11. Community & Utility Services

11.1.

INTRODUCTION

Newly re-furbished Penarth library
11.1.1.

There are a range of basic facilities essential for the well being of any community. These comprise Social Services, Education, Health, Telecommunications and Library facilities. The other essential major utilities are electricity, gas, water and sewage.

11.1.2.

The strategic objectives of the Plan attempt to ensure close liaison and early consultation with the major utilities companies in order to ensure that service provision throughout the Vale of Glamorgan is of the highest possible standard. The Council is aware, however, that the provision of some services can have an adverse effect upon the environment. Whilst recognising that it may have no powers to control the operations of statutory undertakers, the Council will seek to minimise the environmental effect of providing such services e.g. by requiring the laying of underground cables in areas designated for their landscape and/or townscape importance.

11.2.

NATIONAL PLANNING GUIDANCE

11.2.1.

National Planning Guidance in respect of renewable energy is contained within Chapter 12 of Planning Policy Wales 2002, supplemented by Planning Policy Wales Technical Advice Note (Wales) 8: Planning for Renewable Energy (2005). Planning Policy Wales states that Local Planning Authorities should include detailed policies in development plans for developing sources and should identify broad locations, or specific sites, suitable for various types of renewable energy installation. Local authorities are advised to consider the contribution that their area can make to meeting future energy needs on a local, regional and national basis and to consider the impact of renewable energy projects on the local environment as well as their wider contribution in reducing emission of greenhouse gas. TAN 8 highlights the environmental implications and seeks to promote the use of renewable energy technologies.

11.2.2.

Planning Policy Wales 2002 provides national guidance on utility services. This guidance advises Local Planning Authorities that in the preparation of plans, they should take account of the capacity of existing infrastructure including services such as education and health facilities, roads, water supply and sewers, electricity, gas and telecommunications and the need for additional facilities. Local Planning Authorities are also advised that they should consider both the siting requirementsof the utilities to enable them to meet demands that will be placed upon them, and the environmental effects of such additional uses. Development may need to be phased to allow time to ensure that the provision of utilities can be managed in a way consistent with general policies for the environment.

11.2.3.

Guidance contained within Chapter 12 of Planning Policy Wales 2002 recognises the importance of the growth of the communications services and the implications that network expansion will have on the development of land. The planning system should not be seen to hinder development in this field. However, Government guidance stresses that the environment should not be allowed to suffer damage in the process of community and utility services development.

11.3.

OBJECTIVES

11.3.1.

In order to provide a context for policies and proposals relating to recreation, the following objectives are put forward:

  • To ensure that community and utility services are provided at the highest possible standards to serve the needs of the present and future populations of the Vale of Glamorgan;
  • To encourage the use of renewable energy services; and
  • To ensure that utility provision is based upon sensitive locational choices and that proposals have a minimum impact on the environment.
11.4.

POLICIES & PROPOSALS

11.4.1.

Community Services

SOCIAL SERVICES

Responsibility for the provision of social services currently lie with the Vale of Glamorgan Council. The Council's strategic policies for the Vale of Glamorgan are contained within the Social Care Plan and the Children's Service Plan. The following services are currently available or are planned:

11.4.2.

CHILD PROTECTION AND FAMILY SUPPORT SERVICES

A family centre has been established in the former Maes y Coed school building. The centre provides a wide range of family services through partnerships to be developed with voluntary organisations. A joint project with Llandaff Diocese has also been implemented to provide family services in the Rural Vale. The project is based in Llantwit Major with the aim of co-ordinating various groups in the Rural Vale to ensure they have access to the services offered by the Statutory Agencies and Voluntary Organisations.

11.4.3.

SERVICES FOR ELDERLY PEOPLE

The Rondel Resource Centre for the Elderly is located at Maes y Cwm Street, Barry. Additional day care provision is available at the Penarth Gardenhurst Resource Centre for Elderly People on Holmsdale Place. Further day care provision is available in the west Vale, though its location and service provider are currently being reviewed.

