8. Sport & Recreation

8.1.

INTRODUCTION

8.1.1.

Feeding the wildfowl at Cosmeton Recreation activities can be broadly divided into formal and informal recreation using both outdoor and indoor facilities. Formal recreation, such as team games, requires the use of specific facilities and locations, whilst informal recreation, such as enjoyment of the countryside, may be satisfied on a casual basis without either specialist facilities or skills.

8.1.2.

The provision of adequate and appropriate recreational facilities is of great importance in improving the quality of life of the Vale's residents and assisting the potential for tourism in the area. Recreational facilities, therefore, have a social and economic function.

8.1.3.

The Council will continue to be a major provider of leisure facilities but its future role may be constrained by increasing financial restrictions and a need to make public services more cost effective.

8.1.4.

There is considerable demand for development within the Vale and existing recreation sites may come under pressure for development. In considering the pressures for development the Council will need to ensure that sufficient land and other resources are allocated in the UDP for organised sport and informal recreation. The Council in the consideration of development proposals will take full account of community needs for recreation space, having regard to current levels of provision and deficiencies. The visual contribution of open space to the conservation of the natural and built heritage of an area, in addition to its amenity value, will also be taken into account.

8.2.

NATIONAL PLANNING GUIDANCE

8.2.1.

National planning guidance in respect of sport and recreation is contained in Chapter 11 of Planning Policy Wales 2002 and supplemented by Planning Policy Wales Technical Advice Note (Wales) 16 Sport and Recreation (1998).

8.2.2.

Planning Policy Wales 2002 states that sport and recreation opportunities should, wherever possible, be available for everyone, including elderly people and those with disabilities. The planning system should ensure that adequate land and water resources are allocated for both organised sport and for recreation, taking full account of the need for recreational space, and current levels of provision and deficiencies and the impact on the location.

8.2.3.

The guidance goes on to state that open spaces with significant recreational or amenity value should be protected from development particularly in urban areas. All playing fields should also be protected except where facilities can best be retained and enhanced through the redevelopment of a small part of the site, alternative provision of equivalent community benefit is made available after public consultation or there is an excess of such provision in the area.

8.3.

RECREATIONAL OBJECTIVES

8.3.1.

In order to provide a context for policies and proposals relating to recreation, the following objectives are put forward:

  • To seek to identify the existing deficiencies in recreational facilities to meet existing and anticipated demand throughout the Vale;
  • To provide or encourage where appropriate the provision in accessible locations of new sport and recreational opportunities for local residents;
  • To protect existing areas of open space and playing fields from inappropriate development;
  • To promote the wider use by the community of all existing and future recreational facilities both public and private;
  • To ensure that new housing development is adequately provided with recreation and leisure facilities appropriate to the scale of development; and
  • To improve opportunities for access and enjoyment of the countryside to a level compatible with the local ecological and landscape capacity of the area and the interests of those who live and derive their livelihood from the land.
8.4.

POLICIES AND PROPOSALS

POLICY REC 1 - PROTECTION OF EXISTING RECREATIONAL FACILITIES

DEVELOPMENT INVOLVING THE LOSS OF EXISTING RECREATIONAL FACILITIES, WHETHER IN PUBLIC OR PRIVATE OWNERSHIP, WILL BE PERMITTED IF:

  1. ALTERNATIVE PROVISION OF EQUIVALENT COMMUNITY BENEFIT IS MADE AVAILABLE OR 
  2. THERE IS AN EXCESS OF SUCH PROVISION IN THE AREA AND
  3. THE FACILITIES ARE NOT IMPORTANT TO THE CHARACTER OF A CONSERVATION AREA OR THE SETTING OF THE TOWN OR VILLAGE.
8.4.1.

Proposals involving the loss of recreational facilities will rarely be acceptable. This advice is echoed in Planning Policy Wales 2002. Circumstances may exist however where a recreational facility is redundant or requires relocation. In such circumstances, where replacement facilities can be provided and there is no reduction in the quality of provision, the Council may consider relaxing its policy against development. Proposed replacement playing fields, however, must be suitable for use in terms of levels and drainage particularly in areas where flat land is at a premium and must be easily accessible to the general public. Attention will also be paid to the existing and potential ecological and visual value of open space, especially the setting which it provides for adjoining development. The availability of open space in the locality will also be a consideration.

POLICY REC 2 - JOINT PROVISION AND DUAL USE OF FACILITIES

THE COUNCIL WILL FAVOUR PROPOSALS WHICH RESULT IN WIDER USE BY THE COMMUNITY OF EXISTING RECREATIONAL FACILITIES IN ORDER TO MEET THE RECREATIONAL NEEDS OF THE PLAN AREA.

8.4.2.

Currently, the Council's resources are limited. Some recreation facilities are not open to use by the general public, or are not used to their full capacity. Joint provision and management of facilities can be mutually beneficial. Likewise links with other Council facilities and “Cross Border” usage can be beneficial in reducing deficiencies in some areas. It has been estimated by the Sports Council for Wales that, in Wales a full programme of community use of sports halls would reduce unsatisfied demand from 42% to 2%.

8.4.3.

