outlets in addition to their basic retailing facilities. Traditionally they are a focus for community life in the area. 

7.1.8.

Local and neighbourhood centres also have a social function as many of their stores open until late at night. However, many of the larger stores also perform the lower order functions for their immediate catchment population. 

7.1.9.

Superimposed to a limited degree on this traditional hierarchy are edge of centre, out of centre and out of town facilities:- car / caravan sales, garden centres, DIY (carpet, furniture and electrical warehouses) and food superstores. Within the Vale four large food stores have been constructed-two on the edge of Barry (Tesco, Highlight Park, 1982 m2 net and Waitrose, Palmerston Road, 2439 m2 net) and the Tesco Stores at Penarth Dock, 2897 m2 and Culverhouse Cross 4465 m2)  

7.1.10.

The Culverhouse Cross interchange near Wenvoe has been an area of considerable and continued pressure for retail development. In the early 1990's a 7109 m2 net Marks and Spencer Store opened next to the Tesco food superstore. A retail development of 6186 m2 net (7 units) more recently opened on the Vale Gate Business Park opposite. Planning consent was recently granted on appeal on land opposite Brooklands Terrace for two schemes incorporating retail and businesses uses. As these developments are only between five and seven miles from three of the main town / district shopping centres of the Vale, the growing retail floorspace in this locality is viewed with considerable concern by the Council. A major retail complex with the possible benefits of accessibility and comfort for the mobile sections of the public, competing with nearby centres at a time of retail recession is seen as a major challenge to the Council's retail objectives. 

7.1.11.

It is the Council's intention that retail proposals included within the Barry Waterfront development, by Associated British Ports, make an important contribution to urban regeneration and strengthen the retail role of Barry. Retail land values are typically higher than most other appropriate land use values and, therefore, are significant elements in urban regeneration programmes. 

7.1.12.

In May 1997, the Council granted an outline planning consent for the comprehensive redevelopment of 77 hectares of Barry No.1 Dock. The retail element of this development was conditioned to accommodate no more than 11,148 m2 gross of retail warehousing. Control of the scale and type of retailing is a vital factor in encouraging urban regeneration and contributing to the future rosperity of Barry town centre. The ready availability of a retail site for development within the town will assist in competing with pressures from out-oftown development and widening the range of shopping facilities in Barry. 

7.1.13.

Future Retailing Needs

Retailing expenditure calculations are notoriously difficult exercises with even small variations in assumptions as to trends providing a wide range of forecasts. A joint exercise was undertaken to assess the future level of retail expenditure in the former South Glamorgan area involving the former Cardiff City Council, Vale of Glamorgan Borough Council and Cardiff Bay Development Corporation. This suggests that the projected future growth in expenditure on comparison goods will
be insufficient to satisfy planned or proposed additional floorspace without taking trade from established centres or unless additional expenditure over that estimated is attracted to the former County area.

7.1.14.

In a projected situation of low-growth, it is important that existing district shopping centres are afforded a degree of protection in order to enable them to survive in an increasingly competitive retail market. At the same time it should be accepted that the retail environment will continue to be subject to change. Consequently, it will be necessary to ensure that the existing shopping hierarchy continues to meet the needs of  the local population. 

7.1.15.

Issues such as the future of stores below 2000m2 net retail floorspace in the food retailing hierarchy will need monitoring as will the capacity of district centres to accommodate large, new non-food floorspace. 

7.1.16.

There is a requirement to make the existing shopping centres more attractive. A great deal of money has already been invested, especially in Barry. Private investment has seen the modernisation of existing floorspace at Waitrose, Palmerston Road, and parts of Holton Road, e.g. the Dan Evans Department Store. Publicly funded environmental improvements, including partial pedestrianisation, have been undertaken in Holton Road by the former Borough and County Councils. Furthermore, Commercial Renewal Areas have been established in five shopping areas of Barry including the district centres of Holton Road and Broad Street / High Street, and the town centre of Penarth. Town centre managers have been appointed by the Council in Barry and Penarth to co-ordinate improvements and to help realise retail potential. 

7.1.17.

In 1988 retail consultants were employed by the former Borough Council, South Glamorgan County Council and the Welsh Development Agency to look at the future of Barry Town Centre. They recommended a strategy to stem the leak of consumer expenditure to Cardiff. 

7.1.18.