11.4.4.

HEALTH

South Glamorgan Health Authority together with the Family Health Services Authority has produced a Strategic Purchasing Plan for 1994/95 to 2003/04 that outlines proposals for the provision of health care services for the people of the Vale of Glamorgan for the period up to 2004. The plan proposes that Llandough Hospital will be retained a developed, Sully Hospital may close and patients transferred to Llandough and the Barry Hospital.

Sully Hospital 

11.4.5.

Although the plan has not allocated land for the future development of health services, the Council shall liase closely with the Health Authority over future plans. The location of any new hospitals, surgery facilities and extensions to existing facilities will require that considerable attention is paid to the details of the design, the setting, landscaping and access.

POLICY COMM 1 - LLANDOUGH HOSPITAL

LAND IS RESERVED FOR THE FUTURE DEVELOPMENT AND EXPANSION OF LLANDOUGH HOSPITAL FOR HOSPITAL RELATED USES.

View Map 

11.4.6.

Llandough Hospital Land is allocated so that the future expansion of Llandough Hospital is not hindered. The proposed land is in a prominent position, so any hospital development on this site must be carefully designed and landscaped. It is considered that any further expansion of the hospital would require improvements to the existing accesses and/or the construction of a new access from the south.

POLICY COMM 2 - REUSE AND REDEVELOPMENT OF REDUNDANT HOSPITALS

PROPOSALS FOR THE REUSE AND REDEVELOPMENT OF REDUNDANT HOSPITALS WILL BE PERMITTED IF ALL OF THE FOLLOWING CRITERIA ARE MET:

  1. THE PROPOSAL DOES NOT UNACCEPTABLY EFFECT THE LOCAL ENVIRONMENT OR CHARACTER OF THE AREA;
  2. THE PROVISION OF CAR PARKING, SERVICING AND AMENITY SPACE IS IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE COUNCIL'S APPROVED GUIDELINES;
  3. ACCESS ARRANGEMENTS ARE TO THE COUNCIL'S SATISFACTION;
  4. THE PROPOSAL DOES NOT INVOLVE ANY SIGNIFICANT EXTENSION TO THE EXISTING BUILDINGS;
  5. IN THE CASE OF A LISTED BUILDING THE PROPOSAL DOES NOT UNACCEPTABLY AFFECT ITS CHARACTER AS A BUILDING OF SPECIAL ARCHITECTURAL OR HISTORIC INTEREST.

IN APPROPRIATE CASES, DEVELOPMENT PROPOSALS FOR SUCH SITES WILL BE GUIDED BY THE PREPARATION OF A DEVELOPMENT BRIEF.

11.4.7.

It is envisaged that during the plan period Hensol, like Sully Hospital, will cease to be used for health purposes. The Council recognises that these existing hospitals are suitable for redevelopment and reuse including prestigious employment uses such as research and development, conference facilities / hotel or educational / recreational use. A piecemeal approach to development will not be permitted. Proposals for the development of land within the curtilage of these hospitals will be considered in accordance with Policies ENV 1 and ENV 6 of the Plan.

Hensol Castle 

11.4.8.

Should an application for redevelopment be received by the Council for either listed hospital, it will be considered having regard to the requirements of the UDP's environmental policies relating to listed buildings.

11.4.9.

EDUCATION

With limited exceptions statutory responsibility for education currently lies with the Council as the Local Education Authority. Currently the demand for new primary schools is derived from the assumption that for every new private dwelling built there is and educational demand of approximately 0.2-0.25 children (figures for the local authority/housing associations are slightly higher). However, the open enrolment policy introduced by Central Government means that every parent will have the option to send their child to any state school providing there is the capacity. This may affect future decisions on where to locate schools and place some existing schools under pressure for expansion.

11.4.10.