Policy REC 2 seeks to encourage the principles of joint provision and dual use of facilities both private and public. Education facilities in particular could make a significant contribution to meeting existing deficiencies in playing field and sports hall demand. Dual use of facilities has the advantages of avoiding duplication of expenditure and maximising the use of scarce resources.

8.4.4.

The Council recognises the difficulties that dual use of facilities produces in terms of over use and management. The benefits of such an approach however, are significant enough to justify the pursuit of the objective of dual use of existing and future facilities. In many rural settlements local demand for amenity space, kickabout areas or indoor facilities can only be met by the use of the village school. Similarly, the planned dual use of new recreation areas can benefit many of the older urban primary schools that do not possess their own playing fields.

POLICY REC 3 - PROVISION OF OPEN SPACE WITHIN NEW RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENTS

WITHIN RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT OPEN SPACE AT A STANDARD OF 2.43 HECTARES PER 1000 PROJECTED POPULATION WILL BE SOUGHT IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE COUNCIL'S APPROVED MINIMUM STANDARDS FOR OUTDOOR PLAYING SPACE. SUCH OPEN SPACE WILL BE SOUGHT IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE FOLLOWING GUIDELINES:

  • CHILDREN'S PLAYING SPACE - 0.6 - 0.8 HECTARES PER 1000 PROJECTED POPULATION 
  • OUTDOOR SPORT - 1.6 - 1.8 HECTARES PER 1000 PROJECTED POPULATION

IN ASSESSING THE REQUIREMENTS OF INDIVIDUAL DEVELOPMENTS THE OPEN SPACE SOUGHT WILL BE ASSESSED IN THE LIGHT OF EXISTING PROVISION IN THE LOCALITY.

8.4.5.

Recreation facilities can also be provided by the private sector. Developers will be encouraged to make appropriate provision in new housing developments to satisfy the demands of that development. The above standards are based on the National Playing Fields Association standards which have been adopted by the Council.

8.4.6.

The location and quality of the existing open space in a locality will provide the basis for any assessment of provision required in new developments. The anticipated population profile of the new development may also influence open space requirements.

8.4.7.

In certain circumstances where application of the Council's standards is impractical (e.g. the site is too small to provide a meaningful area of open space) or where existing open space provision is deficient in quality in the immediate locality, the Council may be prepared to negotiate alternative arrangements i.e. off site contribution payments. In all cases the Council will be guided by the evidence of need and the opportunities available to satisfy that need in the locality.

8.4.8.

In all negotiations with developers the Council will satisfy itself that the open space benefits sought are reasonably related to the development and that the need for them arises from the development.

8.4.9.

Cliff Top Walk, looking from Penarth towards Lavernock Open space layout of developments, including amenity open space (which can provide for passive recreational  needs), should be designed in such a way as to exploit site topography, create open views and avoid incidental areas of open space. The location of proposed open spaces should also relate to existing open spaces and footpath links.

POLICY REC 4 - PROVISION FOR THE DISABLED AND ELDERLY

RECREATION PROPOSALS WHICH INCLUDE PROVISION FOR THE NEEDS OF THE DISABLED AND ELDERLY WILL BE FAVOURED.

8.4.10.

The needs of minority groups must not be overlooked. Such groups include those with disabilities, the elderly and those without access to private transport. Adaptation of existing facilities and the careful location and design of new facilities can assist in making them more available to all sections of the community and is in accordance with the requirements of the Disability Discrimination Act 1995. The need for special play provision for children with disabilities is also recognised by the Council.

POLICY REC 5 - NEW PLAYING FIELD PROVISION

LAND IS ALLOCATED IN THE FOLLOWING LOCATIONS FOR THE PROVISION OF PLAYING FIELDS:

DINAS POWYS:
(i) Caerleon Road (1.3 Hectares)
SULLY:
(ii) Glebelands (8.5 Hectares)
WENVOE:
(iii) Extension to Station Road (1.5 Hectares)
RHOOSE:
(iv) Rhoose Point Redevelopment (One playing pitch exact - hectarage to be agreed)
8.4.11.

Playing fields is the generic term for the space required for a number of organised recreation activities such as football, rugby, cricket etc. In considering the existing provision of playing fields within the Vale, the analysis follows the practice of the NPFA by including private facilities that are available to the public by "practice and policy". Unfortunately, public access to educational facilities and private facilities, which includes the voluntary, industrial and commercial sectors, can vary considerably. Private facilities have been included in the assessment of provision. School playing fields have also been included in the analysis as all pitches play a part in satisfying need regardless of their ownership. Table 1 opposite indicates existing and future requirements for playing fields in the Vale using the NPFA's minimum standard of 1.62 hectares per 1000 population for outdoor sport which has been adopted by the Council.

Table 1: Playing Field Requirements By Sector 

Location
Population
Hectares NPFA Standard
Existing actively used provision*
School playing field provision
Deficit
Barry46,810
75.8
34.8 (2.0p)
6.33
34.67
East Vale
36,640
59.4
39.5 (9.0)
2.44
17.46
Cowbridge
6,080
9.8
4.6 (1.6)
2.87
2.33
Llantwit Major
10,040
16.3
10.6 (0)
1.08
4.62
Rural Vale
19,630
31.8
19.3 (2.8)
1.33
11.17
*Aggregate of both public and private (private in brackets)
8.4.12.