This leakage was estimated to be as high as 35 percent of local expenditure. If the leakage could be reduced, and attractive development secured, the Consultants suggested that as much as 12,541m2 gross of additional retail floorspace could be accommodated in or adjoining the town centre by 1996 (from a 1986 base). 

7.1.19.

In 1994, a further retail study confirmed that retention of comparison goods expenditure within Barry is poor with significant outflows to Cardiff and, increasingly, to Culverhouse Cross. The study concluded that there was a demand for representation by convenience goods discount retailers in the town centre and for up to 3716 m2 of new comparison good floorspace as part of a town centre edevelopment scheme. The study also concludes that retail warehousing at No.1 Dock, selling a complementary range of goods to the Centre, would not significantly affect the vitality, attractiveness and viability of Barry. 

7.1.20.

In view of recent developments, there would appear to be no need for additional large-scale retail development in the Vale outside Barry. However, since commercial competition as such is not a land use planning consideration, all such future retail proposals will need to be assessed in light of their effect on the existing retail hierarchy, the vitality, attractiveness and viability of existing shopping centres, and their impact on the urban regeneration policies of the Council. 

7.2.

NATIONAL PLANNING GUIDANCE

7.2.1.

Retailing policy is embodied in Planning Policy Wales 2002 and Planning Policy Wales Technical Advice Note (Wales) 4 Retailing and Town Centres 1996. 

7.2.2.

Planning Policy Wales (2002) states that Development Plans should provide a clear strategy for retail development and should provide sites for different retailing developments which minimise the need to travel. Alternative uses on sites allocated for retailing developments will not be allowed. 

7.2.3.

The Guidance promotes a “sequential test” to finding sites for retail development. The preferred location for new retail development will be in town and district centres. If no suitable town / district centre sites are available then developers should look for edge of town and local centre sites. As a last resort out of centre and out of town sites can be used for new retail development. However, any such sites should be in locations that are accessible by a choice of transport modes. The proposed retail development must also not undermine the vitality, attractiveness and viability of town and district centres. TAN 4 provides advice on what information will be useful to local planning authorities in assessing the vitality, attractiveness and viability of town centres. 

7.3.

OBJECTIVES

7.3.1.

The Vale can never be self contained in retailing terms because expenditure flows across administrative boundaries as people seek to satisfy their shopping needs. An inadequate local provision of retail facilities can create an inefficient retail system with restricted choice and high costs for residents and an outflow of retail expenditure to surrounding centres. An over provision of facilities however, could seriously affect the vitality, attractiveness and viability of established shopping centres as a whole both in qualitative and quantitative terms. This could lead to a reduction in the range and number of shops and lead to a general physical deterioration in existing centres. 

7.3.2.

The Council, whilst recognising changes in the retail industry, has to balance the needs for different forms of retailing when assessing future retail provision in the Council's area. It is considered that the following objectives are appropriate as a context for policies to guide the future pattern of shopping provision in the Vale:

  • To maintain the existing hierarchy of town/district shopping centres and the role of the town centres; 
  • To protect and enhance the vitality, attractiveness and viability of town/district shopping centres;
  • To encourage the provision of an adequate range of shops to satisfy the needs of the local population;
  • To control the development of large new stores and retail warehousing outside existing and proposed district shopping centres;
  • To assist the existing town/district shopping centres to compete with new out-of-town retail facilities;
  • To recognise and support the role of retailing in the regeneration of urban areas; and
  • To maximise the opportunity for shoppers and other town centre users to uses means of transport other than the car.
7.4.

POLICIES AND PROPOSALS

POLICY SHOP 1 - THE SHOPPING ENVIRONMENT OF DISTRICT CENTRES

WITHIN DISTRICT CENTRES PRIORITY WILL BE GIVEN TO MAINTAINING AND ENHANCING THE SHOPPING ENVIRONMENT BY THE IMPLEMENTATION, WHERE APPROPRIATE, OF SCHEMES OF TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT, ENVIRONMENTAL ENHANCEMENT AND FACADE IMPROVEMENTS. 

7.4.1.

Improvements to the efficiency of shopping centres also need to be complemented by improvements to the general environment in order to make the centres safer, and more attractive places in which to shop, work and invest. The reduction of conflicts between traffic and shopper can be achieved by traffic management schemes as has already occurred in Holton Road, Barry. 

7.4.2.