In order to ensure that the future development of schools in areas of projected demand is not hindered the following are identified:

POLICY COMM 3 - PROVISION OF SCHOOLS

LAND IS RESERVED FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF SCHOOLS AT:

  1. NORTHEAST BARRY (1.2 HECTARES);
  2. COGAN HALL FARM (0.95 HECTARES); AND
  3. THE WATERFRONT, BARRY (1 HECTARE).
11.4.11.

Policy HOUS 1 identifies three major areas for residential development at North east Barry, Cogan Hall Farm, Penarth and Rhoose. As part of the comprehensive development of two of these sites (North east Barry and Cogan Hall Farm) the Council has requested that land be reserved for primary schools. Exact locations will be identified in the development briefs that will be drawn up for the sites.

11.4.12.

The Council is of the opinion that development at Rhoose Point can be served by an extension to the existing Rhws Primary School. The provision in Rhoose will be kept under review. In terms of secondary school provision, the Council does not envisage problems in satisfying any new demand within existing schools.

POLICY COMM 4 - THE REUSE AND REDEVELOPMENT OF BARRY COLLEGE ANNEX

PROPOSALS FOR THE REUSE AND REDEVELOPMENT OF BARRY COLLEGE ANNEX WILL BE PERMITTED IF ALL OF THE FOLLOWING CRITERIA ARE MET:

  1. THE PROPOSAL DOES NOT UNACCEPTABLY AFFECT THE LOCAL ENVIRONMENT OR SURROUNDING COUNTRYSIDE;
  2. THE PROPOSAL DOES NOT INVOLVE ANY EXTENSION TO THE EXISTING BUILDINGS;
  3. PROPOSALS FOR THE REPLACEMENT OF THE EXISTING TIMBER FRAMED BUILDINGS DO NOT RESULT IN A SIGNIFICANT INCREASE IN THE ORIGINAL VOLUME OF THE BUILDINGS;
  4. ANY PROPOSALS FOR EMPLOYMENT USE FALL WITHIN BUSINESS CLASS *B1;
  5. THE PROVISION OF CAR PARKING, SERVICING AND AMENITY SPACE IS IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE APPROVED GUIDELINES;
  6. HIGHWAY AND PEDESTRIAN ACCESS ARE IMPROVED TO THE APPROPRIATE STANDARD;
  7. THE SITE IS TO BE LANDSCAPED IN ACCORDANCE WITH AN APPROVED PLAN.

DEVELOPMENT PROPOSALS FOR THE SITE WILL BE GUIDED BY THE PREPARATION OF A DEVELOPMENT BRIEF.

*B1 use - Business as defined by the Town and Country Planning (Use Classes) Order 1987, as amended.

11.4.13.

It is envisaged that during the Plan period the Annex of Barry College, which is located off Five Mile Lane, will cease to be required by the current owners for educational purposes. The College Annex is situated in the attractive Waycock Valley. The existing campus comprises a number of early 20th Century buildings which were part of the isolation hospital which originally occupied the site, four timber framed buildings erected for educational purposes and a caretakers dwelling.

11.4.14.

The Council recognises that the existing campus buildings are suitable for sensitive redevelopment and reuse for other uses which are compatible with the countryside location. These could include B1 employment use under the terms of Policy EMP 2, hotel / non residential tourism uses under the terms of Policy TOUR 1, TOUR 4 and TOUR 5, educational purposes, medical facilities, community use, horsiculture under the terms of Policy ENV 9 and sports and recreation under the terms of Policy REC 7. In the Council's opinion reuse and redevelopment of the site for residential purposes is inappropriate and contrary to policies contained in the Environment and Housing chapters of the Plan.

11.4.15.

The Council accepts that reconstruction of the existing timber framed buildings may be necessary. However, this should be undertaken in a sensitive manner ensuring that replacement structures occupy the same footprint. Whilst reconstruction of the existing timber framed buildings will be permitted the Council will seek to ensure that no other additional construction takes place within the campus.

11.4.16.