The existing large shortfall of playing field provision is clearly illustrated in Table 1, with existing provision needing to be significantly increased to meet the NPFA standards for outdoor sport. The urban areas of the Vale are in most urgent need of additional provision if the Council's adopted standards are to be met. Suitable land is, however, in short supply in these areas and can be expensive to provide. Synthetic sports pitches can help to relieve pressure on traditional surfaces. Floodlighting of facilities can also increase the effective use of existing resources. The above analysis, however, reinforces the need to protect existing playing fields and justifies where possible, the dual use of educational playing fields.

8.4.13.

Policy REC 5 in allocating land for playing fields will go some way towards reducing the deficit, although an under provision will remain in many areas. The Council will continue to seek hitherto unidentified sites throughout the Vale during the Plan period in order to further remedy the deficit in playing field requirements.

POLICY REC 6 - CHILDREN'S PLAYING FACILITIES

CHILDREN'S PLAY FACILITIES WILL BE PROVIDED IN THE FOLLOWING IDENTIFIED AREAS OF NEED:

BARRY, PENARTH, BONVILSTON, COWBRIDGE, LLANDOW, ST NICHOLAS, ST MARY CHURCH, WICK, SOUTHERNDOWN AND ST BRIDES MAJOR; AND

IN NEW DEVELOPMENT AT A STANDARD OF 0.2 - 0.3 HECTARES PER 1000 PROJECTED POPULATION. (THIS PROVISION FALLING WITHIN THE REQUIREMENTS FOR CHILDREN'S PLAYING SPACE 0.6 - 0.8 HECTARES PER 1000 PROJECTED POPULATION AS SET OUT IN POLICY REC 3.)

8.4.14.

Children are less mobile than adults and often require supervision. They therefore require a range of facilities nearer to home including play spaces for younger children and kickabout areas for older children.

8.4.15.

In the past the NPFA recommended that play spaces be provided at distances not more than 400 metres from the dwellings they serve with smaller play spaces provided nearer home for children of pre-school age. "Walking time" rather than distance is now prescribed by the NPFA as the best gauge of access to facilities. Five minutes walking time is estimated to correspond to 400 metres along a pedestrian route and fifteen minutes to 1000 metres. The Council's adopted open space standards so far as they relate to the provision of children's play areas is 0.6 - 0.8 hectares per 1000 population, (see Policy REC 3) and the Council would ideally wish to achieve this. However, the existing deficiencies in the pattern of provision of children's play equipment cannot always be remedied by the provision of new facilities because of the absence of suitable available land. The above policy, however, aims to assist in improving deficiencies in the existing pattern of play facilities.

8.4.16.

Essentially, the term “children's play facilities” refers to children's outdoor play equipment e.g. adventure playgrounds. However, the term “children's play space” mentioned in Policy REC 3 has a much broader meaning and includes not only children's play facilities but also other designated facilities for children which offer specific opportunity for outdoor play space such as casual or informal space within housing areas.

8.4.17.

The provision of play spaces within the above named settlements will help to satisfy a current deficiency in the provision of play areas and meet expected future demand over the period of the Plan. Where there is a requirement for children's play areas within new developments, developers will be required to provide the facilities for such areas by entering into appropriate legal agreements with the Council.

POLICY REC 7 - SPORT AND LEISURE FACILITIES

PROPOSALS FOR NEW SPORT AND LEISURE FACILITIES OUTSIDE EXISTING TOWN AND DISTRICT CENTRES WILL BE PERMITTED IF ALL OF THE FOLLOWING CRITERIA ARE MET:

  1. THE PROPOSALS EITHER SINGULARLY OR CUMULATIVELY WITH OTHER EXISTING OR APPROVED DEVELOPMENTS DOES NOT UNDERMINE THE VITALITY, VIABILITY AND ATTRACTIVENESS OF TOWN OR DISTRICT CENTRES OR PROPOSED DEVELOPMENTS AT BARRY WATERFRONT;
  2. THERE ARE NO SUITABLE TOWN, DISTRICT OR EDGE OF CENTRE SITES AND IN THE CASE OF OUT OF TOWN / DISTRICT PROPOSALS, THERE ARE NO SUITABLE TOWN, DISTRICT, EDGE OF CENTRE OR OUT OF CENTRE SITES (THE SEQUENTIAL TEST);
  3. THE PROPOSAL DOES NOT HAVE AN UNACCEPTABLE EFFECT ON THE ACHIEVEMENT OF AN ACCEPTABLE SUPPLY OF BUSINESS / INDUSTRIAL LAND AS IDENTIFIED IN POLICY EMP 1;
  4. THE PROPOSAL IS WELL LOCATED TO PUBLIC TRANSPORT, THE NEEDS OF THE NON CAR TRAVELLER AND THE MAIN ROAD NETWORK;
  5. THE HIGHWAY NETWORK IS CAPABLE OF ACCOMMODATING THE TRAFFIC GENERATED BY THE PROPOSAL WITHOUT AN UNACCEPTABLE EFFECT ON TRAFFIC FLOWS AND PATTERNS, SAFETY, ENERGY USE OR OTHER EMISSIONS;
  6. THE PROPOSAL MEETS THE COUNCIL'S APPROVED PARKING GUIDELINES;
  7. ADEQUATE UTILITY SERVICES EXIST, ARE REASONABLY ACCESSIBLE OR CAN BE READILY AND ECONOMICALLY PROVIDED;
  8. THE PROPOSAL DOES NOT RESULT IN THE LOSS OF GRADES 1, 2 OR 3A AGRICULTURAL LAND OR HAVE AN UNACCEPTABLE EFFECT ON AREAS OF ARCHAEOLOGICAL, ECOLOGICAL OR WILDLIFE IMPORTANCE OR LANDSCAPE PROTECTION;
  9. THE PROPOSAL HAS NO UNACCEPTABLE EFFECT ON THE AMENITY AND CHARACTER OF EXISTING OR NEIGHBOURING ENVIRONMENTS BY VIRTUE OF NOISE, TRAFFIC CONGESTION, EXACERBATION OF PARKING PROBLEMS OR VISUAL INTRUSION.
8.4.18.