The appearance and condition of buildings are important considerations in upgrading the retail environment. The Council can provide financial assistance in the six Commercial Renewal Areas (CRAs) in Barry and Penarth. CRA grants can cover 50% of the cost of eligible works to improve the external appearance of properties. Supplementary Planning Guidance on shop front design will be produced to provide a framework for the improvement and alteration of existing buildings and the development of new buildings to ensure that proposals make a positive contribution to the street scene and relate well to adjoining properties. The Guidance will be applicable to all the shopping centres of the Vale. Policy ENV 27 outlines the criteria against which development proposals will be judged. 

7.4.3.

The co-operation of tenants and owners of properties is a vital ingredient in maintaining and enhancing the shopping environment. To assist in the generation and co-ordination of initiatives in Barry and Penarth, Town Centre Managers have been appointed with the overall responsibility for improving the attractions of Barry and Penarth as places to shop. 

7.4.4.

In the other district centres of the Vale, in addition to the development criteria of Policy ENV 27 the Council will liaise with appropriate authorities to ensure a continued improvement in the shopping scene. The introduction of landscape features and street furniture with a cohesive theme can assist in improving the environment along with traffic management schemes. 

7.4.5.

The old town of Llantwit Major is of great historical value but its shopping environment is poor due to narrow pavements and vehicular conflict. The Boverton Road shopping frontage, whilst having wider pavements, is unattractive considering it is the major retail centre of the town and the eastern gateway to the historic core. The retail area of Boverton could also benefit from small scale environmental improvements. Proposals for environmental improvements will be prepared in an effort to upgrade the shopping environments.

Boverton Road, Llantwit Major The Precinct off Boverton Road, Llantwit Major

7.4.6.

The Council can also serve notices under Section 215 of the Town and Country Planning Act 1990 (as amended) to require the proper maintenance of land and buildings where the amenity of the area is adversely affected. Section 79 of the Building Act 1984 provides powers to control the appearance of ruinous and dilapidated buildings or neglected sites. These measures can also be used to improve the quality of the environment in the shopping centres of the Vale.

POLICY SHOP 2 - NEW AND IMPROVED SHOPPING FACILITIES

NEW AND IMPROVED RETAILING FACILITIES WITHIN AND ADJOINING ESTABLISHED TOWN / DISTRICT SHOPPING CENTRES, AND IN THE AREA OF COMPREHENSIVE REDEVELOPMENT AT BARRY WATERFRONT, WILL BE PERMITTED IF THE PROPOSAL:

  1. HAS NO UNACCEPTABLE EFFECT ON THE AMENITY AND CHARACTER OF EXISTING OR NEIGHBOURING ENVIRONMENTS BY VIRTUE OF NOISE, TRAFFIC CONGESTION, EXACERBATION OF PARKING PROBLEMS OR VISUAL INTRUSION; 
  2. ENSURES THE HIGHWAY NETWORK IS CAPABLE OF ACCOMMODATING THE TRAFFIC GENERATED BY THE PROPOSAL WITHOUT AN UNACCEPTABLE EFFECT ON TRAFFIC FLOWS AND ROAD SAFETY;
  3. PROVIDES A HIGH STANDARD OF DESIGN AND MATERIALS;
  4. PROVIDES CAR PARKING AND SERVICING FACILITIES IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE COUNCIL'S APPROVED STANDARDS;
  5. ENSURES THAT ADEQUATE UTILITY SERVICES EXIST OR CAN BE READILY AND ECONOMICALLY PROVIDED; AND
  6. PROVIDES FOR ACCESS BY DISABLED PERSONS.
7.4.7.

The six established town / district centres of the Vale are important economic and social elements with considerable investment having been made in their infrastructure. The maintenance of the vitality, attractiveness and viability of these centres, and their environmental improvement are important aims of the Plan. In guiding new retail developments to existing shopping centres, it is necessary to indicate criteria against which proposals will be evaluated. 

7.4.8.

It is the intention of the Council to encourage and guide retail development into the district centres or Barry Waterfront and to consolidate retail activity in district centres within defined primary shopping cores (see Policy SHOP 5). The location of proposals within such core areas can assist in the development of more compact and attractive shopping centres. In such locations developments are accessible to all sections of the community and can help to renew and enhance the physical fabric of the centre. 

7.4.9.

The impact of retail proposals on the character of historic towns like Cowbridge and Llantwit Major as well as within Conservation Areas, will obviously be a major consideration in evaluating proposals. The scale and design of proposals will be strictly controlled to protect the local environment. In all shopping centres, however, a high standard of design and materials will be sought for new developments. Such controls are intended to contribute to improving the appearance of the Vale's shopping centres. In Barry and Penarth, the main shopping centres have been designated as Commercial Renewal Areas with grant aid available to assist in improving the external appearance of properties. 