In order to ensure continued highway safety along Five Mile Lane the Council will require improvements to the existing vehicular / pedestrian access. These improvements will require the upgrading of the existing vehicular access and the creation of safe public footpath linkages. All vehicular and pedestrian access improvements must be undertaken in a manner that respects the sensitivity of the location.

11.4.17.

In order to protect the attractive setting of the Waycock Valley a piecemeal approach to development will not be permitted. Proposals for the development of land within the curtilage of the campus will be considered in accordance with Policy ENV 1 of the Plan.

11.4.18.

LIBRARY PROVISION

The Vale of Glamorgan Council has responsibility for library services, and currently in the Vale there are five full time libraries. These are located at Barry, Penarth, Cowbridge, Dinas Powys and Llantwit Major. Of these full time facilities, the one which is considered to be inadequate for current and future needs is Barry, located in the former Municipal Buildings at King Square. It is envisaged that a new library facility will be accommodated in the redevelopment of King Square, Barry during the Plan period.

IT classes, Llantwit Major library Storytime in Barry library

Artist’s impression of proposed new Barry library 

11.4.19.

COMMUNITY HALLS

There are some 100 community halls within the Council's area. Most of these halls are owned and controlled by churches, with the Council owning and managing approximately 20%. In rural areas, the availability of local facilities is an important factor in maintaining the quality of life for residents. In practice, whilst locational considerations are important, it is equally important to ensure that the building is capable of fulfilling a range of functions useful to local people. In urban areas there tends to be a large number of community halls with consequent overlap between catchment areas.

11.4.20.

In 1992, the former Borough Council considered the future requirements for community facilities through the Vale, and a survey was undertaken of the existing levels of provision. The general conclusion was that all parts of the Vale had adequate coverage. New facilities may be required where overlapping catchment areas suggest the need for rationalisation or where existing facilities are in poor condition or are unsuitable for the requirements of the local community.

POLICY COMM 5 - RETENTION OF COMMUNITY FACILITIES

THE RETENTION OF COMMUNITY FACILITIES IN RURAL SETTLEMENTS AND VILLAGES WILL BE FAVOURED.

11.4.21.

For the purposes of this Policy community facilities are defined as services which seek to primarily meet the needs of the rural communities. Facilities such as Village Shops, Post Offices, Churches, Community Halls and Public Houses provide an important service in rural areas and help engender a sense of community.

11.4.22.

Development proposals for the conversion of existing community facilities to alternative uses will be assessed in the light of all material considerations including the availability and accessibility of alternative services. Proposals for the conversion of retail uses in local and neighbourhood centres to alternative uses will be assessed in conjunction with Policy SHOP 9.

11.4.23.

Utility Services

The Council will seek to minimise the effects of the provision of utility services on the environment through consultation with statutory undertakers. In particular, new utility services in conservation areas, areas of attractive landscape and sites of wildlife importance should where feasible be placed underground or diverted so as to minimise their impact. Where services are placed underground, adequate measures should be taken to restore the land to harmonise with its surroundings. Where services are placed underground sites of nature conservation interest and archaeological importance should be avoided. The Council wished to encourage the rationalisation of service provision so as to reduce adverse impact.

11.4.24.

ELECTRICITY

The National Grid Company plc (NGC) operate and maintain a network of high voltage powerlines (275kv and above) that enables the transmission of electricity. NGC currently has several lines connecting with the power station at Aberthaw. In light of the high cost and other associated difficulties it is acknowledged by the Council that the undergrounding of high voltage powerlines will only be carried out in appropriate circumstances.

11.4.25.

SWALEC has confirmed that a new grid substation will be required to service the north east Barry and Cogan Hall Farm housing development areas for which a site will need to be identified.

11.4.26.

The proposed housing development at Rhoose identified in Policy HOUS 1 will be supplied from the East Aberthaw Grid Sub Station. This, however, is an interim measure, and any new development may require the construction of a new 132kvsub station in the area. The actual timing of the new grid sub station will depend on the development in and around the village of Rhoose and Cardiff International Airport.