Most sport and leisure facilities are best located at Barry, Penarth, Llantwit Major and Cowbridge. Located here such developments are close to the population which they serve thereby reducing the need to travel.

Gym at Penarth Leisure Centre Weights machines, Barry Leisure Centre

Cardiovascular machines, Cowbridge Leisure Centre Fitball classes

8.4.19.

The Barry Waterfront redevelopment will also provide opportunities for leisure and sport developments during the Plan period. There are also leisure and sport opportunities within the redevelopment of Cardiff Bay which immediately adjoins the Council's area and is close to the areas of Dinas Powys and Penarth.

8.4.20.

It is also recognised that there are some recreational activities that are appropriate and in harmony with the countryside and the Council will seek to balance and reconcile the conflicting demands made on these areas. Account will need to be taken of the nature of any activity proposed, the ability of the land to sustain the proposal in the long term and the management techniques used to control it. Built development, however, can intrude into the countryside and depending on its exact location may result in the concentration of non-sustainable activities, such as increasing the amount of car borne trips. Policy ENV 1 governs development in the countryside. Policies ENV 5 and 6 deal with development proposals which fall within the Glamorgan Heritage Coast and the Coastal Zone.

8.4.21.

Most sport and leisure facilities are best located at Barry, Penarth, Llantwit Major and Cowbridge. Located here such developments are close to the population which they serve thereby reducing the need to travel. The Barry Waterfront redevelopment will also provide opportunities for leisure and sport developments during the Plan period. There are also leisure and sport opportunities within the redevelopment of Cardiff Bay which immediately adjoins the Council's area and is close to the areas of Dinas Powys and Penarth. It is also recognised that there are some recreational activities that are appropriate and in harmony with the countryside and the Council will seek to balance and reconcile the conflicting demands made on these areas. Account will need to betaken of the nature of any activity proposed, the ability of the land to sustain the proposal in the long term and the management techniques used to control it. Built development, however, can intrude into the countryside and depending on its exact location may result in the concentration of non-sustainable activities, such as increasing the amount of car borne trips. Policy ENV 1 governs development in the countryside. Policies ENV 5 and 6 deal with development proposals which fall within the Glamorgan Heritage Coast and the Coastal Zone. In applying the sequential approach, developers will need to be flexible about the scale, format, design of the development and the amount of car parking and these must be appropriate to local circumstances. Rather than propose developments with a mixture of large scale sport and leisure uses and a large amount of car parking which can only be accommodated in 'out of centre', or 'out of town' locations, developers must demonstrate why they could not develop elements of the larger scheme on sites in more central locations i.e. town or district centres, with less 'on site' car parking.

8.4.22.

In terms of the impact on vitality, viability and attractiveness of town and district centres, proposals will be especially considered in terms of their impact on the evening economy.

POLICY REC 8 - GOLF COURSES AND GOLF DRIVING RANGES

PROPOSALS FOR GOLF COURSES AND GOLF DRIVING RANGES WILL BE PERMITTED IF ALL OF THE FOLOWING CRITERIA ARE MET:

  1. THE PROPOSAL RESPECTS THE INDIGENOUS LANDSCAPE PATTERN; 
  2. THE PROPOSAL DOES NOT ADVERSELY AFFECT THE QUALITY OF THE BEST AND MOST VERSATILE AGRICULTURAL LAND (GRADES 1, 2 AND 3A);
  3. THE PROPOSAL DOES NOT UNACCEPTABLY AFFECT THE ARCHAEOLOGICAL, ECOLOGICAL, GEOLOGICAL AND GEOMORPHOLOGICAL VALUE OF THE AREA;
  4. THE PROPOSAL DOES NOT HAVE AN UNACCEPTABLE EFFECT ON THE CHARACTER OR AMENITY OF NEIGHBOURING AREAS;
  5. THE TRAFFIC GENERATED BY THE PROPOSED USE CAN BE ACCOMMODATED BY THE ADJOINING ROAD NETWORK IN BOTH PHYSICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL TERMS;
  6. BUILDING DEVELOPMENT IS RESTRICTED TO THOSE FACILITIES ESSENTIAL TO SERVE THE GOLF COURSE, NAMELY, CLUBHOUSE INCLUDING CHANGING ROOMS,OFFICES, REFRESHMENT FACILITIES AND ASSOCIATED MAINTENANCE BUILDINGS. THE SCALE AND DESIGN OF SUCH FACILITIES SHALL PAY REGARD TO THE LOCATION OF THE SITE AND IT WILL BE NECESSARY TO ENSURE THAT ADEQUATE SERVICES CAN BE PROVIDED WITHOUT DETRIMENT TO THE ENVIRONMENT;
  7. THE PROPOSAL DOES NOT HAVE AN UNACCEPTABLE EFFECT ON PUBLIC RIGHTS OF WAY AND SHALL, WHEREVER POSSIBLE, PROVIDE OPPORTUNITIES FOR ENHANCING PUBLIC ACCESS.