7.4.10.

New developments should be accessible to all groups within the community including those with mobility difficulties. Most of the existing district shopping centres of the Vale are physically incapable of absorbing any major retail expansion with the exception of Barry Town Centre. It is therefore the intention of the Council to accommodate the majority of future retail needs of the Vale within Barry Town Centre or in those parts of Barry Waterfront close to the town centre (see Policy SHOP 4). 

7.4.11.

Criteria (ii) is designed to ensure that there is not an unacceptable increase in traffic flows, i.e. with demand exceeding the highway capacity, as a result of a new development. Although in some cases there may be a 'nil detriment' situation, i.e. there is not significant worsening of the present traffic situation, where a new development creates an unacceptable effect on traffic flows or raises road safety concerns, it will be important for the developer to enter into negotiation with the Council to resolve these issues (see para. 6.5.2).

7.4.12.

Sites (i) to (iii) are illustrated in Appendix 7. In addition, all allocations are marked on the Proposal Map. 

7.4.13.

The retention of an increasing share of future local retail expenditure within Barry could facilitate a modernisation of existing and new floorspace. The allocated sites are intended to absorb any future demand for retail floorspace that may be generated. 

7.4.14.

Site (i) is 1.2 hectares in total. It represents a major retail opportunity within the Town Centre. Development of the Town Hall site will complement the existing shopping centre. Detailed planning consent was granted for the comprehensive redevelopment of this site in July 1996. The proposals include a new supermarket, several new retail outlets and a new library.

Artist’s Impresssion of proposed Town Hall Development 

7.4.15.

Site (ii) consists of one single ownership block plus the site of the former Victoria Public House. The block 59 - 71 Holton Road is centrally located in the main retail area. It is in need of redevelopment to provide modern efficient retail floorspace. Upper floors could be used for office or residential use (see Policy SHOP 11). The site offers a major redevelopment opportunity. 

7.4.16.

Site (iii) is a strategically important site at an entrance to the shopping centre but is in need of refurbishment to complement the recent improvements undertaken at the corner properties on Holton Road. Suitable uses could be retailing at ground floor level with offices and / or residential above. 

7.4.17.

Site (iv) In May 1997, the Council granted an outline planning consent for the comprehensive redevelopment of 77 hectares of Barry No. 1 Dock. The retail element was conditioned to accommodate no more that 11,148m2 gross of retail warehousing. The Environment Agency has advised that the site will need to be protected to a minimum level of 8.3 metres above Ordnance datum. The development of this brownfield site is intended to be complementary to the role of the town centre. SHOP 4 provides a list of criteria against which proposals for retail warehousing in Barry Waterfront will be assessed.

POLICY SHOP 4 - RETAIL WAREHOUSING IN BARRY WATERFRONT

PROPOSALS FOR THE PROVISION OF RETAIL WAREHOUSING WITHIN THE COMPREHENSIVE REDEVELOPMENT OF BARRY WATERFRONT WILL BE PERMITTED IF THE PROPOSAL:

  1. IS LOCATED IN THE AREA OF LAND EAST OF THE GLADSTONE LINK ROAD AND SOUTH OF THE RAILWAY LINE;
  2. WILL NOT HAVE AN UNACCEPTABLE EFFECT ON THE VITALITY, VIABILITY AND ATTRACTIVENESS OF BARRY TOWN CENTRE;
  3. WILL NOT HAVE AN UNACCEPTABLE EFFECT ON TRAFFIC FLOWS, TRAFFIC PATTERNS, ENERGY USE AND VEHICLE EMISSIONS;
  4. IS WELL LOCATED TO PUBLIC TRANSPORT, THE NEEDS OF THE NON-CAR TRAVELLER AND THE MAIN ROAD NETWORK;
  5. PROVIDES CAR PARKING AND SERVICING FACILITIES IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE APPROVED COUNCIL GUIDELINES;
  6. PROVIDES ADEQUATE UTILITY SERVICES THAT CAN BE READILY AND ECONOMICALLY PROVIDED;
  7. INCORPORATES A HIGH STANDARD OF DESIGN; AND
  8. THE PROPOSAL DOES NOT HAVE AN UNACCEPTABLE EFFECT ON AREAS OF ECOLOGICAL, GEOLOGICAL, GEOMORPHOLOGICAL, WILDLIFE IMPORTANCE, LANDSCAPE PROTECTION OR ARCHAEOLOGICAL INTEREST.