11.4.27.

SWALEC will require reinforcement of the electricity distribution system during the Plan period, and will include a new 132kv circuit to link Cardiff Bay via Sully, Barry and Penarth with Aberthaw.

11.4.28.

GAS

British Gas have confirmed that they do not anticipate any problems in making a gas supply available to the proposed residential developments at north east Barry, Cogan Hall Farm and Rhoose. Any application for gas supply will, however, need to satisfy the current marketing and financial criteria associated with new supplies.

11.4.29.

Water

In instances where water mains traverse development sites, works intended to protect the integrity of the water mains must be undertaken. Where the integrity of the water main cannot be protected, in may be necessary for the line of the watermain to be diverted. Where development land is located on the fringe of settlements, extensions to the existing water mains may be required to service the site. Dwr Cymru- Welsh Water require that the cost of all works associated with the protection, extension and diversion of water mains with development sites be borne by the developer.

11.4.30.

Dwr Cymru - Welsh Water have confirmed that the proposed housing development at Cogan Hall Farm will require the provision of a new off-site main, to be provided at the developer's expense. The development at north east Barry will need to take account of the present water main which will affect the layout of the site. The site will be adequately served by a main situated on its northern boundary.

11.4.31.

Dwr Cymru - Welsh Water have indicated that there are currently some constraints to supplying the development at Rhoose. Whilst there has been a recently constructed mains extension in the vicinity of Cardiff International Airport (to meet immediate demands) there remains a restriction in the distribution system in the Weycock Cross area. This is subject to further investigation with a view to the necessary capital improvements being promoted to facilitate all of the development identified at Rhoose in the Plan. Any further major water supplies would be subject to special arrangements and the developer would be required to contribute towards the cost.

11.4.32.

PUBLIC SEWAGE TREATMENT/TRUNK SEWERS

Dwr Cymru - Welsh Water currently provide sewage treatment throughout the Vale of Glamorgan. In accordance with the requirements of the Green Seas Initiative and the Urban Waste Treatment Directive, Dwr Cymru is implementing a number of projects aimed at improving discharges and bringing about improvements in the Coastal waters along the Vale of Glamorgan. The current and future provision for Public Sewage treatment/trunk sewers in the Vale is as follows;

11.4.33.

East Vale
Dwr Cymru- Welsh Water have recently initiated improvements in the Wenvoe treatment works. These improvements necessitated the closure of the treatment works and installation of a new pumping station. It is Dwr Cymru- Welsh Water's intention that all sewage treatment demands in the east Vale will be served by the recently constructed sewage treatment works located at Cog Moors.

11.4.34.

Dwr Cymru - Welsh Water are presently implementing a £48 million scheme aimed at improving the bathing waters around Barry together with the recreational waters around Barry together with the recreational waters around Lavernock and Penarth. The scheme when fully operational will comply with the European Community Urban Waste Directive (91/271/EEC) and will bring an end to the discharge of raw sewage into coastal waters of the east Vale.

11.4.35.

Rural Vale
As a result of a scheme funded jointly by Dwr Cymru- Welsh Water and the former Borough Council, the villages of Ystradowen, Maendy and Trehyngyll were connected to the main sewage lines in 1994. The sewage from these villages and proposed new housing developments in Aberthin and Ystradowen will discharge into the treatment works at Llanblethian.

11.4.36.

West Vale
The requirements of new housing developments with the western Vale has necessitated the construction of a new sewage treatment complex, to be located west of Llantwit Major. The proposed complex will include a pumping station and sewage treatment works and is scheduled for completion by the end of 1998.

11.4.37.

The various proposed developments identified in the UDP may well necessitate improvements to the existing public sewage system and it is expected that developers will either utilise the requisition procedure for the provision of facilities by Dwr Cymru - Welsh Water or carry out the necessary improvements as part of each development.

11.4.38.