PROPOSALS FOR THE ILLUMINATION OF GOLF FACILITIES WILL BE PERMITTED WHERE THERE IS NO UNACCEPTABLE EFFECT UPON THE ENVIRONMENTAL CHARACTER OF THE SITE, ECOLOGY AND RESIDENTIAL AMENITY.

8.4.23.

Cottrell Park Golf Course The Sports Council for Wales have indicated that a further 1.1 18 hole golf courses are required in the Vale of Glamorgan to meet demand which is generally concentrated in the Barry area. Proposals for new and enlarged golf facilities must be able to be successfully integrated with the character of the countryside. For this reason topographic alterations should be minimised and substantial buildings will be unacceptable, as they would appear as intrusive features in the landscape. Such development would undermine local and national objectives of maintaining the appearance of the countryside for its own sake. Golf courses often require extensive remodelling of the landform and the provision of additional planting as well as the loss of existing indigenous hedgerows and trees. Applications for golf facilities must therefore demonstrate that the proposals can harmonise with the locality. The Council will require extensive details to be submitted with each application. Applications should include full details of the following items:

  1. course layout and topographical and landscape analysis;
  2. siting and size of all buildings and car parking;
  3. a management plan in terms of landscape proposals both short term and long term;
  4. an ecological impact statement;
  5. access details; and
  6. service provision, including water supply.
8.4.24.

In appropriate cases, the Council will also require applications to be accompanied by an archaeological impact statement or formal Environmental Impact Assessment.

8.4.25.

The use of potable water supplies for irrigating golf courses is wasteful and can lead to adverse effects on supplies. Other than the provision of purely domestic supplies to buildings, all irrigation water will be required to come from private extraction, not the public distribution system. Developers will be required to demonstrate that the proposed use of private water supplies will not adverselyimpact upon existing areas of conservation interest, water features and other users dependant upon either surface waters or ground water resources. Appropriate conditions will be imposed on any planning consent or through a legal agreement.

8.4.26.

In assessing applications for golf related development, regard will be had to the Supplementary Planning Guidance produced by the Council on Golf Related Development. The Council will also make use of legal agreements to secure its objectives. If necessary, planning conditions will be used to restrict the period of implementation of any permission granted, in order to control uncertainty in the uptake of permissions.

POLICY REC 9 - NEW GOLF RELATED DEVELOPMENTS

NEW GOLF RELATED DEVELOPMENTS WILL BE PERMITTED PROVIDING THEY ARE NOT LOCATED WITHIN THE GLAMORGAN HERITAGE COAST AND THEY DO NOT HAVE AN UNACCEPTABLE EFFECT ON:

  1. SITES OF SCIENTIFIC INTEREST;
  2. DESIGNATED NATURE CONSERVATION SITES;
  3. PARKS, GARDENS AND LANDSCAPES OF HISTORIC IMPORTANCE; AND
  4. DESIGNATED CONSERVATION AREAS AND / OR LISTED BUILDINGS.
8.4.27.

The particular physical and landscape requirements of golf proposals will generally be alien to the special characteristics of the Heritage Coast and SSSI's within the Vale. Consequently, it is considered that such development cannot be successfully integrated into such areas. The above policy is intended to reinforce the general protection given to the Heritage Coast by the environmental policies of the Plan. (See also Policy ENV 5.)

8.4.28.

The plateau type landscape of the Heritage Coast, in addition to making development intrusive in a sensitive landscape, is not easily accessed.

8.4.29.

The policy does not, however, preclude small SSSI's from being combined into a golf course proposal, e.g. where it can be demonstrated that added protection can be obtained for the SSSI from a secluded location within the golf course (see also Policies ENV 13, 14 and 15).

POLICY REC 10 - DEVELOPMENT OF ALLOTMENT LAND

THE DEVELOPMENT OF LAND USED FOR ALLOTMENTS WILL BE PERMITTED IF SUITABLE AND ACCESSIBLE REPLACEMENT SITES ARE PROVIDED BY THE DEVELOPER.

8.4.30.

There is no evidence of excess demand within the Vale that would suggest a need for additional allotment spaces. Indeed waiting lists have fallen in recent years. The allotments at Boverton Court, Llantwit Major may eventually need relocation because of road improvements. Elsewhere, under - utilisation is a factor in some allotments.

8.4.31.

In recent years new allotments have been provided at St. Cyres Field, Penarth and north of Cemetery Road, Barry.

8.4.32.

Whilst it is the view of the Council that a new allocation of land for allotments is not required, a need exists to protect existing sites.