View Map

7.4.18.

The proposed provision of retail warehousing in Barry Waterfront, can play an important role in bringing about the beneficial re-use of a reclaimed 'brownfield' site within an urban area which will result in positive environmental gain and new local employment opportunities. Retailing can be of vital significance in raising land values in an urban regeneration scheme and in justifying public and private sector investment in infrastructure required to “kick start” such schemes. Suitably located and controlled, the provision of retail warehousing within Barry Waterfront would make a significant contribution to the overall strategy of economic revival for Barry Town. Its development will be complementary to the role of the town centre rather than in direct competition.

Retail Park on the Waterfront, Barry 

POLICY SHOP 5 - GROUND FLOOR USES IN PRIMARY SHOPPING AREAS

AT GROUND FLOOR LEVEL IN PRIMARY SHOPPING AREAS OF THE TOWN / DISTRICT SHOPPING CENTRES, USES OTHER THAN THOSE WHICH FALL WITHIN CLASS A1 OF THE USE CLASSES ORDER 1987 (AS AMENDED) WILL ONLY BE PERMITTED WHERE THE PROPOSAL:

  1. WOULD NOT, BY VIRTUE OF ITS NATURE, DESIGN AND SCALE CREATE AN UNACCEPTABLE EFFECT ON THE CHARACTER OF THE PRIMARY SHOPPING FRONTAGE;
  2. WOULD NOT DOMINATE THE PRIMARY SHOPPING AREAS IN A WAY WHICH WOULD UNDERMINE THE RETAIL FUNCTION;
  3. WOULD NOT CREATE A DEAD WINDOW FRONTAGE;
  4. WOULD NOT GIVE RISE TO NEW, OR EXACERBATE EXISTING, LOCAL PROBLEMS RESULTING FROM TRAFFIC GENERATION, HIGHWAY SAFETY, NOISE, SMELL OR OTHER AMENITY CONSIDERATIONS; AND
  5. INCORPORATES A HIGH STANDARD OF DESIGN.
7.4.19.

The primary shopping areas are defined at Appendix 7 in Barry, Penarth, Cowbridge and Llantwit Major. 

7.4.20.

The vitality, attractiveness and viability of existing shopping centres can be weakened by the establishment of non-retail uses within their prime shopping frontage. These are at the commercial heart of the centres and are defined by more or less continuous retail or retail related ground floor uses, comprising properties with the highest commercial rental values. 

7.4.21.

The extent of these primary shopping frontages within district centres is defined at Appendix 7. Non-retail uses include financial and professional offices (Class A2), food and drink outlets (Class A3), offices (Class B1) and amusement arcades. Each of these uses contribute to the wide range of services expected by the public within centres. A proliferation of such uses can result in a less attractive shopping environment. In addition, uses such as cafes, restaurants, snack bars, whilst providing important facilities, can give rise to environmental nuisance such as litter and smells. Financial and professional offices can often operate effectively above ground floor level in town centres and so contribute to bringing vacant floorspace back into beneficial use (see Policy SHOP 11). 

7.4.22.

Outside the primary shopping frontages it is appropriate to allow a wider mix of uses. In these locations the Council will treat proposals on their merits having regard to scale, design, amenity and transportation considerations.

POLICY SHOP 6 - ABOVE GROUND FLOOR LEVEL IN PRIMARY SHOPPING AREAS

ABOVE GROUND FLOOR LEVEL WITHIN THE PRIMARY SHOPPING AREAS OF EACH OF THE DISTRICT SHOPPING CENTRES, DEVELOPMENTS WITHIN USE CLASSES *A2 AND *A3 AS DEFINED BY THE TOWN AND COUNTRY PLANNING USE CLASSES ORDER 1987 (AS AMENDED) WILL BE PERMITTED IF THE PROPOSAL:

  1. PROVIDES ACCESS AND PARKING ARRANGEMENTS IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE COUNCIL'S APPROVED GUIDELINES;
  2. INCORPORATES A HIGH STANDARD OF DESIGN;
  3. WOULD NOT GIVE RISE TO NEW, OR EXACERBATE EXISTING, LOCAL PROBLEMS RESULTING FROM TRAFFIC GENERATION, HIGHWAY SAFETY, NOISE, SMELL OR OTHER AMENITY CONSIDERATIONS; AND
  4. DOES NOT CREATE AN UNACCEPTABLE EFFECT ON THE AMENITIES OF ADJOINING OCCUPIERS OR THE GENERAL PUBLIC.