Where the existing foul sewerage system cannot serve new developments, improvements to the system must be carried out prior to the development becoming operational. However, where connection to the mains is not feasible, consideration may be given to the use of private sewage treatment facilities provided that ground conditions are satisfactory and the plot of land is of sufficient size for an adequate sub soil drainage system. Small private sewage treatment plants within sewered areas will not be considered to be acceptable.

11.4.39.

TELECOMMUNICATIONS

Modern communications are an essential and beneficial element in the life of the local and national community. The provision of new communications technology and the maintenance of the established network entail the physical development of land and have implications for the control of development.

11.4.40.

Mobile phone mast near Llandow Government policy seeks to facilitate the growth of telecommunications, including cellular radio and cable television, together with new forms of broadcasting. Planning Policy Wales 2002 recognises the need for access to modern, high speed telecommunications services throughout Wales and the provision of sites for such installations, whilst taking full account of the effect upon the environmental amenity of neighbouring areas. The Guidance also specifies that when considering telecommunications development proposals, local planning authorities should take account of thelimitations imposed by the nature of the network and the technology. The Guidance requires that local planning authorities identify criteria intended to guide telecommunications developments in order to minimise the impact on amenity consistent with operational requirements. In light of these aims the following policy is put forward:

POLICY COMM 6 - TELECOMMUNICATION

THE DEVELOPMENT OF TELECOMMUNICATION SYSTEMS BY TELECOMMUNICATIONS OPERATORS WILL BE PERMITTED IF:

  1. THERE ARE NO SUITABLE EXISTING FACILITIES SUCH AS EXISTING RADIO MASTS AND TOWERS OR EXISTING BUILDINGS THAT CAN BE UTILISED;
  2. SUFFICIENT MEASURES ARE TAKEN TO MINIMISE THE VISUAL IMPACT OF THE DEVELOPMENT SUCH AS SITING TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF TREE SCREENING, INCORPORATION OFAPPROPRIATE LANDSCAPING AND APPROPRIATE COLOURING OF APPARATUS INCLUDING MASTS AND ANTENNAS; AND
  3. THE DEVELOPMENT DOES NOT HAVE AN UNACCEPTABLE EFFECT ON THE INTERESTS OF AGRICULTURE, CONSERVATION, AREAS OF ECOLOGICAL INTEREST, ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITES, WILDLIFE AND LANDSCAPE IMPORTANCE, OR ON FEATURES OF GEOLOGICAL ORGEOMORPHOLOGICAL IMPORTANCE.
11.4.41.

The Council recognises the importance of modern telecommunication installations in both a social and commercial context. Owing to the potentially obtrusive nature of telecommunication installations, it is important that the demands of telecommunication companies are balanced with the needs of the surrounding environment. The Council welcomes early discussion with British Telecommunications Limited together with other operators over their proposals and future service provision.

11.4.42.

With regard to major housing allocations (Policy HOUS 1) British Telecom does not anticipate any problems in providing a service to the housing developments proposed at north east Barry, Cogan Hall Farm and Rhoose although they will require an early indication of the size of the developments.

11.4.43.

RENEWABLE ENERGY

The potential for developing renewable energy resources within the Vale must be looked at in conjunction with policies to protect the natural and urban environment. Any proposals for renewable energy within the Vale must not adversely affect the countryside of the Vale of Glamorgan, the coastline or the setting of any of the Conservation Areas.

11.4.44.

It is not considered that there are any sites that are suited to wind power development within the Vale of Glamorgan.