POLICY REC 11 - INFORMAL PUBLIC OPEN SPACE AND COUNTRY PARKS

LAND IS ALLOCATED FOR INFORMAL PUBLIC OPEN SPACE AT:

  1. PENCOEDTRE, BARRY;
  2. WHITE FARM, MERTHYR DYFAN, BARRY;
  3. SOUTH OF ST. ILLTYDS CHURCH, LLANTWIT MAJOR;
  4. PLYMOUTH PARK, PENARTH; AND
  5. RHOOSE POINT;

AND FOR COUNTRY PARK EXTENSIONS AT:

  1. PORTHKERRY, BARRY; AND
  2. COSMESTON, PENARTH.
8.4.33.

Informal facilities required for leisure purposes range from small sitting out areas, public rights of way and picnic sites to large urban and country parks. The Council currently provides a number of such facilities.

8.4.34.

Porthkerry Park In the rural areas the Council provides facilities to allow both visitors and residents the opportunity to enjoy the attractive countryside of the Vale. Two country parks are located at Porthkerry, Barry and at Cosmeston Lakes, Penarth. The latter also contains a reconstructed Medieval Village. The recreational areas within the Glamorgan Heritage Coast are complemented by picnic sites andfootpath routes along the coast between Sully and Penarth. Other agencies such as the ForestryCommission, also provide informal recreation facilities whilst the countryside and its villages in general and the Thaw and Ely River valleys in particular are attractive to visitors.

8.4.35.

The needs of informal activities in the countryside are relatively simple being mainly car parks, lay-bys and picnic areas. These easy access arrangements and a system of public rights of way maximise the available recreation opportunities in the countryside.

8.4.36.

In order to improve the existing provision of informal public open space in urban areas the above areas are allocated.

8.4.37.

The allocation of approximately 4 hectares of informal open space at the comprehensive redevelopment at Pencoedtre (north east Barry) will provide a much needed facility for the 820 new houses to be built there during the Plan period.

8.4.38.

The allocations at White Farm, Merthyr Dyfan, Barry and Llantwit Major both have the advantage of maintaining a green lung within the heart of urban development. White Farm, Barry is also allocated for a residential use (HOUS 1 (19) refers) and the whole site extends to some 12 hectares. The site was originally designated in the Adopted Barry Local Plan (1983) and The Vale of Glamorgan Local Plan, Deposit Draft (as amended) 1995 for informal open space. However, a certificate of appropriate alternative development for residential purposes was granted on the majority of the site in June 1994. The Council is seeking to negotiate with the owner, an outcome whereby in exchange for residential use on part of the site, the remainder is enhanced in visual and nature conservation terms and transferred to the Council for retention as public open space. It is not known at this stage what proportion of the site will be for recreational purposes.

8.4.39.

Improvements to the landscape in the open space along the Ogney Brook will improve visual amenities in the area of Llantwit Major, south of St. Illtyds Church.

8.4.40.

The proposed park in Penarth lies within the Cardiff Bay Development Corporation's area at a site within the former Penarth Dock.

8.4.41.

The provision of informal open space at Rhoose Point will be part of the comprehensive redevelopment of this former quarry (see also HOUS 1 (13)). The signed section 106 agreement includes the provision of a public 'pay as you play' golf course, finance for changing facilities, a nature conservation area and informal open space.

8.4.42.

The extensions to the two country parks at Porthkerry and Cosmeston were both negotiated as a result of housing allocations at Cwm Barri (HOUS 1 (5)) and Cogan Hall Farm (HOUS 1 (8)).

POLICY REC 12 - PUBLIC RIGHTS OF WAY AND RECREATIONAL ROUTES

DURING THE PLAN PERIOD, THE COUNCIL WILL MAINTAIN AND IMPROVE THE EXISTING PATTERN OF PUBLIC RIGHTS OF WAY (INCLUDING BRIDLEWAYS). LAND WILL BE PROTECTED AND PROVISION MADE FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE FOLLOWING ROUTES AS A FRAMEWORK FOR A NETWORK OF LINKAGES FOR THE ENJOYMENT OF THE COUNTRYSIDE.

  1. ALONG THE OGNEY BROOK, LLANTWIT MAJOR;
  2. ALONG THE HODDNANT, LLANTWIT MAJOR;
  3. EXTENSION OF THE PENARTH RAILWAY WALK SOUTH WEST TOWARDS SULLY, INCLUDING THE PROVISION OF A CYCLE ROUTE;
  4. COMPLETION OF A TOWN TRAIL IN BARRY;
  5. DEVELOPMENT OF THE DISUSED RAILWAY LINE BETWEEN ABERTHAW / COWBRIDGE / PONTYCLUN INCLUDING THE PROVISION OF A CYCLE ROUTE;
  6. IMPROVEMENT OF ACCESS TO THE COAST AT LAVERNOCK POINT, ST MARY'S WELL BAY, SWANBRIDGE, SULLY, RHOOSE POINT, PLEASANT HARBOUR AND SUMMERHOUSEPOINT;
  7. DEVELOPMENT OF A SEASCAPE TRAIL LINKING EXISTING FOOTPATHS TO PROVIDE AN UNBROKEN RIGHT OF WAY FROM THE OGMORE RIVER TO CARDIFF BAY;
  8. CREATION OF NEW ACCESS OPPORTUNITIES AS PART OF DEVELOPMENT PROPOSALS;
  9. DEVELOPMENT OF A FOOTPATH AROUND PENARTH HEAD, INCLUDING THE PROVISION OF A CYCLE PATH; AND
  10. FROM THE CARDIFF BAY BARRAGE THROUGH PENARTH HAVEN AND ADJACENT TO THE RAILWAY LINE, AND ALSO ADJACENT TO THE RIVER ELY.