*A2 Financial & Professional Services,

*A3 Food & Drink as defined by the Town and Country Planning (Use Classes) Order 1987 (as amended)

7.4.23.

The primary shopping areas are defined at Appendix 7 in Barry, Penarth, Cowbridge and Llantwit Major. 

7.4.24.

Businesses such as offices, professional services, restaurants, cafes, wine bars etc., are ancillary to the main retailing function of the primary shopping areas but should not normally be allowed to displace them. They could however, with the exception of hot food takeaways within core shopping areas, be considered above ground floor level in the core areas or on the fringe of such areas. Some uses such as restaurants can been seen as complementary to retailing in that they carry out much of their business in the evening and therefore often do not compete for car parking space. There is ample scope to accommodate or even relocate such uses in order to strengthen the efficiency of the primary retail frontages. 

7.4.25.

Policy SHOP 11 also favours residential use in Holton Road above commercial premises. In the area of Holton Road between Greenwood Street and St. Mary's avenue the Council intends to apply Council planning standards flexibly to assist in bringing upper floors into beneficial use. 

7.4.26.

As residential areas are in close proximity to most of the Vale's shopping centres, amenity considerations are important. Adequate provision for the extraction of fumes and to control noise will be essential. 

7.4.27.

The improvement of the general appearance of its shopping areas is an important objective of the Council, and proposals within such areas will need to be well designed. 

7.4.28.

The emphasis of Council policy is to strengthen the retail core of the shopping centres, so the possibility exists of shops in fringe shopping areas becoming vacant. This has already occurred in areas such as Glebe Street, Penarth. The Council will support proposals to convert vacant shop units outside primary shopping areas to beneficial uses provided that there are no overriding planning objections and that they are well designed.

POLICY SHOP 7 - A2 AND A3 USES IN BARRY

DEVELOPMENTS WITHIN USE CLASSES A2 AND A3 AS DEFINED BY THE TOWN AND COUNTRY PLANNING USE CLASSES ORDER 1987 (AS AMENDED) WILL BE PERMITTED ON THE EAST SIDE OF THOMPSON STREET, BARRY BETWEEN NOS. 9 AND 25, AND IN HOLTON ROAD, BARRY WEST OF THOMPSON STREET IF THE PROPOSAL:

  1. PROVIDES PARKING AND SERVICING IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE COUNCIL'S APPROVED GUIDELINES; 
  2. HAS NO UNACCEPTABLE EFFECT ON THE AMENITIES OF DJOINING OCCUPIERS AND THE GENERAL PUBLIC;
  3. WOULD NOT GIVE RISE TO NEW, OR EXACERBATE EXISTING, LOCAL PROBLEMS ARISING FROM TRAFFIC GENERATION, HIGHWAY SAFETY, NOISE, SMELL OR OTHER AMENITY CONSIDERATIONS; AND
  4. INCORPORATES A HIGH STANDARD OF DESIGN.
7.4.29.

The shopping areas adjoining Barry's major retail core are potentially important gateways to the Town Centre though are themselves secondary in retail terms.

However, the proximity of the Civic Offices and Magistrates Court makes these sites suitable for office uses and such proposals, where suitable, will be encouraged. Similarly, food outlets would complement such office uses, widen the appeal of the centre and not compete for prime retail space.

POLICY SHOP 8 - TYNEWYDD ROAD, BARRY

PROPOSALS FOR THE CONVERSION OF PROPERTIES TO COMMERCIAL USE IN TYNEWYDD ROAD, BARRY, WILL ONLY BE PERMITTED SOUTH OF NO. 29 ON THE WEST SIDE OF THE ROAD. 

7.4.30.

In order to strengthen the retail core in Barry Town Centre and to safeguard the environment of Tynewydd Road it is necessary to prevent further commercial development in Tynewydd Road. The west side of Tynewydd Road up to No. 29 has been converted from residential use to commercial uses, with one exception. No extension north of No. 29 will be allowed. As only one conversion has taken place on the east side, the residential character is intact. No further conversion will be permitted there.