POLICY COMM 7 - WIND GENERATORS AND FARMS

PROPOSALS FOR INDIVIDUAL WIND GENERATORS AND WIND FARMS WILL BE PERMITTED IF:

  1. THE PROPOSAL HAS NO UNACCEPTABLE EFFECT UPON THE LANDSCAPE, PARTICULARLY WHEN VIEWED FROM PUBLIC ROADS, PUBLIC RIGHTS OF WAY AND OTHER LAND USED BY THE GENERAL PUBLIC. PROPOSALS WHICH FALL WITHIN THE GLAMORGAN HERITAGE COAST AND AREAS OF HIGH LANDSCAPE IMPORTANCE, OR LIE OUTSIDE SUCH AREAS BUT HAVE AN UNACCEPTABLE ADVERSE VISUAL EFFECT UPON THEM WILL NOT BE PERMITTED;
  2. THE PROPOSAL HAS NO UNACCEPTABLE EFFECT UPON SITES OF CONSERVATION, ARCHAEOLOGICAL, HISTORICAL, ECOLOGICAL AND WILDLIFE IMPORTANCE;
  3. ALL POSSIBLE STEPS ARE TAKEN BY THE DEVELOPERS TO MINIMISE NOISE DISTURBANCE AND SHADOW FLICKER FROM THE TURBINES FOR LOCAL RESIDENTS. DEVELOPERS WILL BE REQUIRED TO AMELIORATE PROBLEMS BY THE USE OF APPROPRIATE LEGAL AGREEMENTS AND / OR CONDITIONS ATTACHED TO THE GRANTING OF PLANNING CONSENT;
  4. ALL POWER LINES CONNECTING THE TURBINES TO THE NATIONAL GRID SHOULD RESULT IN NO UNACCEPTABLE VISUAL EFFECT UPON THE LANDSCAPE OF THE VALE OF GLAMORGAN;
  5. THE NUMBERS OF ANCILLARY BUILDINGS ARE LIMITED AND ARE DESIGNED AND SITED TO MINIMISE THEIR IMPACT ON THE LANDSCAPE;
  6. THE CUMULATIVE EFFECTS OF DEVELOPMENT DO NOT HAVE AN UNACCEPTABLE IMPACT UPON THE LANDSCAPE;
  7. ACCESS FOR CONSTRUCTION TRAFFIC CAN BE PROVIDED WITHOUT DANGER TO HIGHWAY SAFETY AND SHOULD BE CONSTRUCTED IN LOCALLY SYMPATHETIC MATERIALS (I.E. ROAD BASED MATERIALS TOP DRESSED WITH LOCAL SOIL TO REGENERATION OF VEGETATION);
  8. THE PROPOSAL DOES NOT CREATE SIGNIFICANT OR IRREMEDIABLE RADIO INTERFERANCE;
  9. THE PROPOSAL DOES NOT UNACCEPTABLY EFFECT OPERATIONS UNDER THE CONTROL OF THE CIVIL AVIATION AUTHORITY OR THE MINISTRY OF DEFENCE; AND
  10. WITHIN 24 MONTHS OF PART OR THE WHOLE OF THE SITE BECOMING PERMANENTLY INOPERATIVE THE STRUCTURES SHALL BE REMOVED, AND THE SITE RESTORED TO ITS FORMER USE.

PERMANENTLY INOPERATIVE IS CONSIDERED TO BE WHEN A TURBINE HAS NOT BEEN IN OPERATION FOR THE PURPOSE OF ELECTRICITY PRODUCTION FOR A PERIOD EXCEEDING 6 MONTHS). 

Sites that are considered by developers to be appropriate for renewable energy development within the Vale are likely to be found at altitudes in excess of 30 meters above sea level, and are therefore likely to provide a potentially intrusive feature in the landscape. In order to allow the Council to assess the environmental impact of proposals, the Council will require developers to submit an Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) undertaken in accordance with the provisions of the Town and Country Planning (Environmental Impact Assessment) (England and Wales) Regulations 1999.

POLICY COMM 8 - OTHER RENEWABLE ENERGY SCHEMES

PROPOSALS FOR OTHER RENEWABLE ENERGY SCHEMES WILL BE PERMITTED IF ALL OF THE FOLLOWING CRITERIA ARE MET:

  1. THE PROPOSAL HAS NO UNACCEPTABLE EFFECT ON THE IMMEDIATE AND SURROUNDING COUNTRYSIDE;
  2. THE PROPOSAL HAS NO UNACCEPTABLE EFFECT UPON THE SITES OF CONSERVATION, ARCHAEOLOGICAL, HISTORICAL, ECOLOGICAL AND WILDLIFE IMPORTANCE;
  3. ADEQUATE MEASURES ARE TAKEN, BOTH DURING AND AFTER CONSTRUCTION, TO MINIMISE THE IMPACT OF THE DEVELOPMENT ON LOCAL LAND USE AND RESIDENTIAL AMENITY.
11.4.45.