WHERE APPROPRIATE THE COUNCIL WILL FAVOUR THE INCORPORATION INTO THESE ROUTES OF BRIDLEWAYS, CYCLEWAYS AND FACILITIES FOR USERS.

8.4.43.

The Countryside Council for Wales regards the rights of way network as the single most important means by which the public can enjoy the countryside. However, the present pattern of rights of way reflects historical patterns of circulation. Some, therefore, are often poorly related to modern requirements for movement or are neglected.

8.4.44.

Public Access to the countryside The improvement of existing routes and the development of new routes for nature trails, circular walks, etc. is therefore, an important consideration in enhancing public access to the countryside. The increasing popularity of horse riding can be catered for by specially designed bridleways whilstthe disused railway lines within the area also provide recreational opportunities for use as bridleways, cycleways and footpaths.

8.4.45.

Given the legal status of the rights of way network it is the intention of the Council to improve the recreational potential of rights of way by giving priority to those routes relevant to present day recreational needs and identifying new routes. In particular priority will be given to routes between residential areas and recreational facilities, and circular routes from countryside attractions readily accessible by car and public transport (e.g. country parks). The legal status of all public rights of way will continue to be protected for the future by all means available to the Council.

8.4.46.

It is the intention of the Council to maintain and improve the existing pattern of public rights of way (in consultation with Community Councils and with the assistance of groups such as Valeways) by all means available to it. The Council will also ensure that land is protected and provision made for the establishment and development of recreation routes. Any improvements will attempt to minimise conflict with agricultural use and conservation interests. Equally, it will be necessary to ensure that landowners are aware of and discharge their legal obligations in respect of the footpath network. The potential for the provision of spine routes, off which circular routes can radiate, will also be investigated as part of any improvements. It will also be important to ensure that any impact on existing rights of way due to proposed developments and planned highway construction is fully considered. These routes will not be open to motorised transport. Measures will be provided to ensure that disabled persons can enjoy the routes.

8.4.47.

The provision of these footpaths would assist in improving the links between residential areas and recreational facilities, besides being important recreational facilities in themselves. The link between urban areas and coast would be enhanced by the improvement of the existing footpath system in Llanwit Major. In the south east Vale the completion of the proposed footpath spine route linkingPenarth and Sully would facilitate linking access routes to the coast. The completion of the Barry “Town Trail” would link the major green spaces in north and west Barry to the recreational facilities of Barry Island and provide the basis of a comprehensive recreational footpath network for the whole of Barry. The proposed “Seascape Trail” is aimed at linking the existing Glamorgan Heritage Coast Path to the Seawall path at Rumney and Peterstone (within Cardiff County and Newport County Borough Councils areas) thereby serving an unbroken right of way along the whole of the Vale's coastline. In identifying a route between Jackson's Bay and the Bendricks due cognisance will be given to the operational needs of ABP. A route will only be agreed after full consultation with ABP.

8.4.48.

Appropriate landscaping of proposed footpaths will be necessary to ensure protection of the amenities of any adjoining residential properties. In the case of certain proposed footpath developments it will be beneficial to incorporate car parking facilities, e.g. coastal paths in the Barry - Penarth area. The more popular rights of way may require maintenance agreements to ensure that their continued popularity is not undermined by over use or the absence of control.

8.4.49.

Safe Routes to Schools Cycle path across Old Penarthians Recreation Ground, Penarth The Aberthaw to Pontyclun proposed recreation route is not a right of way. The Council's approved Cycling Strategy and SUSTRANS have identified the disused railway line as a potential feeder route for cyclists and walkers into the cross South Wales section of the National Cycle Network. However, the disused railway line is now owned by a number of different landowners. Clearly it will be important for the Council to enter into negotiations with landowners to address their concerns and to illustrate the potential benefits of a link to the National Cycle Network. It is intended that wherever possible the route will follow the line of the disused railway, although it is recognised that local diversions may be necessary due to local circumstances. The primary limitation for future implementation of cycle routes will be the availability of funding. As funding for cycling schemes is likely to be limited, the promotion, improvement and implementation of existing and new cycling schemes within the Vale of Glamorgan will largely be dependent upon seeking provision within other larger projects or initiatives. The Council feels that the routes identifiedpresent realistic opportunities for the future development and the securing of funding, when considered in the context of the National Cycle Network and the Penarth Headland Link. The Council will continue to seek improvements for cyclists and horse riders when opportunities arise e.g. through the Council's Safe Routes to Schools Schemes and in association with the development of the Vale of Glamorgan Line. The Council has powers under the Highways Act 1980 and the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 to create or reclassify public rights of way. Any request for the reclassification or dedication of routes for bridle or cycle traffic will be considered against the criteria set out in these Acts. 