POLICY SHOP 9 - PROTECTION OF RETAIL USES

THE RETENTION OF CLASS A1* USES, AS DEFINED BY THE TOWN AND COUNTRY PLANNING USE CLASSES ORDER 1987 (AS AMENDED), IN LOCAL AND NEIGHBOURHOOD CENTRES WILL BE FAVOURED.

* A1 Shops as defined by the Town and Country Planning (Use Classes) Order 1987 (as amended). 

7.4.31.

Local and neighbourhood centres are defined at section 7.1. Such shopping facilities are considered to be important in serving the local population. Such retail uses should therefore be protected from the intrusion of offices and other non-retail users.

POLICY SHOP 10 - NEW TAKEAWAY OUTLETS

NEW TAKEAWAY FOOD OUTLETS (CLASS *A3 OF THE TOWN AND COUNTRY PLANNING USE CLASSES ORDER 1987 (AS AMENDED)) WILL BE PERMITTED IF THE PROPOSAL:

  1. DOES NOT HAVE AN UNACCEPTABLE EFFECT ON RESIDENTIAL AMENITIES BY VIRTUE OF GIVING RISE TO NEW OR EXACERBATE EXISTING LOCAL PROBLEMS RESULTING FROM TRAFFIC GENERATION, HIGHWAY SAFETY, NOISE, SMELL OR OTHER AMENITY CONSIDERATIONS;
  2. PROVIDES CAR PARKING AND SERVICING FACILITIES IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE COUNCIL'S APPROVED GUIDELINES; AND
  3. DOES NOT HAVE AN UNACCEPTABLE EFFECT ON ANY CONSERVATION AREA OR LISTED BUILDING.
*A3 Food and Drink as defined by the Town and Country Planning (Use Classes) Order 1987 (as amended)
7.4.32.

There is clearly a need for hot food outlets and restaurants, and town and district centres are often the most suitable locations. However, in view of the close proximity of residential areas to the retail centres of many of the Vale's shopping areas, disturbance may occur especially arising from the activities at hot food take away outlets. A high turnover of customers often occurs at unsociable hours. Where appropriate a suitable restriction of business hours will be imposed for new take-away outlets. Where proposals fail to satisfactorily meet the above criteria, permission will be refused. Proposals for other A3 uses will be considered on their individual merits.

POLICY SHOP 11 - UPPER FLOORS IN TOWN AND DISTRICT SHOPPING CENTRES

WITHIN TOWN AND DISTRICT SHOPPING CENTRES PROPOSALS FOR THE BENEFICIAL USE OF VACANT UPPER FLOORS OF COMMERCIAL PREMISES WILL BE PERMITTED IF THE PROPOSAL:

  1. HAS NO UNACCEPTABLE EFFECT ON NEIGHBOURING AMENITIES; 
  2. PROVIDES PARKING AND SERVICING IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE COUNCIL’S APPROVED GUIDELINES; AND
  3. INCORPORATES A HIGH STANDARD OF DESIGN.
IN RESPECT OF THE RESIDENTIAL USE OF UPPER FLOORS IN DISTRICT SHOPPING CENTRES THE COUNCIL WILL ADOPT A FLEXIBLE APPROACH IN ASSESSING THE NEED FOR AMENITY SPACE AND PARKING SPACES.
7.4.33.

Policy SHOP 5 indicated a presumption in favour of Class A2 and A3 use above ground level within primary shopping areas. Within Barry Town Centre this could bring into use under used or vacant space which is less attractive to retailers. General activity within the shopping area can be increased over the day and evening period by having uses such as offices, restaurants and also residential flats above ground floor level, provided that issues such as fume extraction, access, noise and car parking can be resolved. The use of the upper floors of premises will also encourage the improved maintenance of properties to the benefit of the external environment. 

7.4.34.

There may be difficulties, however, in meeting the guidelines currently used by the Council for the provision of amenity space and parking spaces. Rear gardens can be almost totally taken up by the commercial user at ground floor level. However, to encourage appropriate uses above ground level the Council will, after consideration of the nature of the use proposed, adopt a flexible approach in its assessment of the need for amenity and parking space for proposals above ground floor level in Holton Road within the area from St. Mary's Avenue to Greenwood Street. Consideration will include the proposed use of the property, the number of units proposed per property, the type and mix of accommodation proposed and its tenure. The scope for on site parking provision, and the availability of on street and public car parking facilities will also be considered. The Council has produced Supplementary Planning Guidance in respect of amenity standards. The potential to use appropriate legal agreements to influence occupancy may also be a relevant consideration.