The aim of the planning system is to secure economy, efficiency and amenity in the use of land in the public interest. The Council recognises that policies for developing renewable energy must be weighed carefully with its continuing commitment to policies which seek to protect the local environment. The Council acknowledges the advice in TAN 8 that proposals to harness renewable energy can display a variety of factors peculiar to the technology involved. Moreover, such schemes can have particular locational constraints since, in many cases the resources can only be harnessed where it occurs. The Council will assess applications for renewable energy developments in the light of the guidance put forward by the Welsh Assembly Government in TAN 8.

11.4.46.

In accordance with the requirements of schedule 2 of the Town and Country Planning (Environmental Impact Assessment) (England and Wales) Regulations 1999, planning applications proposing the development of renewable energy sources such as wind generation and Hydroelectricity must be accompanied by an Environmental Impact Assessment.

11.4.47.

SEVERN BARRAGE

The Council recognises that future potential of the Severn Estuary for tidal power, but it is considered that its development is unlikely to be implemented during the Plan period. The implications of a Severn Barrage tidal power scheme with a landfall in the Vale of Glamorgan are so great that the UDP would require considerable amendment. 

11.4.48.

CEMETERIES

The Council has been advised that during the Plan period there will be a requirement for additional burial space to be provided within the Barry, Penarth and Llantwit Major areas, because existing cemeteries are reaching capacity. Land for the development of new burial space will be made available as part of the Cogan Hall Farm development. 

11.4.49.

Whilst the Council has no statutory obligation in this matter it will in conjunction with Barry and Llantwit Major Town Councils seek to identify suitable land for burial purposes. Consideration will be given to proposals for all burial methods including traditional cemeteries, crematoriums and alternative green burials.

POLICY COMM 9 - ADDITIONAL BURIAL LAND

PROPOSALS FOR ADDITIONAL BURIAL LAND IN THE FOLLOWING IDENTIFIED AREAS OF NEED: BARRY, PENARTH, LLANTWIT MAJOR, WILL BE PERMITTED IF:

  1. PARKING AND SERVICING ARE PROVIDED IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE COUNCIL'S APPROVED GUIDELINES;
  2. THE PROPOSAL DOES NOT HAVE AN UNACCEPTABLE EFFECT ON RESIDENTIAL AMENITIES BY VIRTUE OF GIVING RISE TO NEW OR EXACERBATE EXISTING LOCAL PROBLEMS RESULTING FROM TRAFFIC GENERATION, HIGHWAY SAFETY, NOISE, SMELL OR OTHER AMENITY CONSIDERATIONS; AND
  3. THE PROPOSAL DOES NOT HAVE AN UNACCEPTABLE IMPACT ON GOOD QUALITY AGRICULTURAL LAND (GRADES 1, 2 AND 3A), ON AREAS OF ATTRACTIVE LANDSCAPE OR HIGH QUALITY TOWNSCAPE OR ON AREAS OF HISTORICAL, ARCHAEOLOGICAL OR ECOLOGICAL IMPORTANCE.
11.5.

IMPLEMENTATION

11.5.1.

The Council recognises that it has little direct control over the provision of some community and utility services. However, it will monitor existing and future planned provision and bring pressure upon the providers of such services where appropriate to adequately maintain and where necessary, improve the service. Likewise, through its development control function the Council will ensure that the providers of major utilities not only take account of meeting the require demand for their services but that any works are implemented in a manner which will not detract from the environmental quality of the Vale of Glamorgan.

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