POLICY REC 13 - SAILING

THE UPGRADING AND IMPROVEMENT OF EXISTING SAILING FACILITIES WILL BE FAVOURED. PROPOSALS FOR NEW SAILING FACILITIES WILL BE PERMITTED IF THERE IS NO UNACCEPTABLE EFFECT ON THE COUNTRYSIDE, THE GLAMORGAN HERITAGE COAST, THE COASTAL ZONE AND WATER RESOURCES AND THE RESIDENTIAL AMENITY OF EXISTING OR NEIGHBOURING ENVIRONMENTS BY VIRTUE OF NOISE OR VISUAL INTRUSION.

8.4.50.

Sailing is a popular recreational activity in the Vale of Glamorgan with yacht clubs at Barry and Penarth and sailing clubs at Sully and Cosmeston Lakes Country Park.

Penarth Esplanade looking down towards the sailing club 

8.4.51.

This policy relates to two types of sailing - yacht and dinghy sailing which both have land and water requirement.

8.4.52.

Yachting is concerned with larger sailing vessels which are usually kept on the water during the sailing season and stored over the winter months. Yachting requires moorings with safe anchorage, car parking spaces and maintenance and yacht storage facilities.

8.4.53.

Dinghy sailing requires an accessible sailing area (usually via a slipway or pontoon) which is often an enclosed water area. As with yachting, car parking spaces are required (for trailers as well) and storage facilities.

8.4.54.

Proposals for new sailing facilities must not have an unacceptable effect on the Glamorgan Heritage Coast, the Coastal Zone, water resources or the countryside. All proposals must therefore conform with Policies ENV 5, 6 and 7 in the Environment section of the Plan.

8.4.55.

Formal Recreation (indoor)

INDOOR SPORTS FACILITIES

The provision of multi-facility sports centres has greatly increased people's awareness of the opportunities that exist to participate in sports of all kinds. The increased provision of sports halls and swimming pools, including where both facilities are combined in large sports centres has been a major sporting development in recent decades.

8.4.56.

Within the Vale two large sports centres, with pools are provided at Barry and Penarth. Sports halls have been provided at Holm View, Barry and Cowbridge, whilst a leisure centre with pool has been developed as a joint facility at Llantwit Major Comprehensive School. In total 4 pools, each with a minimum dimension of 25 x 8.48 metres exist in the Vale, including Fontygary Park, Rhoose.

Small pool, Barry Leisure Centre 

8.4.57.

The last review of sports facilities undertaken by the Sports Council for Wales (Building for the Future: An Analysis of Sports Facility Provision in Wales 1997) found that the Vale of Glamorgan is relatively well provided for in terms of most types of sporting facility. With regard to unmet demand for indoor bowling rinks, athletics tracks and swimming pools, the figures for the Vale are well below the national average. Consequently, the model suggests there is no need for additional facilities in the authority. Unmet demand for sports halls, artificial turf pitches (ATP's) and golf courses, on the other hand, appears to indicate a need for additional facilities.

8.4.58.

The Facilities Planning Model used by the Sports Council for Wales suggests that the Vale of Glamorgan requires an additional 2.8, 4-court sports halls to satisfy unmet demand. The analysis by a 5km grid square reveals that Barry has the greatest level of need for additional facilities. Although unmet demand in Barry itself equates to only 0.86 of a 4-court hall, the accumulation of unmet demand to the west of the town (St Athan / Aberthaw / Rhoose) suggests that a new 4 to 6-courtsport hall might be a viable option. Any remaining unmet demand in this area could then be used via the opening of optimum use facilities (e.g. schools, colleges etc.) to the public at evenings and weekends.

8.4.59.

The unmet demand in the Dinas Powys / Llandough / Penarth area equates to half a 4-court hall (0.53 units). This area already has a 6-court sports hall at Penarth Leisure Centre so the creation of a small 2-court facility would probably not be viable. The opening of optimum use facilities would, again, be the best way of reducing unmet demand in this area.

8.4.60.

An analysis of the unmet demand for ATP's by 5km grid squares reveals that the highest unmet demand is located in the Barry area, the second highest in the Llantwit Major / Boverton area, and other smaller pockets of demand in Dinas Powys / Llandough / Penarth area and the St Athan / Aberthaw / Fontygary / Rhoose area. Although the model suggests that no one 5km grid square in the Vale has sufficient unmet demand to merit a new ATP, the concentration of unmet demand in the Barry area makes this the ideal location for such a facility.

8.4.61.

The demand for squash facilities seems to have steadied in recent years. On the per capita standard of 1 court / 7000 population the existing provision of public and private courts would appear to satisfy the estimated need of 16 courts.

8.4.62.

Facilities can be accommodated in multipurpose sports halls or in purpose built tennis centres. As a regional centre is now located in Cardiff Bay, it is unlikely that such a facility will be provided in the Vale and local demand will continue to be catered for within existing sports centres.

8.4.63.

The demand for additional indoor bowling facilities has been recognised by the Council. A private indoor facility has been developed at Sully which has met the majority of this demand.

8.5.

IMPLEMENTATION

8.5.1.

The provision of recreational facilities is influenced by many agencies. The Council through its development control functions can seek to influence the provision and location of open space and recreational land within and adjoining new developments. Likewise, the Council through its Regeneration, Tourism and Leisure Cabinet Advisory Committee will, subject to available finance, seek to provide new recreational facilities in areas of need.

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