POLICY SHOP 12 - NEW RETAIL DEVELOPMENT OUTSIDE DISTRICT SHOPPING CENTRES

PROPOSALS FOR NEW RETAIL DEVELOPMENT OUTSIDE EXISTING TOWN AND DISTRICT SHOPPING CENTRES WILL BE PERMITTED IF ALL OF THE FOLLOWING CRITERIA ARE MET:

  1. THE PROPOSAL EITHER SINGULARLY OR CUMULATIVELY WITH OTHER EXISTING OR APPROVED DEVELOPMENTS WILL NOT UNDERMINE THE VITALITY, ATTRACTIVENESS AND VIABILITY OF THE TOWN AND DISTRICT SHOPPING CENTRES OR THE RETAIL DEVELOPMENTS PROPOSED IN POLICY SHOP 3;
  2. THERE ARE NO SUITABLE TOWN, DISTRICT OR EDGE OF CENTRE SITES AND IN THE CASE OF OUT OF TOWN PROPOSALS, THERE ARE NO SUITABLE TOWN, DISTRICT, EDGE OF CENTRE OR OUT OF CENTRE SITES ('THE SEQUENTIAL TEST');
  3. THE PROPOSAL WILL NOT HAVE AN UNACCEPTABLE EFFECT ON THE ACHIEVEMENT OF AN ACCEPTABLE SUPPLY OF BUSINESS / INDUSTRIAL LAND AS IDENTIFIED IN POLICY EMP 1;
  4. THE PROPOSAL IS WELL LOCATED TO PUBLIC TRANSPORT, THE NEEDS OF THE NON-CAR TRAVELLER AND THE MAIN ROAD NETWORK;
  5. THE HIGHWAY NETWORK IS CAPABLE OF ACCOMMODATING THE TRAFFIC GENERATED BY THE PROPOSAL WITHOUT AN UNACCEPTABLE ADVERSE EFFECT ON TRAFFIC FLOWS AND PATTERNS, SAFETY, ENERGY USE OR OTHER EMISSIONS;
  6. CAR PARKING AND SERVICING FACILITIES ARE IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE COUNCIL'S APPROVED GUIDELINES;
  7. ADEQUATE UTILITY SERVICES EXIST, ARE REASONABLY ACCESSIBLE OR CAN BE READILY AND ECONOMICALLY PROVIDED; AND
  8. THE PROPOSAL DOES NOT RESULT IN THE LOSS OF GRADES 1, 2 OR 3A AGRICULTURAL LAND OR HAVE AN UNACCEPTABLE EFFECT ON AREAS OF ECOLOGICAL, GEOLOGICAL, GEOMORPHOLOGICAL, WILDLIFE IMPORTANCE, LANDSCAPE PROTECTION OR ARCHAEOLOGICAL INTEREST.
7.4.35.

The Council's retail strategy seeks to protect and develop the existing retail centres of the Vale and to use the high land values, that appropriate retail developments can create, to support urban regeneration initiatives. 

7.4.36.

This policy provides developers with certainty as to how any development proposals outside town centres will be addressed and is in line with the Government's “sequential” test for new retail development, as stated in paragraph 10.3.2 of Planning Policy Wales 2002. Developers should first look for suitable town centre sites where sites or buildings for conversion are available, then edge of centre sites, and finally out of centre sites in locations that are accessible by a choice of means of transport. Terminology for retail locations and types of centre is listed in section 7.1. 

7.4.37.

The policy criteria also seek to achieve sustainable developments which respect the need for environmental controls over development. 

7.4.38.

Retail proposals on employment land in the Vale will not be supported. In order to meet the employment objectives of the Council it is important that the supply of such land is protected (see Policy EMP 4). 

7.4.39.

Through its development control function the Council can influence the location and nature of commercial properties within the Vale for the general benefit of shoppers. 

7.5.

IMPLEMENTATION

7.5.1.

Through the provision of grant aid for external improvements for eligible properties within designated Commercial Renewal Areas, the Council is improving the shopping environment for the benefit of shoppers and retailers. Town Centre Forums have been established for Barry, Llantwit Major, Cowbridge and Penarth, which will help to co-ordinate proposals for improvement. Town Centre Managers have been appointed for Barry and Penarth with responsibility for bringing together the different agencies involved in providing services in order to improve the attractiveness and economic well-being of the centres. This initiative also provides expertise to assist the other main shopping centres in the Vale. 

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